Black Plastic Nursery Plug Trays Cell Seed Tray of 32 105

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China main port
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TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
3000 pc
Supply Capability:
2000000 pc/month

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Product Description:

 Specification of Plug Trays HIPS Made Plastic Plug Tray  for Greenhouse (Growing and Seedling):

Black Plastic Nursery Plug Trays Cell Seed Tray of 32 105

 

Features of Plug Trays HIPS Made Plastic Plug Tray  for Greenhouse (Growing and Seedling):

 ·         Material:      HIPS

·         Thickness:  0.5mm-1.5mm, Standard:1mm

·         Weight:       80g(±5)g-230g(±5)g, Standard weight:155g(±5)g

·         Size:            length:490mm-540mm, width:190mm-345mm,depth:25mm-150mm

·                             Standard:540mmX280mm

·         Cell count:  18-512

·         Package:     In Carton

·         Warrenty:    8-10 times

 

Packaging & Delivery

Packing Detail: export standard carton or large bags

Delivery time: 4 million per momth after receipt of deposit

 

 Advantage:

Waterproof, UV-resistant, extrusion-resistant

Easy carry for young seeding plant and grow

 

Service:

 

1. Quick, efficient and professional response within 24 hours, 14 hours online services

 2. 10 years manufacturing and exporting experience in agriculture field.

 3. Technical support and solution by chief engineer.

 4. Strict quality control system & team, high reputation in the market.

 5. Full range of irrigation products for choice

 6. OEM/ODM services

 7. Accept sample order before Mass Order

 

 

Picture of Plug Trays HIPS Made Plastic Plug Tray  for Greenhouse (Growing and Seedling):

 

Black Plastic Nursery Plug Trays Cell Seed Tray of 32 105

Black Plastic Nursery Plug Trays Cell Seed Tray of 32 105

 

 

FAQ of Plug Trays HIPS Made Plastic Plug Tray  for Greenhouse (Growing and Seedling):

Q: 1.How long is the production time?

A: Usually one to two weeks.

 

Q: 2.How is the seed tray being packaged?

A: They can be packaged in carton or pallets. Carton size is 1375px*725px*1250px.

 

Q:3.How many times can the seed tray be used?

A: Under the same environment, it is decided by the thickness. Usually 0.6mm thickness can be used for 1 or 2 times.

1.0 thickness can be used for 3-4 times. 1.5 thickness can be used for 8-10 times.

 

 

 

 

 

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Q:Plastic Man question...?
He does have a son. The son's powers were developing, and he was getting involved with the wrong side of the law. Batman brought Plas in to help. I have it packed away so I don't know the exact issue number, but it was from the last run of Justice League, about 2 years ago.
Q:How long does it take for plastic to decompose?
Plastic takes CENTURIES to decompose. The reason is this: plastic's chemical composition is purely hydrogen and carbon. The problem is the way the atoms are bonded. The bonds are very strong. Everything natural has a way to be built up and then decomposed. Because plastics are human made, nature doesn't have a ready made solution to breakdown the molecules and recycle them. Thus, we have billions of tons of waiste matter scattered all over Mother Earth, because mankind thinks they own everything. (The truth is we don't.)
Q:friendly plastic help!?
No where. No type of plastic is friendly (unless it's BPA-free, but even then, it's still plastic). There are, however, other friendly resources such as: Aluminum (which can still have BPA, but isn't as bad as plastic) Stainless steel Glass Complex Carbonate (which is basically the same as plastic, so it's not much better)
Q:Floating Plastics..?
That would have to depend on how the plastic was to be used, wouldn't it? If, for example, you wanted to place a marker in the water so you know where your crab trap was set, you would want it to float. If, on the other hand, the crab trap was made of plastic and you wanted it to stay on the bottom, you would want it to sink. So the answer to your question really depends on the use to which the plastic will be put.
Q:Plastic shrapnel versus metallic/glass?
Plastic won't have the range of metallic shrapnel, nor will it have the penetration capabilities. As far as glass goes, I wouldn't it except in foodstuffs/water (yes, if you're gonna talk about IEDs, might as well talk of sabotaging someone's dinner, too). I would use plastics unless there was a risk of my target using a metal detector.
Q:What are the 6 most common plastics?
Thermo Plastics (soften when heated): Polyethylene, Polyvinyl chloride, Polypropylene, Polystyrene, Polyethylene terephalate, Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, Polymethyl methacrylate, Polyamide. Thermosetting Plastics (release heat as they harden): Polyurethane, Phenolic, Melamine-formaldehyde, Urea-formaldehyde, Polyester, Epoxy. There are the names of 14 plastics I could remember. I have no idea how to figure out which are the six most popular. Perhaps you should do a search on each one, with an additional parameter to narrow the search. For example, Polyethylene+ global-annual-production Don't use the quotation marks; no space before but one space after the plus; no spaces before or after the hyphen. Once you know the global annual production of each type, you could rank them in order and find the most popular types. Why do teachers ask such idiotic questions? They sound so easy, but finding the true facts is always nearly impossible. Why couldn't they just say, Name six common plastics. Oh well, it's your problem, not mine. Oops! Forgot the last part of the question. It is generally impossible to describe the appearance of a particular type of plastic. Their names refer to the chemical structure of their molecules and their appearance depends largely on techniques used during manufacture. Another idiotic teacher question, hopelessly vague and nearly impossible to answer. Again, it's your problem. Bye....................
Q:plastic bumper bars ?
a little more information would have been usefull a plastic bull bar is not really usefull as it will crack and shatter upon inpact and as for a plastic bumper bar it,s only handy as it bends and flexes. i don,t really know where you want to go with this so i volunteer that i have a massive allround 4 post heavy duty aluminium bull bar which is also useless at high speed collisions as it bends into the front tyres causing them to deflate where upon i would lose control of the steering and a plastic one would not do this but it makes no sense to fit them either. the difference between a bullbar and a bumperbar is that the bullbar should surround the head lights from left to right where upon a bumper bar is just that.
Q:How to make a Plastic?
I don't know if this would really be that good of a tough plastic but fusing a lot of plastic bags makes it pretty hard. Just get some plastic bags on top of each other, sandwich them between parchment (or wax, but preferably parchment) and iron it for about 20 to 30 seconds on a medium heat always making sure that the iron is constantly moving,
Q:what is the chemical formula for plastic?
Plastics cover a tremendous breadth of compounds that start of as monomers of low molecular weight carbon containing compounds. So whether it is PVC, Lexan, carbonate plastics, soda bottles, water bottles, milk jugs, etc., there will be different monomers that are used. Each of the symbols on a plastic bottle represents a different category of plastics, meaning different starting monomers. So category 1 is quite different from category 7. The link is of the most common categories, but it lists the name, not the formula.
Q:What were uses for plastic?
Plastics existed before Bakelite, but Bakelite was the first completely synthetic material. It was first used for electrical insulators, later for billiard balls and the casings for the old big black telephones that people used to use. Many uses were subsequently found for it, replacing steel and wood for various manufactured items, from combs, pens, dishes and toys, to artillery casings and propellers. Today there are thousands of different plastics made in a great variety of ways. Most plastics are hydrocarbons, and can be made from just about any carbon-rich substance. Coal tar, petroleum and natural gas are all commonly used as feedstock for plastic making. An excellent book on the subject is Plastic, the making of the Synthetic Century by Stephen Fenichell, published by Harper Collins

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