hot-dip galvanized/ aluzinc steel in China

Ref Price:
Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
20 m.t.
Supply Capability:
5000000 m.t./month

OKorder Service Pledge

Quality Product

Order On-line Tracking

Timely Delivery

OKorder Service Pledge

Credit Rating

Credit Services

Credit Purchasing

Share to:

Product Description:

Description:

Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications.

 

 

Standard:

AISI,ASTM,BS,DIN,GB,JIS

Grade:

SGCC,DX51D/DX52D/S250,280GD

Thickness:

0.12-4.0 mm

Place  of Origin:

China  (Mainland)

Brand  Name:

N/M

Model  Number:

ssp-226

Type:

Steel  Coil

Technique:

Cold  Rolled

Surface  Treatment:

galvanized/  Galvalume/zinc coatting

Application:

strong  anti-corrosion ability,cold bending molded manufacturablity

Special  Use:

High-strength  Steel Plate

Width:

600-1250 mm

Length:

in  coil

product:

g40  prime/secordary hot-dip galvanized cold rolled steel coil/sheet

 

 

Packaging  & Delivery

 

 

 

 

 

Packaging  Detail:

standard  export package,Other types of packing can be customized as per client's  requirement.

Delivery  Detail:

as  per client's requirements

Service:

1,on time delivery
2,high quality with competitive price
3,good service
4,long-term cooperation
5, rely on honors

 

 

Send a message to us:

Remaining: 4000 characters

- Self introduction

- Required specifications

- Inquire about price/MOQ

Q:How is steel manufactured?
Abed is off on some of the details... Steel is, by definition, Fe-C. There are thousands of different steel alloys and I am not aware of a single one that is simpkly Fe-Ag. There are different processes but the chemistry is basically the same, converting the iron compounds we dig out of the ground into metallic iron. Iron is typically found as iron oxides or iron sulfides (not with a lot of carbon). We add carbon so the carbon takes the oxygen from the Fe atoms making Fe + CO/CO2. Research iron smelting, iron ore, reduction of iron oxide, these types of things. You will find plenty of information because this is one of the most important industrial processes humans have. Good luck
Q:Is carbon steel a type of alloy?
Yes. it's an alloy of iron and carbon. Carbon steel can either mean plain carbon steel which is steel that doesn't have significant amounts of other elements, like chromium, manganese, or molybdenum. It can also be used to refer to ANY steel that is NOT a stainless steel. Alloy steel is any steel that has greater than 1% of other elements added to it besides carbon. Stainless steel might be in a certain sense be considered alloy steel but I think most people in the steel business consider it as it's own separate material from carbon steels. Many stainless steels contain only trace amounts of carbon, so they should rightly be considered iron-chromium alloys, not steel, which by default refers to iron-carbon alloys. Note that nearly all modern carbon steels also contain 0.2%-0.5% manganese and silicon. Even steels that are otherwise considered plain carbon and not alloy steels. Mn and Si are added because they prevent defects in cast steel ingots, and hot rolled items like billets and plates. However at low levels they don't affect the properties of the steel greatly.
Q:Is rail steel like other types of steel?
As so much about the railroad is variable, so is the steel used for the rail. For one thing, all rail is not the same size. It is classified by weight per yard. For example, most tangent (straight) track is 139 lbs rail, meaning three feet of it weighs this much. Secondary track, such as found on branch lines and in yards or used on sidings is not as heavy. Track used in curvature may be the same weight, but not always. The reason is there is much more stress imparted to the roadbed in curvature. Most steel on main tracks has a higher carbon content, but there is a point of diminishing returns, as this rail is more brittle as a result. Good luck trying to melt it. In the field, this rail is cut by a saw with diamond studded circular blades. The reason why is it takes a lot more time to try to cut it with an acetylene torch. In the US, certain areas, such as on some bridges, the cross-ties (sleepers) are indeed made of steel, in addition to concrete and wood. The potential for fire is too great for wood in these instances. In addition, if even a single wheel derails, concrete ties tend to explode when stressed this way. All of which makes steel cross-ties worth the extra cost.
Q:Is steel lighter than iron?
Steel and iron weight about the same, or more correctly, have about the same density. Steel is stronger, which allows structures to be built with less material, and thus lighter.
Q:Why is stainless steel rust proof?
Rust Proof Metal
Q:Why is it called Stainless Steel?
It is called stainless because it is much more highly resistant to rust and corrosion. It is stainless in camparison to other steels, such as carbon steel.
Q:Use for spring steel?
*Spring steel is a low alloy, medium carbon steel with a very high yield strength. This allows objects made of spring steel to return to their original shape despite significant bending or twisting. Silicon is the key component to most spring steel alloys. An example of a spring steel used for cars would be AISI 9255 (DIN and UNI: 55Si7, AFNOR 55S7), containing 1.50%-1.80% silicon, 0.70%-1.00% manganese and 0.52%-0.60% carbon. Most spring steels (as used in cars) are hardened and tempered to about 45 Rockwell C. the most widely used spring steel is ASTM A228 (0.80–0.95% carbon), which is also known as music wire. Spring steel is one of the most popular materials used in the fabrication of lock picks due to its pliability and resilience.
Q:i want to see the atomic structure of carbon steel?
This is actually a quite complex question... The atomic arrangement in steels can be controlled over a pretty wide range of different structures. This is really the fundamental reason why steel is such a commonly used material. The different atomic structures produce different physical properties so metallurgists have developed many different processes to control the atomic structure to get the properties they want. One simple answer is that Fe is BCC, body centered cubic at room temperature at equilibrium conditions. When you heat Fe up, it transforms to FCC, face centered cubic. If you continue heating Fe, it goes back to BCC, then it melts. The addition of C makes these structures (and the transformation temperatures) different. Deviating from equilibrium conditions by, for example, cooling very quickly (quenching) creates different atomic structures (one of the most important is known as martensite). Depending on how much C is in the steel, you can also have two different atomic structures (two different phases) present in equilibirum, for example, pearlite which is a mix of alpha Fe (BCC) and iron carbide Fe3C (orthorombic crystal structure). So... you need to think a little more about exactly what you want a picture of. I hope this helps
Q:what is the similarity beetween ironn and steel?
Iron is raw from iron ore, steel has other metals added such as alloys or copper to give tesil strength and flexibility
Q:1944 Steel Penny?
1944 Steel Penny

1. Manufacturer Overview

Location
Year Established
Annual Output Value
Main Markets
Company Certifications

2. Manufacturer Certificates

a) Certification Name  
Range  
Reference  
Validity Period  

3. Manufacturer Capability

a)Trade Capacity  
Nearest Port
Export Percentage
No.of Employees in Trade Department
Language Spoken:
b)Factory Information  
Factory Size:
No. of Production Lines
Contract Manufacturing
Product Price Range