Hot Dipped Galvanized Steel Coil/Sheet-EN10327 DX51D+Z

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Tianjin
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Product Description:

Galvanized steel coils are widely used in the construction industry, as raw material for the production of corrugated panels, fencing products, drywall panel profiles, ventilation systems etc. Recommended for both outside and inside usage, galvanized steel has a high resistance to corrosion in different environments, due to a protective layer of zinc of 100 180 grams per square metre.


Galvanized steel sheet /coil features:

1. Zinc coating :60-220g/m2( as required)

2. Thickness:0.13-3.0mm
3. Width:600-1250mm(900mm,1215mm,1250mm,1000mm the most common)

4. Coil id:508mm

5. Coil weight: 3-5MT(as required)

6. Surface:regular/mini/zero spangle, chromated, skin pass, dry etc.

7. Application: With excellent cold bending molded manufacturablity, good decoration effect, strong anti-corrosion ability, galvanized steel coils and sheets are also pollution-free and easily recycled. Accordingly, they can be used as final products and basic plates of color coated steel coils and widely applied in construction, home appliances, decoration, ect.


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Q:A question about steel.....?
As first answer says, if you look at the number of commercial steel alloys available and consider that any given alloy can be heat treated to a wide range of physical properties, there are thousands and thousands of potential combinations. Technically, steel is an alloy of Fe and C but there are Fe-C alloys that are called cast irons, not steel, and... there are lots of alloy steels which have significant amounts of other elements added like Cr, Ni, Nb, V, Mo, etc. Fe alloys that have a lot of Cr and or Ni added are called stainless steels and there are dozens of them and many of them can be heat treated to produce a wide range of properties. As far as the strongest or the weakest, you have to get really specific about exactly what you mean because some steels are designed for room temperature properties, some are designed for elevated temperature properties, some for static loads, some for impact loads, some for wear resistance, etc, etc.. Steels make up the largest family of metal alloys (by weight and by volume) that humans use. There are a number of reasons for this but the big reasons include: 1) there is a LOT of iron on earth 2) it is relatively cheap to produce 3) you can easily change the physical properties over a every wide range. As an example... you can take a piece of steel that is so brittle it will shatter if you drop it on the floor and heat treat it so you can bend it like a pretzel without cracking and then heat treat it again to make it very strong and tough (resistant to fracture).
Q:Does steel contain nickel?
Yes. Different alloys contain differing amounts.
Q:Stainless Steel Used In Knifes?
There okorder.com/ Stainless steel doesn't make the best knife blade. It doesn't sharpen as sharp or hold its edge as well. High carbon steel is better, but it rusts and discolors very easily so it's not as popular. A new thing (actually not new but popular these days) is to use a 'sandwich' of high carbon steel between two layers of stainless. So the actual edge is high carbon steel but the blade looks like stainless. I have some kitchen knives made this way (kind of expensive) and I love them. This same technique was used in Japanese katanas, swords used by samurai warriors.
Q:Foam Steel Characteristics and use?
Foam steel [often steel foam] is used in applications that require light weight but high rigidity and strength. Watertight doors on modern ships are often made of foam steel. Pressure doors on aircraft are possible uses. As we keep striving for lighter weights in cars, foam steel might have some useful applications in bodies. There is a technical paper online that is in .pdf format that has a good discussion of the process and characteristics of foam steel.
Q:steel or graphite?
I use steel shaft golf clubs (mens so called clubs) I find the garphite shaft that is typically used for womens clubs is too light and I have a messy swing Callaway Big Bertha is GREAT .... very forgiving club and the oversized clubhead is great for beginners up to advanced. *****FOR MEN - STEEL******* no graphite (just the woods have graphite shafts but the irons are steel
Q:turps and stainless steel?
real s/steel is nickel and chrome, however manufacturers of kitchenware, e.g s/teel cutlery use the cheaper version of nickel chrome and iron, that is why some s/steel products rust, so if you want to test any products carry asmall magnet and test the article
Q:Steel pipe info please...?
you can search for some web which sells steel pipe and other relative products to know more details.
Q:mild steel properties?
Be *real cautious* using HCL round stainless. A lowering acid like HCL will wreck down the oxide layer on the stainless, and corrosion will proceed. So far as i do know, there is not any scale down level at which HCL will not attack the skin oxide, however at very low concentrations maybe somewhat rust/pitting/corrosion is not going to be a main issue. Oxidizing acids like nitric, and to a couple measure sulfuric, will passivate stainless under the right conditions. But on simple, mild steels, corrosion will proceed to form FeCl and FeSO4 corrosion merchandise. The corrosion will haven't any outcomes on tensile, hardness or affect until ample fabric has been eliminated via corrosion to make a measurable change. Hydrogen embrittlement is a likelihood if there's constant anxiety, and hydrogen is advanced in corrosion. Whether or not it is a challenge would rely on the drawback.
Q:Is acrylic plastic good for bath tubs or steel ?
Acrylic or fiberglass is best, the contractor probably told you steel because it may be cheaper. Acrylic can be repaired and or painted if you decide to change colors at a later date. Steel is the older cheaper technology and cast iron is way too heavy to mess with now.
Q:STEEL STRINGS ON CLASSICAL GUITAR?
NO. A classical guitar is braced very differently than a steel-string acoustic. Plus the set-up is completely exceptional - the best way the nut is slotted, the best way the strings tie on the bridge, and so on. The anxiety of steel strings would pull the bridge and top off of a just right classical guitar. Although it's a mass-produced cheap person who would take the tension - you'll certainly not be capable to play it - the action on a nylon string guitar is far better in most cases. Who cares how long strings last - you're talking about $5-10 for a suite of strings. Changing strings is part of playing guitar.

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