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ZINC COATING:60g/m2  (-/+10g/m2)
COIL ID:508mm

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Q:Are steel doors insulated?
Not all doors are created equal so maybe it has insulation but doubtful. 20yrs ago they didn't put insulation into doors and a solid steel door is not light and would rip the hinges off. They do not put solid steel doors into homes Your door is steel sheet metal thin and the door is hollow core air in between them that's why its cold A solid wood door with proper insulation around it and weather stripping under it is more efficient in preventing heat loss The only purpose of a steel door is security, harder to kick in a steal door, which is the reason why it was installed. The old owner probably got the house robbed and they kicked in the original flimsy door. So it was recommended that he use a steel door. Steel does not insulate against hot or cold it absorbs it. Hence why its cold, no amount of weather stripping will prevent heat loss the door itself absorbs heat and cold The cure is another door solid core wood door is strong and does not have the same properties as steel doors Hope that helps Lr
Q:how is steel made????????
That is an ENORMOUS subject that won't fit in this little box. Run an internet search on steel making. Essentially, steel is an alloy of iron and other metals chosen to give it the desired properties. These metals usually come from ores that are extracted from the earth. Actually, iron has too much carbon for most steel making purposes, and the carbon must be burned off. Iron is melted in a blast furnace, and oxygen is used to burn off the excess carbon. Then the molten metal is mixed with molten alloy metals and poured into molds to make ingots, which are blocks of steel of a size convenient for handling. Steel can also be made by re-melting scrap metal and adjusting the amounts of various adulterants or alloy metals at molten temperatures. The ingots are taken to rolling mills to be shaped into rods, pipes, sheet metal, and structural shapes. Molten iron and steel can also be poured into molds to produce complex shapes.
Q:Stainless steel kitchen sink cleaning and polish?
A stainless steel kitchen sink is durable, easy to keep clean and disinfect, and will only grow more beautiful with age - if you take proper care of it. Clean the sink with soapy water, or a stainless steel cleaner (Spray N Sheen Stainless Steel Cleaner/Polish/Protectant) once or twice a week. Once or twice a month, fill the sink half full with a 50/50 solution of bleach and water or a special stainless steel cleaner (Stainless Steel Cleaner). Let it soak for about 15 minutes, then wash the sides and bottom and let it drain. Remember to wipe dry when done.
Q:REAL steeled boned corsets?
Hi, There are 3 types of corsets: Fashion corsets, Authentic corsets and Waist training corsets. The fashion corsets are designed for light enclasping of body. They are made with plastics bones usually. The authentic corsets can reduce your waist size about 4 - 5 and the waist training corsets about 6. They both are made with steel spirals and flat bones. The waist training corsets are recommended for experienced wearers only. Look on info pages of the seller. The corsets reinforced with plastic bones are cheap with low durability.
Q:Can carbon steel be solution annealed?
No. Carbon steel has two different crystal structures, FCC and BCC , depending on the temperature. when you heat steel up and then quench it, it locks the crystal structure into the BCC form. this makes it hard. whereas precipitation hardened austentic stainlesses remain BCC regardless of the temp, so the hardness change is not a function of thermally induced strain. you can anneal carbon steel but the thermal profile is closer to the precipitation profile of PH stainlesses than it is to the Solution annealing profile.
Q:how to understand the chemistry of a metal.. especially steel.. from their names...?
For steels with a four number code like 1020, 4140 ect the first two digits are the alloying information. I think you need to memorise those. 10 steels are plain carbon steel with no alloying. 41 steels are chrome-molly. The third and forth digits are the carbon content. 1020 is 0.2% Carbon, 4140 is 0.4% carbon. I don't know if there is a system to stainless steels.
Q:i know stainless steel don't rust, does that go the same for just regular steel..?
There are dozens of types of steels, some stainless and some not. They differ a lot in their chemical composition and in how they're made (especially heat treating methods). They all vary in their strength, working properties and corrosion resistance. Regular steel (technically carbon steel--mostly iron, with a little bit of carbon) rusts quite badly if unprotected and in the right environmental conditions i.e. humidity/moisture. The iron in regular steel reacts with oxygen to form iron oxide--the orange/red stuff we call rust. Iron oxide is a loose and porous material which provides no protection to the underlying steel, which is why rusted regular steel will continue to rust. Stainless steel, in addition to containing iron and carbon, contains chromium as a component--and it's the chromium that is important for corrosion protection. To be fair, even stainless steel rusts but what happens is that it's the chromium that reacts with oxygen to create a microscopically-thin layer of chromium oxide. This layer is very tough and actually protects the uncorroded steel, preventing further corrosion. Broadly speaking, the higher the chromium content, the more corrosion resistant the stainless steel.
Q:how to clean old steel coins?
You really don't want to do anything to to them. If they're rusty, that's just the way they are now. Store them in a dry place. Cleaning will do more damage than good, and will hurt the value. If it were possible to undo the damage, our cars would never rust, iron pipes wouldn't pit, and everything would be made of steel. Don't let it worry you, they're still worth having.
Q:When was steel first used in buildings?
steel was first used in the 1800s in buildings.
Q:What is the history of steel?
There's wide history of steel, you can read different tutorials online to know more about it. Check wiki for detailed information.

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