galvanized steel coil

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Product Description:

  • Grade: SGH340, DX51D and SGCC (customized)

  • Surface treatment: passivation, oiling, chromed, unoiled

  • Spangle types: minimal, zero and large

  • Thickness: 0.37 to 3.5mm

  • Width: greater than 1,000mm

  • Inner diameter: 508 to 610mm

  • Zinc coating: greater than 80g/m2

  • Applications:

    • Construction, home appliance, hardware and machinery

  • Standards:

    • JIS g3302 1998, ASTM a653 2003, EN10142 1990

    • EN10327 2004, AS1397 2001, GB2518-2004

  • Packing: export packing/sea worthy for international delivery

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Q:Which is stronger for cars, carbon fiber or steel?
Ok, your friend is wrong. Carbon fiber can outperform steel in many applications. It is lighter and stronger in tension. Compression, however, is not a property carbon fiber composites do well under. The strength of carbon fiber composites comes from the design, or layup, of the fibers. When the layers are properly orientated the composite can do very well. But, it can’t handle stress from any direction, only the directions it’s designed to be used in. Now, back to the car crash… A crash is a situation involving high amounts of crushing forces and shockwaves that would travel around the vehicle. If the impact itself didn’t crush the composite, the shock waves could cause hidden damage, such as delimitation, in areas that may not even be close to the impact area. As for it being easy to fix, well that is also dead wrong. Unlike steel, carbon fiber composites can’t be welded, straightened, or bent into place. Once a composite has sustained damage it usually needs to be replaced. Closing thoughts… Keep this in mind, it’s not the fibers themselves that are so weak, it’s the glue holding them together. As of today, the only way to make these strong light weight components is to glue them together. They do a good job doing what they are designed to do, but fail easily with impact and compression loading.
Q:Does steel have water in it?
Condensation forms when temperatures vary 'quickly'. The air itself is what provides the moisture. There you go.
Q:How do you rate steel? probably mean Steel 44... right?
Q:Question about whetstones and honing steels.?
In general, whetstones will actually remove metal in order to sharpen a blade, and the angle they're used at is important too. A steel will just straighten the blade between uses, not actually remove metal. The effect is to make it sharper than it was just before, but only because it's straighter. Using a knife makes the very thin edge kind of flatten or even fold over a bit, or get wavy, the steel just straightens it back out (imagine what happens when the very thin blade gets pressed down repeatedly on a cutting board, or even cuts through foods repeatedly). (A whetstone is used only when steeling finally just isn't enough to get the blade sharp as needed.) .
Q:carbon steel?
All steel has carbon in it, usually less than 1%. The fancy steels that have enough other elements mixed in are generally called alloy steels. So, carbon steel usually refers to the most basic cheap steel. A36 is a kind of carbon steel that meets specific standards of the A36 specification. I don't know what 01 carbon steel is. Steel is available all over Los Angeles so just look in the phone book yellow pages under steel or metal. If you are near El Monte, my favorite place is Industrial Pipe and Steel, lots of cheap scrap, used machinery, and a huge industrial hardware store built right in. There is a place in Gardena called MK Metals. There's a great place just north of the Burbank airport (can't remember the name) and one in Harbor City called Action Metals (big on recycling). No sense driving all over. Just check the phone book. Two very common carbon steels just go by the terms hot rolled and cold rolled. Hot rolled is the cheapest and softest and still has the mill scale attached so the surface is a little rough and uneven, but this is by far the most commonly used. Cold rolled (usually the AISI 1018 grade) has been work hardened and rolled flat and smooth. It's slightly more expensive but stronger and prettier. If you are going to cut away some of the thickness and you want the steel to remain flat, you probably want hot rolled steel because sometimes the cold rolled steel (CRS) will warp. It does that because the steel is already prestressed from the cold rolling process and when you cut away some of the pre-stressed material the forces holding the material flat are no longer balanced.
Q:What material is strongest? Human bone, steel, or concrete?
Steel is used to shape and reinforce concrete. Steel is also used in cutting bones in surgery and repairing bone through use of steel pins and braces. So, the answer is most definitely steel. In answer to your watch question, the volume of concrete was greater than that of your watch. The question of large volume vs. small volume is an easy one. Ten tons of human bone would easily reduce a 1 lb block of concrete to powder. Likewise, ten tons of concrete would snap a steel bar like a toothpick. Your watch had much less volume than the concrete you dropped it on. Furthermore, with enough force, your watch would have made a hole in the concrete, but its acceleration was not enough to counter the impacting force of the solid concrete reinforced by the soil and clay below it.
Q:How to bend stainless steel?
We are regular buyers of such bends.
Q:Coating on Steel Wool?
It will be very effective if you remove the oil by appling protective polymer spin coating to the edge, top and underside of the wafer, which makes those surfaces impervious to most chemical etchants. To learn more about the spin coating theory you may check out the following source.
Q:How difficult is it to harden steel?
Some steel won't 'harden' very much to begin with. Mild steel found commonly around the shop/farm/house has few alloys other than carbon, and may not get the desired hardness no matter what you do. A quick test to see what type you have (mild steel vs. alloy) is to touch it to a grinding wheel.
Q:what is difference between high carbon steel blade for katana swords?

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