Steel ASTM A653 Hot-Dip Zinc-Coated Steel Coil CNBM

Ref Price:
Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
20 m.t.
Supply Capability:
3000 m.t./month

OKorder Service Pledge

Quality Product

Order On-line Tracking

Timely Delivery

OKorder Service Pledge

Credit Rating

Credit Services

Credit Purchasing

Share to:

Product Description:

Quick Details

  • Standard: ASTM

  • Grade: FS Type A and B

  • Type: Steel Coil

  • Surface Treatment: Galvanized

  • Application: Forming steel

  • Width: 600-1534mm

  • Length: Coil

Packaging & Delivery

Packaging Details:Oscillated wound: one coil per bundle, inner is the protecting humidity-proof wax paper. Medium is plastic film. Outer is sackcloth or compound paper packing. Coil to be laid on single type pallet (one pile per pallet)
Delivery Detail:Depends on specification and order quanity.

Specifications:

(1) Regular spangle, minimized spangle and skin-pass. 
(2) Chromate and Chromate-free passivation. 
(3) Oiled and unoiled. 

 Feature:

(1) Type of zinc coating finish: regular spangle, minimized spangle and skin-pass.  
(2) Types of surface qualities: as coated surface, improved surface and best quality surface.
(3) Surface treatment: chemically passivated, chromate-free passivation, phosphate, anti-finger print, phosphateand, self lubricating film, and untreated.

ainting structure

Top surface

Bottom surface


Primer coating

No coating

1/0

Primer coating

Primer coating

1/1

Primer coating + Finish coating

No coating

2/0

Primer coating + Finish coating

Primer coating or single back coating

2/1

Primer coating + Finish coating

Primer coating + Finish back coating

2/2

What is the application of Steel Coil?

There are two sides,one is out side: Workshop, agricultural warehouse, residential precast unit, corrugated roof, roller shutter door, rainwater drainage pipe, retailer booth;the other is inside: Door, doorcase, light steel roof structure, folding screen, elevator, stairway, vent gutter.

Steel ASTM A653 Hot-Dip Zinc-Coated Steel Coil  CNBM


Send a message to us:

Remaining: 4000 characters

- Self introduction

- Required specifications

- Inquire about price/MOQ

Q:What are the characteristics of hot-rolled steel coils and cold rolled steel coils? What loading and unloading tools should be used? What items should be paid attention to?
When placing materials to roll on both sides of the main pad wood pallets, prevent rolling back and forth. In addition the floor should be thickened, cannot have uneven or debris, because the line of steel coils when gravity concentrated in contact with the ground floor, there is a fracture easily, debris, easy to leave the indentation in the steel roll.
Q:Is carbon steel a type of alloy?
Carbon steels are alloys. This is evident in the carbon-iron phase diagram:
Q:WHY Is diamond stronger than steel?
Diamonds okorder.com
Q:WHAT IS CR-NI STEEL ?
chromium nickle steel aka stainless steel exact amount of chrome and nickle will determine type/grade numbers Check the google for steel type/grade Never head of aircraft grade, however,, there is marine grade - normally baltic birch with waterproof glue and no defects i.e. knots, etc. Very strong (also quite expensive) but worth it for the correct applications
Q:is CS material is comes under Mild steel? any difference?
CS is a noxious gas that I have tasted. If it is spec mild steel then do so.
Q:Steel and Graphite shafts?
Actually it isnt so much whether its steel or graphite, although in the past steel was stiffer as a rule. Today many graphite shafts (depending on the shaft manufacturer) are in fact stiffer then some steel shafts. IE proforce XS vs true temper R You also have to look at the kick point in the shaft. The kick point is where the shaft bends at moment of impact. My shafts are tipped lower because I custom made them that way because I typically hit the ball low to begin with. High kick point means lower ball flight and lower means a higher flight. Also different brands have different stiffness' some regular shafts you'll find feel stiffer then other stiff shafts. the only way to tell if its the shaft is to have all the same shafts installed with the same kickpoint hope this helps
Q:what grade stainless steel is used for revolvers?
*Rifle barrels are usually made from steel alloys called ordinance steel, nickel steel, chrome-molybdenum steel, or stainless steel, depending upon the requirements of the cartridge for which they are chambered. The higher the pressure and velocity of a cartridge (pressure and velocity usually go up together), the faster it will wear out a barrel. To give a satisfactory service life, barrels for high velocity cartridges must me made from tougher and harder steel than barrels for lower pressure cartridges. *The 400 (416) series SS commonly known as ordnance grade , is what barrels are made from . *If you want your barrel to be made from super alloy then it is 718 Inconel ,but a costly affair.
Q:Conductivity question for electricity through stainless steel?
Stainless steel is not such a good conductor as copper and the only metal with better conductivity is silver. Additionally, stainless steel will corrode in certain very corrosive environments without the presence of oxygen - i.e. when immersed in salt water. If you're getting problems caused by corrosion of the copper contacts you use there may well be a trade off so my advice is to do a trial and see what works best. You can check the conductivity of metals by simple online search for the period table:
Q:British Steel Logo?
Great album... British Steel, Um probably check Ebay... I'm not sure if any local stores would have it.
Q:1944 Steel Penny?
Weigh it. I'm not an expert on coins, but if the 1944 was 100% steel, I would expect it to weigh something different then modern pennies. Another test would be to measure the resistance with a micro-ohm meter. This is a specialized device that can measure resistance to a millionth of an ohm. Steel should have a different resistance than the metals used on other pennies. Here are some comments from wikipedia: In 1943, at the peak of World War II, cents of zinc-coated steel were made for a short time due to war demands for copper. A few (the U.S. Mint reports forty) copper cents from 1943 were produced from the 1942 planchets remaining in the bins. Similarly, some 1944 steel cents have been reported. Following 1943, salvaged ammunition shells made their way into the minting process, and it was not uncommon to see coins featuring streaks of brass or having a considerably darker finish than other issues.

1. Manufacturer Overview

Location
Year Established
Annual Output Value
Main Markets
Company Certifications

2. Manufacturer Certificates

a) Certification Name  
Range  
Reference  
Validity Period  

3. Manufacturer Capability

a)Trade Capacity  
Nearest Port
Export Percentage
No.of Employees in Trade Department
Language Spoken:
b)Factory Information  
Factory Size:
No. of Production Lines
Contract Manufacturing
Product Price Range