Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil Used for Industry with High Quality

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Loading Port:
Tianjin
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TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
25 m.t.
Supply Capability:
5000 m.t./month

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Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil Used for Industry

 

1.Structure of Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil Description

 

Hot-dip aluzinc steel sheet is substrated on cold rolled steel in various strength and specification. Coating composition is 55% aluminmum in weight ratio, 43.4% zinc, and 1.5% silicon, with excellent and heat resistance performance.


2.Main Features of the Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil

•High Purity

•Easy control and operation 
•High strength

•Fast melting

•Competitive price

•Best Service

 

3. Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil Images

Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil Used for Industry with High Quality

Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil Used for Industry with High Quality

Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil Used for Industry with High Quality

4. Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil Specification

 

Hot-Dip   Aluzinc Steel Coil

Thicknenss

0.16mm-3.5mm

Width       

1250mm   max

Coating   mass

30-185g/

Spangle

Regular/Minimized/Zero   Spangle

Coil   inner diameter 

508-610mm

Surface   treatment

Chromated/non   chromated, Oiled/non oiled, Anti finger print

 

5.FAQ of Hot-Dip Aluzinc Steel Coil

We have organized several common questions for our clientsmay help you sincerely

 

How about your company

A world class manufacturer & supplier of castings forging in carbon steel and alloy steelis one of the large-scale professional investment casting production bases in China,consisting of both casting foundry forging and machining factory. Annually more than 8000 tons Precision casting and forging parts are exported to markets in Europe,America and Japan. OEM casting and forging service available according to customer’s requirements.

 

How to guarantee the quality of the products

We have established the international advanced quality management systemevery link from raw material to final product we have strict quality testWe resolutely put an end to unqualified products flowing into the market. At the same time, we will provide necessary follow-up service assurance.

 

How long can we receive the product after purchase?

In the purchase of product within three working days, We will arrange the factory delivery as soon as possible. The pecific time of receiving is related to the state and position of customers.Commonly 7 to 10 working days can be served.

 


