PRE-PAINTED ALUZINC STEEL IN COIL

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Product Description:

Specification

1. Thickness: 0.3-0.8mm

2. Width: 914-1250mm

3. Inner Diameter: 508mm

4. Weight of Steel Coil: 3-15MT

5. Available Dipped Layer: 50-150g/m2

6. Surface Texture: Normal Coated

7. Type of coating structure: 2/1 Coat the top surface of the steel sheet twice, coat the bottom surface once, and bake the sheet twice.

8. Front side paint thickness: 15-25μm (bottome paint + top paint)

9. Back side paint thickness: 5-10μm

Mechanical Properties

1. Mechanical properties of base metals

Grade

Tensile Test

Yield Strength

MPa

Tensile Strength

MPa

Elongation A80mm % ≥

DC51D+AZ

280-325

320-500

22

DC52D+AZ

240-300

270-420

26

DC53D+AZ

140-260

270-380

30

2. Common performance of front coating

(1). Thickness: ≥20μm

(2). Pencil Hardness: 2H

(3). 60° specular glossiness of coating: >60

(4). 180°bend: ≤3T

(5). Impact: ≥9J

(6). Salt Fog Resistant: ≥500h

(7). Color difference: <3ΔE

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Q:What is the difference between carbon steel and spring steel?
High Carbon Spring Steel
Q:i know stainless steel don't rust, does that go the same for just regular steel..?
There are dozens of types of steels, some stainless and some not. They differ a lot in their chemical composition and in how they're made (especially heat treating methods). They all vary in their strength, working properties and corrosion resistance. Regular steel (technically carbon steel--mostly iron, with a little bit of carbon) rusts quite badly if unprotected and in the right environmental conditions i.e. humidity/moisture. The iron in regular steel reacts with oxygen to form iron oxide--the orange/red stuff we call rust. Iron oxide is a loose and porous material which provides no protection to the underlying steel, which is why rusted regular steel will continue to rust. Stainless steel, in addition to containing iron and carbon, contains chromium as a component--and it's the chromium that is important for corrosion protection. To be fair, even stainless steel rusts but what happens is that it's the chromium that reacts with oxygen to create a microscopically-thin layer of chromium oxide. This layer is very tough and actually protects the uncorroded steel, preventing further corrosion. Broadly speaking, the higher the chromium content, the more corrosion resistant the stainless steel.
Q:mild steel?
i thnk 7.85 the density of ms is 7.85 kg/cm2 and formula is density=mass/volume u have volume=1m3 7.85*1=mass so 7.85 kg
Q:Disadvantages of stainless steel?
Stainless Steel has more advantages than disadvantages. But u asked for disadvantages so they r as follows i've given common disadvantages more can be found on Google. Disadvantages of Stainless Steel: Stainless steel tends to scratch and dent. Food, grease and fingerprints show very clearly on stainless steel, making frequent wiping and cleaning a necessity. High initial cost Difficult to fabricate, or in other words, it is not as malleable as other metals, say iron, and hence if not fabricated properly, results in costly re-work. Difficult to weld High cost of polishing etc. i.e. adding finishing touches for the market. there are advantages more than disadvantages. But u asked for disadvantages that's why i have given only disadvantages of stainless steel Hope what u want u got.
Q:is carbon steel a good matirial for a usable sword?
carbon steel will hold a good edge, but will corrode easily. The nicest blades I have seen are made from damascus steel (repeatedly folded over and over). It makes a blade which is good and flexible sideways, but more rigid in the cutting direction, and it holds an edge extremely well. It also looks awesome due to the grain effect from the folds, but is very expensive.
Q:steel helmet protection?
Steel helmets were made to stop shrapnel; steel fragments from artillery bursts. They were never meant to stop bullets and most modern rifle rounds will penetrate a steel helmet with ease. The US went to Kevlar helmets for lighter weight and better ballistic protection. Some helmets will deflect handgun rounds. Over half of combat injuries were caused by artillery, so the thinking was to reduce head injuries from shrapnel.
Q:how do you rate the hardness of steel?
For the backyarder to rate hardness, you do a file test. If a smooth file will not mark the steel, it's around 60+RC (Rockwell C scale). If it will mark it with difficulty, the hardness is probably around 56- 58RC. If it will file easily, it's mild steel or is in annealed form, if it is a hardenable steel.
Q:Why aren't bullets made of steel?
As others have mentioned, steel lacks the ductility to conform to rifling and seal the bore. Cannon projectiles, which usually are made of steel, overcome this problem by using one or more driving bands of softer metal, usually brass or bronze, but sometimes even plastic, on the circumference of the projectile, usually close to the base. The body of the projectile rides on the lands, while the driving band fills the grooves, seals the bore and imparts the stabilizing spin to the projectile.
Q:CONNECTING STAINLESS STEEL TUBE (SOLDER?)?
Soft Soldering All grades of stainless steel can be soldered with lead-tin soft solder. Leaded solders should not be used when the product being soldered is used for food processing, serving or transport. Soldered joints are relatively weak compared to the strength of the steel, so this method should not be used where the mechanical strength is dependent upon the soldered joint. Strength can be added if the edges are first lock-seamed, spot welded or riveted. In general, welding is always preferable to soldering. Recommended procedure for soldering: · 1. The steel surfaces must be clean and free of oxidation. · 2. A rough surface improves adherence of the solder, so roughening with grinding wheel, file or coarse abrasive paper is recommended. · 3. Use a phosphoric acid based flux. Hydrochloric acid based fluxes require neutralising after soldering as any remnant traces will be highly corrosive to the steel. Hydrochloric acid based fluxes are not recommended for soldering of stainless steels. · 4. Flux should be applied with a brush, to only the area being soldered. · 5. A large, hot iron is recommended. Use the same temperature as for carbon steel, but a longer time will be required because of stainless steel's low thermal conductivity. · 6. Any type of solder can be used, but at least 50% tin is recommended. Solder with 60-70% tin and 30-40% lead has a better colour match and greater strength.
Q:What is Mild Steel? Is it the same as Seamless Steel?
iron mild steel are not the same but you need iron to make mild steel this is done by the process off a blast furnace were iron ore coke limestone are added coke is coal which has been put into a coking oven to remove some impurities then once the coke, iron ore limestone are mixed this and comes out the bottom of the blast furnace red hot is know as pure iron once you have this you then put it into the BOS Basic Oxygen Steel making were pure oxygen is blown onto the the iron for about 45 min which then turns the iron into steel. hope this helps :o)

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