Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet and Coil from China

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25 watt
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15000 watt/month

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 1.Structure of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Description

Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications. Production of cold formed corrugated sheets and profiles for roofing, cladding, decking, tiles, sandwich walls, rainwater protective systems, air conditioning duct as well as electrical appliances and engineering.

2.Main Features of the Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet

• Excellent process capability

• Smooth and flat surface

• Workability, durability

• Excellent anticorrosive property

• High strength

• Good formability

• Good visual effect


3.Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Images

 Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet and Coil from China

4.Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Specification

Standard: ASTM, JIS,EN

Grade: CS, DX51D+Z,SGCC, SS 230~550,S220GD+Z~S550GD+Z, SGC340~SGC570

Thickness: 0.1mm~5mm

Width: max 2000mm

Coil weight:3-12 MT

Coil ID:508/610mm

Surface structure: zero spangle, regular spangle or minimum spangle

Surface treatment: Chromate treatment, Oiled/dry, skinpassed/non-skinpassed

Packing: Standard seaworthy export package

Technology test results:


Yield strength

Tensile strength

Elongation %


Common PV




d=0,intact,no zinc removal

Mechanical interlocking JY




d=0,intact,no zinc removal

Structure JG




d=0,intact,no zinc removal

Deep drawn SC




d=0,intact,no zinc removal





d=0,intact,no zinc removal




5.FAQ of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet

We have organized several common questions for our clients,may help you sincerely:

1.How about your company

A world class manufacturer & supplier of castings forging in carbon steel and alloy steel,is one of the large-scale professional investment casting production bases in China,consisting of both casting foundry forging and machining factory. Annually more than 8000 tons Precision casting and forging parts are exported to markets in Europe,America and Japan. OEM casting and forging service available according to customers requirements.

2.How to guarantee the quality of the products

We have established the international advanced quality management system,every link from raw material to final product we have strict quality test;We resolutely put an end to unqualified products flowing into the market. At the same time, we will provide necessary follow-up service assurance.

3. How long can we receive the product after purchase?

Usually within thirty working days after receiving buyer’s advance payment or LC. We will arrange the factory manufacturing as soon as possible. The cargo readiness usually takes 15-30 days, but the shipment will depend on the vessel situation.




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Q:At what temperature would steel evaporate?
Steel is to broad. There are many types of steel with different melting/boiling points. Iron* has a boiling point of 5182 °F and a Heat of vaporization of 340 kJ·mol−1. iron is the main ingredient of steel, along with carbon and other various elements.
Q:What material is strongest? Human bone, steel, or concrete?
Steel would smash a bone ,and concrete needs steel reinforcing.But of these only a bone can heal. Steel is the strongest .
Q:How many millimeters is a number 3 steel crochet hook?
In the rest of the world, a #3 hook is 6.5 mm. But the thing to do is use the hook size according to the yarn you are using. You would never follow the pattern exactly for hook size, you know that! You must do a gauge swatch to find out what YOUR tension is, and if that yarn will make the kind of fabric YOU want. You need to do a little research on this... as you know. Don't you remember your first lesson when you took your basic beginner class? Review your notes.
Q:Painting Stainless Steel......?
I've also learned something today! Good luck and have fun!
Q:Is stainless steel good for a butterfly knife?
This isn't really a question for this section, but I'm still happy to help out since I'm a big cutlery nerd as well. One thing to look out for when buying a knife is a lack of specifics on what steel is being used. High Carbon Stainless Steel doesn't tell you what the steel is, just what it MIGHT be. Chances are it's something along the lines of 420HC or 440A, both of which are softer steels. They aren't the worst steels around, but they are very quick to dull. You'd be better off looking at the Balisongs of Benchmade. They'll cost more, but you'll know that you're getting something made with quality materials and that won't break on you. And if it does break for some odd reason, Benchmade's warranty and customer service are both fantastic. Although if a more questionable knife is okay with you as long as the price isn't too high, then at least 420HC and 440A aren't too brittle and will take a decent edge even though they'll dull quickly. As for whether stainless steel is good for a knife or not, that depends on the type of stainless steel and what you're going to use the knife for. Many stainless steels are more brittle than a carbon steel, so high carbon stainless steels are a bit more likely to rust but a little tougher as well. In a butterfly knife, a steel like that is a good way to go, although the steels used by Benchmade, as I mentioned, are of a much better quality.
Q:What is Damascus steel.?
Damascus or Wootz was a type of steel that appeared around 300BC It originated in India before spreading throughout Asia and the Middle East. It was considered a good steel, and for it's date of origin, exceptionally advanced for the level of technology in the ancient world. However the techniques to create the steel were lost forever after a decline in the swords manufacturing. The most popular theory is that the metal containing the required trace elements became less available over time due to unreliable trade routes. In the modern area, many scientists and metallurgists have studied the surviving blades, resulting in many discoveries such as evidence of carbon molecules fused in a crystalline structure. While the blades do provide some clues, it's only a small part of a much bigger picture as to the full process of the metal from raw to finished product. Now many have claimed to have recreated Damascus/Wootz steel, but none are recognised as being authentic. It has become a market ploy these days that draws people to purchasing the blades but all you are actually seeing is one of the many various forms of folded or patterned steel, which has varying degrees of quality, strength etc. We do know the steel was folded similar to the way the Japanese did in creation of old Katana, so often people will sell Damascus steel Katana that are nothing but folded steel swords like others. (Which is beautiful and traditional, but was a process designed to uniform impurities in the metal, something we no longer need to do with modern metals)
Q:Does Stainless Steel rust?
No it won't rust. Just make sure to get the pool water out of the piercing when done at the pool. Just to avoid drying out the skin too much.
Q:How does water cooling affect the hardness of steel?
Quenching results in smaller grains than air cooled. This means more boundaries, which means harder steel.
Q:Steel reinforced armor.?
I don't think that would work. First off, there's not enough carbon in steel - even very high carbon steels are only about 2% carbon. Second, the iron atoms in steel form a crystal lattice, in the shape of a cube, with another iron atom in the middle of the cube. Each cube is about 0.3 nm per side. Carbon atoms work their way into the crystals and displace the iron atoms. But a carbon nanotube is around 1 nanometer in diameter - that's 3 times as big as the iron lattice! So a nanotube wouldn't fit. One thing you might do, however, is make a composite - mix the materials together on a scale a little bigger than the atomic scale that the iron and carbon mix to make steel. Just like a carbon fiber bicycle frame or ski pole is strands of carbon (much bigger and not as strong as nanotubes) held together with epoxy, you could hold nanotube strands together with metal. Not sure it would be good for armor, but if you can figure out a way to do it, I'm sure someone will come up with a use for it!
Q:Can you use steel strings on a classical guitar?
NO ! NO! NO! Do not put steel strings on a classical guitar!! The increased tension can actually damage the guitar by causing the top to warp and can eventually pull the bridge right off of the guitar! I have seen it happen more than once! Ignore the other post, they are wrong! Classical guitars are designed to use nylon strings only!

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