EDDS ASTM A653 Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil for cold forming good use CNBM

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Loading Port:
Guangzhou
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
20 m.t.
Supply Capability:
3000 m.t./month

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Product Description:

Quick Details

  • Standard: DIN

  • Grade: HX160YD/HX180/BD/HX300LAD

  • Type: Steel Coil

  • Surface Treatment: Galvanized

  • Application: High proof strength for cold forming

  • Width: 600-1534mm

  • Length: Coil

Packaging & Delivery

Packaging Details:Oscillated wound: one coil per bundle, inner is the protecting humidity-proof wax paper. Medium is plastic film. Outer is sackcloth or compound paper packing. Coil to be laid on single type pallet (one pile per pallet)
Delivery Detail:Depends on specification and order quanity.

Specifications &Feature:

(1) Type of zinc coating finish: regular spangle, minimized spangle and skin-pass.  
(2) Types of surface qualities: as coated surface, improved surface and best quality surface.
(3) Surface treatment: chemically passivated, chromate-free passivation, phosphate, anti-finger print, phosphateand, self lubricating film, and untreated.
(4) Type of oiling: oiled and unoiled.
(5) Coil ID: 508/610mm.
(6) Grade: HX160YD/HX180/BD/HX300LAD; Application: high proof strength for cold forming.

 

 

What is the application of Steel Coil?

There are two sides,one is out side: Workshop, agricultural warehouse, residential precast unit, corrugated roof, roller shutter door, rainwater drainage pipe, retailer booth;the other is inside: Door, doorcase, light steel roof structure, folding screen, elevator, stairway, vent gutter.

EDDS ASTM A653 Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil for cold forming good use CNBM

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Q:Can A Person Recycle Steel?
V J is right when he says that steel is the most recycled commodity on the planet. When the price of steel is high, everyone in the steel recycling and forming industry wants their equipment up and running - that's what keeps my husband employed. You would buy some of the steel for a cruise ship from an industrial roll mill, it would likely need to be 3/8' or more thick, not sure how big the rolls would be. Other steel would be purchased from a bar, angle, flat and channel mill, and still other material for your cruise ship would come from a mill that casts beams and other structural parts. My husband made the hull for a 41' steel sail boat by himself, it was all made from steel materials that were readily available in the Vancouver area of British Columbia, Canada. China sells steel - lots and lots and lots of it.
Q:How can the outer diameter and weight of steel coil be converted?
Of course, the calculation is relatively coarse, and the volume has a lot to do with the tension.
Q:Non-stick saucepans vs. stainless steel?
Non stick doesnt stick but after time the non stick doesnt stay non stick and then time to replace Stainless steel. some things may not stick but its best to put down a little pam, or cooking oil, and or aluminum foil
Q:What are surgical steel earrings ?
Surgical steel is a grade of steel often used in medical appliances like tweezers, forceps, etc. It's generally non-reactive and considered very safe. It doesn't contain any special properties against infection--you still have to observe basic hygiene and clean your piercings properly--but most people can wear surgical steel earrings without a problem. However, if you have a contact allergy to base metals like nickel, surgical steel may cause redness or irritation because of the metals used in it. If cheap rings or necklaces make your skin break out in a rash you should NOT wear surgical steel.
Q:Cold rolled steel coil steel, what is the difference?
Steel rolling process is different from the steel produced naturally different!
Q:Damascus steel knife?
Pattern welded /damascus is too expensive to use as an everyday knife, as it can cost more than silver. It's best kept as a collection piece. You'd be stupid to keep it in your pocket or use it everyday. that would be a waste of money. Knives you use everyday might be lost or stolen, or they may get rusted, worn, or dirty..... ruining their value. From that point of view the strength or edge-holding ability means very little. Specifically, the bushcraft knife is pattern welded steel. True damascus or Wootz steel is something you'll only find in museums and private collections. they stopped making it several hundred years ago. Despite what many people have claimed, Wootz damascus was inferior to modern tool steels in every respect. It was a brittle, dirty material. It's legendary status has more to do with myth and storytelling. The reason they stopped making was undoubtaby because more modern methods came along that produced a more consistent product, more quickly and easily. Old technologies tend to be abandoned for good reasons. With pattern welded steel, about a dozen strips of two different grades of steel have been stacked, welded together, the twisted and forged to create interesting patterns. This more of an artistic process and doesn't improve the properties of modern steels. Pattern welded steel is for the most part, inferior to a homogenous blade made of a single grade of steel. First of all, PW is a handmade product which means there will be faults and oxide inclusions incorporated into the steel. The welding process is not perfect. Secondly, in the hardening and tempering process you end up with a compromise between the properties of the two different grades of steel. You end up with a product that is not quite as good as either steel would have been individually. The blade may either be too brittle or too soft.
Q:question on fatigue testing of steels?
because metals, like steel, are ductile and will stretch before breaking. Straining the metal is stretching it, stressing the metal is applying a shearing force or bending until there is an actual metal failure. A sheet metal strap 1inch across and 24 gauge metal is commonly used to support metal ducting systems in construction. These have an average strain to failure weight load as high as 16,200 lbs. As reported by the smacna index, they will safely hold 6800 pounds. Of more interest is the screws used to hold the strap to the duct. While they are grade 3, fairly strong, they strain to 1400 pounds when properly installed, and are safely able to support 650 pounds, unless they are overtorqued (stripped) and this quickly drops to 400 pounds and 125 pounds...big difference.
Q:can I freeze steel?
Hey man, don't you think it would save more $$$ to cool your coke in the fridge than trying to cool steel? How do you plan on cooling the steel? And you can't freeze steel but you can make it cold. You are just joking right, I hope so anyway?
Q:Why aren't bullets made of steel?
The bullet needs to be a bit malleable to conform to the grooves in the barrel. In an American .30 gun a .308 bullet is forced out of the gun it has to conform to the .30 bore and .308 grooves to form a tight seal. That's why lead and copper are the primary materials of the bullet. A steel bullet in a steel bore would potentially produce a pipe bomb or at least do significant damage to the bore. Also, the weight of bullets are optimized for their application with the current materials. There is no need or desire to reduce the mass of the bullet. Simply reducing mass for increased velocity can effect the terminal ballistics in all kinds of ways, but you cannot assume that damage will be higher for a variety of reasons. If nothing else the fact that the military has INCREASED the 5.56x45mm from 55gr to 62gr should be enough to doubt your claim. Also steel is about 70% the density of lead, so there would not be a major savings in mass, but aluminum is only 25% the density and it is much closer to the hardness of lead. If you really wanted a light bullet, the aluminum may be the way to go.
Q:If you combine stainless steel with gold, does that make stainless gold?
Stainless steel, I believe, was an actual trade name of a british cutlery company's knives, once the ability to create iron-chromium alloys was mastered. Stainless steel's main alloying agent that prevents it from rusting, is Chromium. The Chromium in the steel creates an protective layer (not unlike rust), which acts as a protectant for the rust-prone iron...keeping real rust away. I am no metallurgist, but I have not heard of gold being used as an alloying agent in common steels. I'm not even sure they would mix. Not all metals can be stirred together successfully. Even if gold could be used as an alloying agent for steel, it would need to be in such a small percentage, you would not end up with a metal that was gold in appearance...so it would still look like steel of some sort. The funny part is, gold is already stainless, and does not tarnish or rust as it is.

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