Monocrystalline Solar Module-200w CNBM Series

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Shanghai
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25 pc
Supply Capability:
20000 pc/month

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Product Description:

Monocrystalline Solar Module-200w CNBM Seriess

High efficiency crystalline solar cell. Even if under the weak light, the solar module can produce maximum power output.

II Tempered glass (toughened glass): Anti-reflecting coating and high transmission rate glass increase the power output and mechanical strength of solar module.

III EVA and TPT: Using high quality EVA and TPT to prevent destroying and water.

IV AI frame: Without screw, rner connection. 6 holes on the frame can be installed easily.

V Junction box: Multi function junction box with water proof.

VI Long lifetime: ≥25 years; Less power decrease.

VII Good performance of preventing from atrocious weather such as wind and hails.

VIII Resisting moisture and etching effectively, not effected by geology.

IX The certificate issued by international authority: UL, TUV, IEC, CE.

Standard Test Conditions of  Monocrystalline  Silicon Solar Panel

The opto-electrical specifications shown below are stabilized values being measured at Standard Test Conditions, Irradiance: 1000W/m2, Spectrum: AM1.5 at 25°C, The info below is subject to manufacturing tolerances. Where appropriate minutes of measurement are available and are used for the dimensioning of the installation.

Advantages of Monocrystalline Silicon Solar Panel

• CNBM Solar performance guarantees for 25 years

• 12 years guarantee for workmanship

• Timeliness of delivery

• Quality Products certified (TÜV, UL, CE, ISO)


Specification


 

Monocrystalline Solar Module-200w CNBM Series

Monocrystalline Solar Module-200w CNBM Series


Certification


Monocrystalline Solar Module-200w CNBM Series

Monocrystalline Solar Module-200w CNBM Series

Monocrystalline Solar Module-200w CNBM Series

FAQ

We have organized several common questions for our clientsmay help you sincerely

①What price for each watt?

It depends on the quantity, delivery date and payment terms,

②What is your size for each module? Can you tell me the Parameter of your module?

We have different series of panels in different output, both c-Si and a-Si. Please take the specification sheet for your reference.

③Can you provide the peripheral products of the solar panels, such as the battery, controller, and inverter? If so, can you tell me how do they match each other?

Yes, we can, we have two companies for solar region, one is CNBM International, the other is CNBM engineering Co.

We can provide you not only the solar module but also the off grid solar system, we can also provide you service with on grid plant.

④What is your warranty system?

 Our product  performance guarantees for 25 years

• 12 years guarantee for workmanship

• Timeliness of delivery

• Quality Products certified (TÜV, UL, CE, ISO)

⑤How do you pack your products?

We have rich experience on how to pack the panels to make sure the safety on shipment when it arrives at the destination.

⑥ Can you do OEM for us?

Yes, we can.

⑦How long can we receive the product after purchase?

In the purchase of product within three working days, We will arrange the factory delivery as soon as possible. The pecific time of receiving is related to the state and position of customers.Commonly 7 to 10 working days can be served.

