Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil Good Quality

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Loading Port:
Shanghai
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
50 m.t.
Supply Capability:
10000 m.t./month

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1. Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil Description:

Hot-dip galvanized steel coil are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial application.

2.Main Features of the Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil:

• Excellent process capability

• Smooth and flat surface

• Workability, durability

• Excellent heat resistance performance

• High strength

• Good formability

• Good visual effect

 

3.Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil Images

 

 

4.Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil Specification

Standard: AISI, ASTM, BS, DIN, GB, JIS

Grade: SPCC, SPCD, Q195, DX51D

Thickness: 0.15-5.0mm

Model Number: coil

Type: Steel Coil

Technique: Cold Rolled

Surface Treatment: Galvanized

Application: Container Plate

Special Use: High-strength Steel Plate

Width: 600-1250mm

Length: depends

commodity: hot dipped galvanized steel coil

technique: cold rolled

thickness: 0.15-5.0mm

width: 600-1500mm

surface treatment: galvanized

zinc coating: 50-275g/m2

coil weight: 3-7 tons

coil ID: 508/610mm

spangle: zero spangle, regular spangle, small spangle, big spangle

payment term: by L/C or T/T

5.FAQ of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil

What’s the application of this product?

There are many applications for this product. For example, roofing, cladding, decking, tiles, sandwich walls, etc.

What’s the coating composition of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil?

The coating composition is 55% aluminium in weight ratio, 43.4% zinc, and 1.5% silicon, with excellent corrosion and heat resistance performance.

 

 

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Q:How do I clean stainless steel?
Use stainless steel cleaner which you can get at hardware stores, Home Depot, and Lowes.
Q:Can jet fuel melt steel?
Not likely -- the melting point of steel is about 1500 degrees Celsius, while the hottest jet fuel burns at is about 825 degrees Celsius (and its usually way below that). If you're one of those people wondering why the collapse in 9/11 ... it's quite possible that the temperatures and heat inside the buildings were way about the melting point of steel in some places. But it would not be just because of burning jet fuel. And, planes carry a lot of material that can catch fire at relatively low temperatures, but which can give off a huge amount of heat (and reach high temperatures), which would contribute to melting and burning of mild steel.
Q:Where can I get steel toe shoes in Surrey uk?
by on the internet or ppe clothing shops
Q:Was steel discovered after bronze?
Bronze The earliest surviving iron artifacts, from the 5th millennium BC in Iran and 2nd millennium BC in China, were made from meteoric iron-nickel. By the end of the 2nd millennium BC iron was being produced from iron ores from South of the Saharan Africa to China. Steel (with a smaller carbon content than pig iron but more than wrought iron) was first produced in antiquity. New methods of producing it by carburizing bars of iron in the cementation process were devised in the 17th century. In the Industrial Revolution, new methods of producing bar iron without charcoal were devised and these were later applied to produce steel. In the late 1850s, Henry Bessemer invented a new steelmaking process, involving blowing air through molten pig iron, to produce mild steel. This and other 19th century and later processes have led to wrought iron no longer being produced. The earliest tin-alloy bronzes date to the late 4th millennium BC in Susa (Iran) and some ancient sites in China, Luristan (Iran) and Mesopotamia (Iraq).
Q:Car accident with a steel mailbox?
Let me get this straight. You were driving too fast for conditions, lost control due to driving too fast, hit a stationary mailbox, car is totaled due to driving too fast for conditions, and you want to be reimbursed? Sorry, you are dead wrong. It is your duty to maintain control of your car at all times. If there was any damage to the mailbox, you are the one liable.
Q:Galvanised Steel Questions?
Wipe the powder of and the rest should be safe, unless you stub your toe on the rusty metal.
Q:Can you leave steel paintless?
It depends on the steel, assuming your bike isn't aluminum. Since your bike isn't likely made of stainless steel or weathering steel, it really ought to be protected from the elements. You can do this in different ways. I've seen bare metal last many years in the weather with a regular dousing of oil. I've even seen a guy just pour his used motor oil over his battered old truck. Now don't be misled - the truck looked like hot buttered hell, but the steel was all good on a fifty year old truck. Those are real world results and if you don't mind the oil staining the inner thighs of your pants so it looks like you had an accident on the way to wherever, it's an option. Or you can paint it back, only in clear coat.
Q:when was steel first made?
Even in very early iron, a small amount of steel was produced by carburization, where the iron picks up carbon by laying in hot coals before quenching. This produces a thin layer of steel on the surface of the iron. By about 300 BC Damascus steel was being produced by the crucible method on the Indian subcontinent, and the Romans used steel from Noricum. In the first century BC the Chinese were melting cast iron and wrought iron together to make steel.
Q:Site that tells the history of Stainless Steel dining Utensils?
The development of 18/10 stainless steel was the brainchild of Harry Brearley who, in 1913, was working on a project to prevent rifle barrels from corroding so much during use. His analysis of the rifle barrels involved having to dissolve them in acid but, by chance, he noticed that steel which had a high chromium content did not dissolve in the acid. He experimented with varying proportions of chromium and finally produced a stainless steel with 12.8% chromium. He moved to Thos Firth Sons in 1914 and commercial production of stainless steel cutlery began. Refinements were necessary because early versions of stainless steel knives were harder to produce and polish, and they would not cut as well as the existing knives.
Q:What is the amount of Iron found in Steel?
Graphite is a lot lighter and will allow you to generate more swing speed and probably greater distance. I hit my graphite clubs about one club longer than my steel shafts. But, my steel shafts are far more accurate. I find I hit a lot more greens in regulation using my steel shafted irons than I do with my graphites. Since accuracy is far more important than distance for most people, I choose the steel shafted irons most of the time. You will NEVER see a professional or a low handicapper using graphite irons for this reason.

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