Prepainted Gavanized Steel Coils

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Product Description:

Light weight, anti-corrosion, prevent pollution, applied in many fields




PPGI, SGCC, CGCC, DX51D, DC51D, TDC51D, TS280GP, etc





Inner Diameter


Coil Weight

3-8 Tons

Color Number

RAL Pantone


Top Side: 20-25um

Bottom Side: 8-10um

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Q:carbon steel strength?
Ricki is correct. There is no way to tell how much carbon is present just from the term carbon steel. It comes in a wide range of grades within the general classifications of low, medium, and high carbon steel. What you'll get depends on the quality of the knife. As the carbon content increases, the steel becomes harder, stronger, and more responsive to heat treatment. It also becomes more brittle, so a **very** high carbon steel would not be the best thing for a machete. As Ricki said, plain carbon steels are not rust resistant. However, I have had a carbon steel machete for over 40 years and it's just fine. If you take care of it, it will last.
Q:Carbon Steel/ Stainless Steel knives?
If your talking about a folding pocket knife, I think that it's basically six one way and a half dozen the other. I actually do prefer stainless for my pocket knives. I don't want to oil a knife to the degree I feel carbon requires, only to then stick it my pocket to attract dirt to the knife and oil to my pants. I'm the exact opposite on sheath knives though. I like 1095 carbon steel, plain edge sheath knives. I'll thrash on them HARD, and I rarely have major edge problems. Of course, I require them to be coated with some kind of powder coat or the like, because they can rust, but I do try and keep them clean and dry when in the sheath, so they won't pit the uncoated edge. My reasons for this sheath knife preference is multi-fold. First, these knives are simply affordable. I don't spend $80 dollars on a outdoors sheath knife. I use the tool too hard to want to spend more. I don't like the more traditional stainless steels such as AUS-8, 420HC, and 440C (not to mention the HORRENDOUS 440A) because I feel that the all else being equal, a stainless blade will bend before a carbon blade will break. I also think that carbon holds an edge at least as well, if not better, than traditional stainless, and it's much easier to hone. I don't know much about these new laminates, other than the very hard, but not so tough. They seem to be POSSIBLY too brittle for my use. That, combined with the fact that they cost a FORTUNE, means that I just won't be considering them.
Q:why use steel-reinforced concrete?
Exposed steel requires constant maintenance including inspection and repainting. Steel does not provide a durable driving surface nor a good friction one for stopping unless it is textured, which makes driving on it very noisy. It is not possible to refinish a steel surface as is a concrete surface which can be ground and had several inches of new wear surface in concrete or asphalt added to it. Concrete is much less expensive than steel and the enclosure of steel inside the concrete protects it like a paint job does. Steel is weakened by heat, as was shown by the 9/11 collapses when the applied fire insulation was blasted off the trusses by the crashes, so a burning truck on or under a bridge may damage concrete but leave it standing strong enough to continue handling traffic during repairs, as at overpasses here in Texas where oil tankers crashed and burned.
Q:What Products Have Carbon Steel In Them?
440. 440a. 440c is stainless 420hc is made just for buck knives. aus8 is a stainless steel made In japan. 1095 and 1075 are both high carbon steels 1075 is a little tougher then 1095 but the latter holds a edge better and has been used by Ka-Bar for the army and marine fighting knives since WW2 so 1095 has to be a good steel for the government to use it that long. iv got a 7 inch army 1095 on order know. but there sheaths are made in mexico the knife its self is made in new york
Q:Steel EASY 10 POINTS!?
steel is used for cars and trains. one of the largest steel manufacturers is in my town its called CarTech its in reading pa.
Q:how carbon is being alloyed during steel making?
It's not really that hard. You can use your charcoal grill to do it. First build a large fire in it and then bury the steel in the coals. It'll only take about ten minuites or so for the steel to heat through. Then pick it out of the coals with tongs and drop it into a bucket of water. Repeat as desired. Eventually it'll get as brittle as glass. To fix this, you must anneal the metal. Again heat the metal in the coals, only this time let it stay there until the coals go all the way out all by themselves. Next day when all the way cool, Take it out and clean it off. Viola!, you have hardened steel.
Q:Stainless steel vs carbon steel for swords?
Modern Sword Steels: Stainless - Used in decorative swords and knives. Stainless steel blades longer than twelve inches are too brittle for full contact use. 1045 Carbon - Strong, but soft compared to higher carbon steels. Reasonably cheap and acceptable for full contact use. 1060 Carbon - Harder than 1045, but not brittle. Holds a keen edge and is very durable. Somewhat expensive, but great for full contact use. 1095 Carbon - Sacrifices the durability of lower carbon steels for better edge retention and increased hardness. Somewhat expensive, but tough enough for full contact use. 5160 Spring - Extremely tough and durable. Great for full contact use when properly heat treated. 9260 Spring - Amazingly resilient and durable, but not unbreakable. Excellent for full contact use. T10 Tool - Exceptionally hard and tougher than other steels with similar carbon content. Keeps a good edge without sacrificing durability. Can be expensive, but is still great for full contact use. L6 Bainite - Can be very expensive, but is the toughest steel on the market when properly heat treat. Excellent for full contact use, but requires additional maintenance to prevent rust and corrosion. About Damascus Steel: Historical Damascus blades were made from wootz, an Indian steel with unique properties. The technique for making this type of steel has been lost, but there have been many attempts to recreate it. The patterns found on Damascus steel blades are a direct result of the sword-making process and are not entirely dependent on the type of steel used. Damascus swords were the finest blades of their time.
Q:Is sterling silver safer than surgical steel?
Surgical steel.
Q:Best steel for a all purpose knife?
Fixed Blades: Folding Blades: CPM 3V CPM S35-VN 1095 CPM S30-V 5160 AUS-8 (when it's heat treated right)
Q:What is the molar mass of Steel?
Molar Mass Steel

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