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Q:what is the best way to go solar?
Both solar and wind production is largely a function of location. If you live in the southwest where the sun shines most days, maybe solar is an option. If you happen to live in one of the wind corridors, maybe wind is an option. Neither one will be as reliable and cheap as your grid power, though. Best is to concentrate on conservation of energy use.
Q:Wiring in solar panels?
I am all for do-it yourselfers, I am one, but... Sorry to tell you, but connecting solar panels to grid power will require an electrician. There are many requirements for special disconnects to prevent harm to the utillity company workers that must be considered. You will also have to have an inverter sized to match your panels. The simple answer is to connect your panels to something specific, without connecting it into your house wiring. An example is to connect your water well pump to solar power and disconnect it from the grid. But you will still need an inverter and will need to calculate the power demands of the pump and the amount of power available from your panels, which varies by your longitude and latitude. It sound like a simple thing to do, but without special training and experience you will be sorry if you try this yourself.
Q:Why dont we have a gigantic solar panel system in the warm states,stretching miles across to supply the usa?
This is a great idea, but there are some intrinsic difficulties with the theory: First, the average US household uses 27.4kWh of power per day= aprox. 0,000 kWh per year. Solar panels create kWh/m^2/day. Therefore you would need 27 m^2 (290 ft^2) of solar panels per household. Not only does that use a lot of space, but it would also cost a fortune. We also have to take into account that the government does not want us to become dependent of oil for many reasons. Therefore it is unlikely the government would ever consider paying for it. Lastly, for power grids to stay functional at all times, backup power plants must be kept 'hot', to replace solar power stations as they stop producing. There is an energy cost to keep plants 'hot', which includes (in the case of coal plants) the burning of coal. Unfortunately, if the country is not willing to accept brownouts, the carbon footprint of any large scale solar project will have to accept the 'hot' non-producing power plants carbon emissions as their own. The continued advances in the ability to store electricity will greatly impact the successful implementation of a large scale solar power station being, carbon footprint free. However, it would be possible for every household to have their own solar panels. Since they would need about 290 ft^2 (or 5ft x 5ft), then it does seem reasonable that they could have this much on their roof or land somewhere. Any additional energy you make from the solar panels you can sell back to the power plants and make money. They could then use this extra energy to cover in brown out situations, etc. In order for this to work though, we would all need to be responsible for purchasing and installing our own solar panels. It would be nice if the government would offer greater incentives to do so.
Q:Solar panels.......Earning potential.?
it depends on your solar panel, but you can sure supply most if all of your electronics and electric stuff in your house on a sunny day. If you want to know exactly how much power it supplies and how much $$ you can save you simply have to calculate how much power your home consumes per day/month. I know of people totally reliable on solar power for their home and I too will put solar panels on my home one day.
Q:Solar panels in the Bay Area?
PV Solar panels all work the same. There aren't any climate specific ones. There is enough sun in San Francisco to produce energy using solar panels however, the the same panels located in a sunnier area will produce more energy. Depending on the size of your system, you will probably need a few more panels than an area that receives more sun to produce the same amount of energy. But they will still produce energy, even on overcast days. The solar installers will make all the calculations to determine what size system you will need to produce as much energy as you want. In California, you don't want to produce more than you consume in a 2 month period because currently, you are not able to sell your excess credits back to PGE after your 2 month cycle. Your system will cost more to produce the same amount of power than my system because I have less overcast days than you do. You will have to make the decision if the cost is worth your while. I expect my system to be totally paid for in around 8-9 years, working in the cost of inflation for electricity. After that, I will be paying nothing for electricty for as long as I stay in my house.
Q:Parts needed to build a solar panel?
You're missing a few assumptions: - where on the globe? - how well is your house insulated, how do you plan to heat/cool your house? - why do you insist on power wasting appliances like plasma screens? Usually, unless it's absolutely impossible, a grid-tie-in system is much better than an insular system. You could use the grid to 'store' electricity for those times when the sun isn't shining and as fall-back if your yield isn't quite as good as you calculated. With the battery system, you'll have to specify your reliability requirements. If you want a 00% guarantee that you'll always have electricity, even if the sun is not shining for a week longer than you've planned according to the past weather history of your area, you'll either have to ridiculously oversize your battery (and panel) system, or plan for some sort of backup system anyway. Finally, if you're really planing such a system, you might want to take a look at the fridges and freezers used on sailboats: these use a eutectic cold accumulator, i.e. you 'charge' the fridge when the engine is running (or the sun is shining) and it'll then keep the temperature for another ~2...35 (professional systems) hours.
Q:DIY home solar panels?
Not a good idea. The reason why panels are that much more expensive than cells is that the panels themselves are not that cheap either. If you start with the cells, you'll need - mechanical protection (hail, ice, snow) - electrical protection (i.e. waterproofing - if water comes in contact with the cells and wires, you'll get electrolysis which will corrode your wires and contacts faster than you can say 'b*mmer') - that setup will need to withstand temperatures between -20 and +30 °C (only guessing, might be worse) - oh, and the side facing the sun must be transparent (as far as possible) Now as to connecting the stuff: no, it will be neither easy to connect it to the house power nor to the grid - which is why that step (at least) in all countries I know of must be done by a certified electrician. If you get it wrong and you're lucky, only _your_ inverter will explode. Regarding the power: these 4W per cell (or kW for your shed) is the peak value, i.e. with the sun shining orthogonally onto the cells on a clear day. Since this (for a fixed installation) will only be true (at most) for a few minutes on a few days each year, your overall yield will be significantly less, probably more like 4 kWh/day for each clear day for each kWpeak you install _IF_ the shed roof is oriented exactly south and inclined towards the sun's noon position at the spring/autumn equinox (i.e. inclination angle = your geographical latitude). How many clear days do you have in britain? Yes, I had a similar idea for myself - but for one thing, the registered companies I addressed apparently weren't really interested in that small fry, plus the cost of the system + setup would barely have been amortized after the expected lifetime, even taking into account the (german) governmental subsidies. If I had the money to spare, I'd rather invest in a communal solar park. Much better ROI, the large installations get much better prices (per kW) for the setup.
Q:5kw Solar Panel Roof Kit?
Note that aiming is important - the sun is going to be perpendicular to the panels for only a few hours a year unless they are on an adjustable mount, so picking the time you most want power should be a factor in the angle they are mounted at - you can't keep the highest level of sun for summer into the winter time when the sun is much lower in the sky for a shorter time.
Q:Where can i find a list of solar panel manufactures worldwide?
Actually Ofir, it is much easier and less expensive than you might believe. What you need is a magazine, like, Solar Today. There is only one that I am familiar with that gets into the nuts and bolts of solar panel manufacturers, installation, and other types of renewable energy. It's called, Home Power Magazine. We have a home that has been powered by the wind and sun for the last 0 years or so, and most of our initial information came from Home Power, and afterward, from many of the sources that they have in their articles. Every few issures, they take an item connected to renewable energy, such as an inverter, wind turbine, water turbine, or solar panel, and list all the different models that are available. They are broken down by manufacturer, and include specifications like power output, range of voltages, efficiency, materials, and even where they are manufactured. If you subscribe online for one year, the cost is around $25 USD, you will have access to all the previous issues that are archived on their website. You can use their search engine to locate an article listing all the solar panels, they did one a year or so ago with all the information you are looking for. Despite what you might be hearing, solar power usage is growing at an incredible rate. In the US alone, there are over 00,000 homes and businesses operating some level of solar power right now, that's good news. As far as different countries using different requirements, most all of the manufacturers today are selling their products to most countries worldwide, they are designed to meet requirements for almost anyplace you might use them. Check the magazine out today, you might learn more than you were originally looking for. I will include their link below, and some other good sources for information. You can google any one of them to find their website. Good luck, and take care...Rudydoo
Q:Solar Panel Help, Trying to go green.?
LOL!! There is a lot more to this than you might imagine. This is a very rough approximation but look at the attached and column labeled 6.3KW. Look down that column and you see where it says Est. First Year KWH Generated ,025. So if we were to assume that each month it will produce ,025/2 kwh. (not true for January but I am trying to keep this simple. The installed price without any rebates is $44,050. ;-) Sorry! You will find some a little cheaper... some a little more expensive but none are a LOT cheaper than this. (this price does not even include energy storage, so the sun goes down and you will stop producing electricity). This is why, when people start looking at this sort of thing, they always do what they can to conserve electricity first. It is always much cheaper to conserve, then worry about alternate energy.

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