galvanized steel coil

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Tianjin
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8000 m.t. m.t./month
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Product Description:

  • Grade: SGH340, DX51D and SGCC (customized)

  • Surface treatment: passivation, oiling, chromed, unoiled

  • Spangle types: minimal, zero and large

  • Thickness: 0.37 to 3.5mm

  • Width: greater than 1,000mm

  • Inner diameter: 508 to 610mm

  • Zinc coating: greater than 80g/m2

  • Applications:

    • Construction, home appliance, hardware and machinery


  • Standards:

    • JIS g3302 1998, ASTM a653 2003, EN10142 1990

    • EN10327 2004, AS1397 2001, GB2518-2004


  • Packing: export packing/sea worthy for international delivery


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Q:Is steel lighter than iron?
There are lightweight steel alloys that are lighter, for a given volume, than pig iron. The words iron and steel have referred to different materials at different times, and are used in different ways. A steel structure may also be lighter because steel alloys are stronger, in a given cross-section, that iron or other types of steel. For example, a 1-inch bar of chrome-vanadium steel is stronger than a 1-inch bar of 4130 mild steel or pig iron. The more you find out about it, the more complicated it is. But the answer to your question is (a) Yes, and (b) it's all relative.
Q:working load of steel anchor ?
Your title asks for the working load, yet your problem asks for the failure load (ripping the plate). These are two different things, since there must be a factor of safety on the failure load to get to the working load. The factor of safety varies from code to code and depending on what the plate/chain is being used for. The failure load would be the net cross section of the plate (after subtracting out the hole) x the strength of the plate. In this case it would be (2 - .5)*3/16*38000psi=10,687.5 lbs You would also need to check the strength of the chain to make sure that it doesn't break before the plate.
Q:Guns, Germs, and Steel?
i dont really understand this question but if it means to how it was before then it was absent because the native americans were not into technology so they obviously had no guns created that was something that they had traded to get from europe as for the germs i ddo not know about thta really except for if it means that common disease and one of the diseases most used in history books is malaysa from mosquitos but when they had traded with europe they got all sorts of diseases now for steel the only reason i remember them traveling for is for gold and i dont remember them ever looking for it until 13 colonies were established as you can see im not exactly sure about germs and steels but i know that the guns part is correct
Q:How did the planes break the steel?
I saw a one-hour program about this on PBS a couple of years ago. The buildings were constructed with the concrete-clad steel supporting columns at the center of the buildings, with a relatively thin lattice of steel struts along the outer wall. When the planes hit, they sheered through the thin steel struts easily by sheer momentum, while, at the same time, the thin steel stripped off the wings. The bodies of the planes got as far as the supporting columns in the center of the buildings, but were stopped there. The heaviest, densest pieces, the engines, went completely through the buildings and popped out the other side. It's important to understand that even light materials can cut through metal, if the light material is going fast enough. I saw this first hand, when I was in the Navy and stationed on board ship. We had a helicopter crash on our flight deck during heavy weather. The blades were made of light, carbon-composite material, but they were going so fast that they cut through the aluminum deck. I still have photos of that damage.
Q:Why can hot rolled coils be placed outside?
Because hot-rolled steel coils are generally used as raw material for semi-finished products, they have to be further used for pickling and cold rolling to make more use. The rust and dust can be removed after pickling
Q:In the warehouse management system of steel coil
The warehouse is set to be required under the factories and production equipment and manpower planning, reasonable layout; to strengthen the internal economic responsibility system, scientific division, forming material export management assurance system; the service must implement the work quality standard > standardization, application of modern management technology and the ABC classification method, and constantly improve the level of warehouse management.
Q:how do they make stainless steel?
Stainless steel is regular steel that has had nickel added in the manufacturing process. Because of the nickel it prevents rust.
Q:Steel-toed boots in cold weather?
Yes, steel-toe boots are cold, thick wool socks or not. Suggest using Cofra orange colored pull-on knee boots. Non-steel toe cap resistant to 200 joule (one and a half tons of crush protection), penetration resistance, cold insulation to minus 20, ankle protection, heat resistant outer sole 300 degrees for one minute, energy absorption of seat region, slip resistance, the biggest traction cletes I've ever seen and they look like big boots seen the acid trip pretending to be film titled: Yellow Submarine. Available: www.cofra.it
Q:what steel anodizes well?
Steel doesn't anodize in the sense that aluminum and some other metals do. However, it can be heat-colored. The trick is to clean the surface first (it must be oxide free), then heat gently until the colors appear. These are called temper colors in steel. They are due to a thin adherent layer of oxide that forms and thickens as temperature is increased. They are quite temperature dependent. As the steel is heated, the first color to appear is pale yellow. This will progress through darker yellows, browns, purples, and blues as the temperature rises. Above blue, the oxide becomes the gray/black color you are apparently getting - this is the result of heating too fast and too hot. See the chart at the site below for colors in plain carbon steel. Note that the temperatures are pretty low - It all starts around 400 F and if you go above 600 F the show's all over.
Q:were the twin towers made from reinforced steel?
There is no way you could make a 110 floor building out of concrete.

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