hot-dip galvanized/ Aluzinc steel in good Quality

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Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications.

Production of cold formed corrugated sheets and profiles for roofing, cladding, decking, tiles, sandwich walls, rainwater protective systems, air conditioning duct as well as electrical appliances and engineering.


1.Mateials:SGCC,DX51D /   DX52D /S250,280GD  

2.Size:width:600-1250mm(900mm,1215mm,1250mm,1000mm the most common)


    length:1000-6000mm,as your require

3.Zinc coating :60-180g( as required)

4.Coil id:508mm

5.Coil weight: 3-5MT(as required)

6. Surface:regular/mini/zero spangle, chromated, skin pass, dry etc.

 Applications : 

Galvalume Coil widely used for roofing products, It is also the ideal base material for Prepainted Steel Coil.

1.      roofing

2.      gutters

3.      unexposed automotive parts

4.      appliances

5.      furniture 

6.      outdoor cabinetry



hot-dip galvanized/ Aluzinc steel in good Quality


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Q:Who invented the steel windmill?
The Steel Eclipse Type WG was the first of several self-oiling steel windmills marketed by Fairbanks, Morse, and Company after they became the distributor of all the Eclipse mills about the start of the 20th Century. It has the more important distinction of having been the only widely distributed worm-gear mill in the history of American windmill manufacture. Produced from about 1926 to the mid-1930's, the Steel Eclipse remains in the field today in considerable number in most parts of the country. Hope this helps!
Q:is batman in man of steel?
Q:Wolf steel cased .223 for mini 14???
Wolf's steel cased ammo isn't bad as practice/plinking ammo, especially for the price, as long as you give your weapons MULTIPLE, THOROUGH cleanings between uses, to be sure and remove ALL the gas fouling left by the Wolf components. HOWEVER.................. As Wolf steel cases are lacquer coated, DO NOT leave a round in a hot chamber, even during short pauses between stages of fire on the range, as the lacquer coating WILL melt, and cause the round to seize in the chamber, causing extraction and jamming problems, especially if the weapon is allowed to cool down with the round left in the chamber. Be extra diligent in removing this lacquer fouling when cleaning the weapon later. I have personally seen other shooters have the case rims ripped off spent cases in the chambers, causing a trip to the gunsmith to have the stuck case removed without damaging the weapon's chamber and actioin, at no minor expense.
Q:fallout 3 broken steel?
Yes, Broken Steel is the only DLC that raises your level cap. Yes, you have to complete the main quest to play it. It's kind of a prologue to the events of the ending. If you don't have the DLC and complete the game it just ends and you can't play it anymore. With the DLC you'll be able to continue playing. As for which one to get, that's your preference. Most people like the Broken Steel because it has to do with the main story and it raises the level cap - so that's the one I'll suggest to you. I also think The Pitt and Point Lookout are worth getting as well. Mothership Zeta is the one I liked least. I thought it was kind of stupid, to be honest. Operation Anchoarge is a simulation and it's pretty fun, but I don't think it's worth the $9.99.
Q:Does steel make its own static electricity?
If you sprinkle iron filings near a bar magnet (on paper, etc.) the filings will try to line up with the magnetic field (because iron atoms behave like tiny magnets). Bringing the compass near steel (mainly iron with a little carbon) will cause the iron to try to align with the magnet of the compass needle, however, because the needle is free to swing it also aligns with the magnetic field set up between the needle and steel. Any static electricity would have nil effect on the magnetic field.
Q:Steel Making Process?
From what I understand of it, US steel is better as the steel is more recycled than Canadian, so a lot of that oxygen / CO2 has already taken place compared to working from ore. The second reason US steel is environmentally ahead of Canadian is that US tends to use Electric Arc, while Canadian uses Basic Oxygen, Basic Oxygen uses more energy than electric arc, and I think it also uses more oxygen, but I would suspect that oxygen that it uses is 'waste oxygen' and not converted into Co2 because the Co2 process is limited by the carbon, and steel only has so much carbon.
Q:were the twin towers made from reinforced steel?
Reinforced Steel is found in concrete, and if the towers were built with reinforced concrete (concrete beams with rebar) then they would likely still be standing. The twin towers were made of steel. When steel is heated up, it deforms and collapses, which is why it didnt stand up. One of the top 2 things against steel is that it is not fire resistant.
Q:Stainless Steel lock?
It's hard to give you a quantitative answer. There are different grades of testing standards for padlocks. It comes under the ASTM F883. You need to be more specific. The link only gives a picture and no details about the lock. But in general, stainless steel locks are pretty darn strong. Also, you are under the wrong impression about steel vs iron. Iron is a component of steel. Pure iron is very ductile and is softer than steel. Cast iron, is very hard, but is also very brittle and has limited uses. In general, mild steel is realitively soft and ductile. But, there are many different alloys of steel and some have hardnesses and strengths higher than cast iron. Stainless steel is typically more ductile that mild steel because of the smaller amount of iron in the recipe. There are exceptions to that as well. The 400 series of stainless steels have higher amounts of iron and can be heat treated to hardnesses equaling the better steel alloys.
Q:how carbon is being alloyed during steel making?
Steel is usually made in a two-step process. As you may know, carbon, in the form of coke, is added to the iron ore during the initial smelting process. This is the first step. The conversion of iron ore into raw iron is accomplished with a blast furnace. Carbon dissolves with the iron during the smelting process. The amount of carbon in the iron is generally not controlled at this point as this would be too difficult, the excess carbon is removed in the next step. The result is pig iron which is crude iron that has a very high carbon content, and a large amount of impurities. Pig iron is almost as brittle as glass, and it is useless in this form. In most modern steelmaking operations, molten pig iron is tapped from the blast furnace three or four times per day- it is not allowed to cool. The liquid pig iron is carried in ladles directly to a Basic Oxygen Furnace which converts the pig iron into steel. The basic oxygen converter uses a stream of pure oxygen to burn off the excess carbon. Impurities are also burned off, particularly phosphorus, silicon, and sulfur (which damage the steel's properties.) These elements all have a much higher affinity for oxygen than iron does, so the iron itself remains unchanged. Once the carbon content and the impurities are reduced to the desired level. The oxygen is shut off, and the iron has now become steel. At this point other alloying elements may be added, such as chromium, manganese, or molybdenum. These elements improve the steel's properties, but also add to it's price. If necessary, more carbon can be added as well if the carbon content has accidentally dropped too low. Finally, molten steel from the basic oxygen furnace is poured off. It can be cast into ingots, billets, or thin slabs.
Q:how can you temper steel?
You can't temper all steels. Generally the material must be a high-carbon or tool steel. Different alloys temper differently, and tempering is usually done to get a specific set of characteristics, so you must know what you are working with and use the right methods and temperature. If you do it wrong, the material may be hard but too brittle for the purpose or have other issues. It can be simple, such as heating to a dull red, carbonizing the surface (use an acetylene rich flame until it blackens the surface) and oil quenching. Do that to a piece of tool steel (like a screwdriver) and it will case (surface) harden it to the point you can't scratch it with a file. Tempering changes the way the molecular structure in the metal is linked and oriented.

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