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Q:Can a bear bend steel?
depends on the steel thickness and positioning. frm your question I'm guessing you're not really well versed in steel framing or use... im guessing whatever you build, a bear can destroy. if i was to build it not even 100 bears can destroy it. it doesn't require much steel, it's just about bracing the positing of steel and some design.
Q:mild steel properties?
Mild steel melting point is 1350-1530°C (2462-2786°F). Stainless steel is 1510°C (2750°F)
Q:Is stainless steel magnetic?
There are many types of stainless steel. Some are magnetic and some are non-magnetic. The magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic. Poor heat treatment or high heat input welding of normal or high carbon austenitic stainless steels will cause sensitization, ie formation of chromium carbides. The formation of carbides not only reduces the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel but also tends to form martensite around the carbide. This martensite is magnetic and the more severe the sensitisation, the stronger are the magnetic properties. When nickel is added, for instance, the austenite structure of iron is stabilized. This crystal structure makes such steels non-magnetic and less brittle at low temperatures. Martensitic stainless steels are magnetic. *Wrought, austenitic stainless steels, such as 304 and 316, are generally regarded as non-magnetic in the annealed condition, ie they are not attracted significantly by a magnet. However, if they are cold worked they will be attracted to a permanent magnet. The change occurs because the cold work deformation induces a transformation of the microstructure from austenite to martensite. The effect is less marked in alloys with high concentrations of austenite stabilisers such as nickel, nitrogen and carbon. Once the martensite is formed, it may also become magnetised. *In contrast to the austenitic alloys, ferritic stainless steels such as 409 or 3Cr12/5Cr12 and martensitic stainless steels such as 420, are strongly attracted to a magnet even in the annealed state. The duplex and super-duplex stainless steels will also be strongly attracted because they contain about 50% ferrite in their microstructure. *
Q:Is a aircraft carrier made up mostly of aluminum or steel?
An aircraft carrier is a pretty large hunk of metal. And it's mostly steel... at least its structure and weight bearing surfaces. As I recall, there was quite a bit of aluminum and other light stuff used for cosmetic stuff, like covering on interior bulkheads (walls). But the flight deck is about three football fields of steel... thick steel. Planes landing on an aircraft carrier don't land. They are trapped when their tail hook grabs an arresting cable, and kind of fall out of the sky. When they hit, they need something pretty substantial to break the fall. A carrier displaces an awful lot of water, but, and this is a guess, probably less than 100,000 tons... the one I was on displaced less than 80,000 tons. About 40 feet of it is underwater. Most of its crew live below or very close to the waterline. But there's enough above water to allow for the city that the carrier contains to operate pretty much like any city with a population of about 6,000. It has stores where you can buy almost anything, barbers, a hospital, dentists, doctors, fitness center, theaters, fast food places where you can have a hamburger made to order, restaurants where the food is free, a post office, gas stations, a radio studio and a television studio, newspaper, churches--a chapel as well as other places people can meet to hold religious services, even an airport. I looked at the ship's website. From what little information there is, it looks to be just a few feet larger than the old carrier I was on. If it weighs 500 tons, it has to displace 500 tons. Don't ask me how they do it... unless it was materials used during construction and removed.
Q:whats the benifits of using steel material for fasteners?
Relatively cheap, strong, and non-toxic. For Carbon Steel alloys rust and corrosion are problems. For stainless alloys, cost becomes the problem [and corrosion is not eliminated]
Q:Surgical Steel Piercing Reaction?
The chances of a reaction from the stud is minimal. Surgical steel is an alloy specifically designed to make sterile safe surgical equipment. Often made with titanium or nickel, surgical steel is highly reactive and forms an oxidized layer when made. This layer creates a stable surface. The titanium and nickel are both very hard and resistant to scratches which make for easy sterilization. This will help keep your piercing clean. Be sure to follow the directions you receive when you get your piercing and keep it clean.
Q:Liquid stainless steel paint?
I have never heard of stainless steel paint, but I know that stainless steel is hard to clean and maintain
Q:Lead vs steel chokes?
You should not have done this. It not a matter of shooting fine - it's a question of getting the correct distance and shot pattern SAFELY. Lead only chokes squeeze the lead shot a considerable bit. Lead is compressive and soft - it takes more squeeze to get the correct patterns from a shotgun. Steel only chokes do not squeeze as much as the lead version because the steel is very had and does not compress well. When you accidentally shoot lead through a steel chock the pattern will be weird. But, it usually is not an unsafe condition. However, steel through a lead choke will cause unsafe pressure at the choke and can explode. You end up with a bugs bunny/road runner cartoon looking shotgun! Most gun shops all over the USA are decorated with these blown up shotguns from people doing exactly what you did. Unless you want to add yours to the other dead gun collection in some shop - I recommend you take your shotgun and all your chokes into a gun smith and have him look it all over. See if anything is out of tolerance. Guns are not fool proof. If you do not follow the instructions and operate them safely they will blow up and tear a piece of your body off. Just ask any ER doctor or long time shooter.
Q:Which industries consume the most steel?
Costuuction and auto are most likely the top two.
Q:Are there steel bullets?
Not for small arms and not for conventional artillery. In both cases, the projectile has to engage the rifling, which requires a material soft enough to upset into the grooves yet tough enough to stand up to the friction and the pressure. Small arms projectiles, even if the core is steel, must have at least a jacket of softer material, usually a copper alloy, to engage the rifling and seal the bore. Artillery projectiles for rifled weapons use driving bands of bronze or a similar alloy for the same reason. The Germans during World War II and probably some other resource-strapped armed services have used sintered iron bullets for handgun rounds such as 9mm Luger (I have a box, but have never shot one because of their value to collectors), but sintered iron is too fragile for the higher velocities and energies of rifle rounds. Several companies do make sporting bullets entirely of copper, which is a way to solve the problem conventional bullets sometimes have with shedding the jacket on impact with a game animal. You'll also find lots of foreign military ammo with cartridge cases made of mild steel. Russian and Chinese 7.62x39 often has these steel cases. You'll find tens of thousands of them rusting on the ground at rifle ranges all over the country. The bullets have a softer jacket, usually a copper alloy. Armor-piercing ammo has a core of hardened steel, but a jacket of copper alloy.

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