hot-Dip Galvanized/ Aluzinc Steel in SGCC grade in China

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Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
100 m.t.
Supply Capability:
5000000 m.t./month

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Description:

Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications.

Specifcation:


1.Mateials:SGCC,DX51D /   DX52D /S250,280GD  

2.Size:width:600-1250mm(900mm,1215mm,1250mm,1000mm the most common)

    thickness:0.15-2.0mm

    length:1000-6000mm,as your require

3.Zinc coating :60-180g( as required)

4.Coil id:508mm

5.Coil weight: 3-5MT(as required)

6. Surface:regular/mini/zero spangle, chromated, skin pass, dry etc.



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hot-Dip Galvanized/ Aluzinc Steel in SGCC grade in China

hot-Dip Galvanized/ Aluzinc Steel in SGCC grade in China


We can ensure that stable quality standards are maintained, strictly meeting both market requirements and customers’ expectations. Our products enjoy an excellent reputation and have been exported to Europe, South-America, the Middle-East, Southeast-Asia, Africa and Russia etc.. We sincerely hope to establish good and long-term business relationship with your esteemed company.

 

 

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Q:is stainless steel plated or alloyed/mixed?
stainless steel is an alloy normally iron with additions of C, Mn, Ni, Cr, and Nb - amounts added depend on properties required. Corrosion resistance is due to a very thin but dense layer of chromium oxide which forms at the surface and prevents further attack. Ordinary steel on the other hand becomes coated with a porous layer of iron oxide(rust) through which the atmosphere can pass and cause further corrosion.
Q:What does buns of steel mean in this sentence?
Means you will have a nice booty, but the true question is... What does Buns of Steel mean by several times and SOON? Good luck.
Q:Are there different types of steel that are used in construction of beach houses that withstand corrosion?
No, usually they are just coated or galvanized. To make a steel that is truly more corrosion resistant raises it's cost quite markedly, where as coatings are pretty cheap. Almost all structural steel is just A36 mild steel (like 0.1% carbon, 0.05% Mn, and not much else). There are higher grades of structural steel, and bridges are made with truly more corrosion resistant carbon steels, but for a house it's just not the case.
Q:Question about building buildings with a steel frame.?
Most of the parts are cut, welded, and fabricated indoors in a welding shop at another location. Then they're trucked to the site and simply need to be bolted together. This is made possible through the use of computer aided design and modeling programs, so that parts can be made to fit almost presciently in the field. They buy the steel from steel companies. I couldn't tell you exactly where it comes from, you'd have to ask the contractors themselves.
Q:Is Tempered Steel synonymous with Hardened Steel?
Hardening is the preliminary process. The fully hardened state may be far too brittle for practical use. The tempering process is tailored to reduce the actual hardness, to introduce more flexible alloys. The tempering method employed may be done at relatively low temperatures, but some alloys require prolonged soaking at elevated temperatures. Some may be cooled in air, but others may require quenching to end the process.
Q:Finding Steel for hobby welding?
They will sell any quantity of metal and even cut it to size - my experience has been that their prices are not wildly out of line for single pieces of full length stock compared to buying singles where you have to buy a minimum. They also may have sizes that ordinary places consider odd. I was looking for 5/8 square 16 gauge and was told it would have to be shipped in from Houston (to Dallas) by my nearest supplier and found it in stock at MetalSM. But check if you get something odd - the 5/8 cost more than 3/4 at both places and MetalSM actually gave me 3/4 but took it back even though I had cut it. Also check the regular steel suppliers in your area as well as retail welders metal supply places.
Q:what caused my stainless steel sink to get rust spots?
Stainless Steel is the marketing name. For truth in advertising, it should be called Stain Resistant Steel. It should be easy to scrub rust away with an SOS or Brillo pad. To prevent rust from recurring: * thoroughly rinse all chloride containing soaps away * scour the sink at least weekly to remove any residues * if the water source has high mineral content—especially iron—more frequent sink scouring is needed, plus towel drying the sink. * don't allow salt to remain in the sink—rinse it out
Q:how to clean old steel coins?
if you collect coins, you need to learn that they must never be cleaned. cleaning, while it might make them look pretty, ruins their value as a collectable. ask your coin dealer.
Q:Steel mine question help!!!?
There's no such thing as a Steel mine - steel is made from various raw materials (and now recycled metals). These materials may be mined separately and then combined at a steel mill - but steel is made, not mined. Steel, depending on what final characteristics they're trying to develop (strength, hardness, finish , etc.) can be comprised of iron, carbon, manganese, phosphorus, sulfur, nickel, chromium, etc. in varying quantities.
Q:types of stainless steel?
Types of stainless steel There are over 150 grades of stainless steel, of which fifteen are most common. The AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) defines the following grades among others: - 200 Series—austenitic iron-chromium-nickel-manganese alloys - 300 Series—austenitic iron-chromium-nickel alloys Type 301—highly ductile, for formed products. Also hardens rapidly during mechanical working. Type 303—free machining version of 304 via addition of sulfur Type 304—the most common; the classic 18/8 stainless steel Type 316—Alloy addition of molybdenum to prevent specific forms of corrosion - 400 Series—ferritic and martensitic alloys.

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