Galvanized Steel Coil SGCH CNBM

Ref Price:
Loading Port:
Payment Terms:
Min Order Qty:
20 m.t.
Supply Capability:
3000 m.t./month

OKorder Service Pledge

Quality Product

Order On-line Tracking

Timely Delivery

OKorder Service Pledge

Credit Rating

Credit Services

Credit Purchasing

Share to:

Product Description:

1.Quick Details:

  • Thickness: 0.15 - 2.0 mm

  • Technique: Hot Rolled

  • Application: Container Plate

  • Surface Treatment: Galvanized

  • Secondary Or Not: Non-secondary

  • Certification: CE

  • Special Pipe: Thick Wall Pipe

  • Alloy Or Not: Non-alloy

  • Section Shape: Other

2.Packaging & Delivery

Packaging Details:standard package
Delivery Detail:1-4 week
galvanized coil steel 
cold rolled galvanizing steel coil 
galvanized iron steel coil  
Grade symbolCMnPS
SGHC0.15 max.0.80 max.0.05 max.0.05 max.
5.What is the application of Steel Coil?

There are two sides,one is out side: Workshop, agricultural warehouse, residential precast unit, corrugated roof, roller shutter door, rainwater drainage pipe, retailer booth;the other is inside: Door, doorcase, light steel roof structure, folding screen, elevator, stairway, vent gutter.

Galvanized Steel Coil SGCH  CNBM

Send a message to us:

Remaining: 4000 characters

- Self introduction

- Required specifications

- Inquire about price/MOQ

Q:Steel Wool + 9V Battery Question...?
The reason the steel wool catches fire is because the strands of steel are so fine and they have a high resistance. The thin strands get to red-hot very quickly, compared to larger gauge copper wire which has lower resistance and can dissipate the heat over its larger mass. When you connect the battery to the wire first, then touch the steel wool, you are making solid contact with the steel wool and your hand makes sure that the wire stays in contact. The current continues to flow and the wool heats up. When you connect the wire to the steel wool first, as soon as you connect the battery the current melts that tiny bit of steel wool touching the wire and electrical contact is lost. The current stops flowing. No fire. If you want to connect the wire first and not have to hold it, you have to make sure that the current keeps flowing, perhaps by using a braided copper wire and spreading out the individual strands to make multiple contacts. Either that, or remove the insulation from a longer section of the wire and make sure that the entire un-insulated part of the wire is in contact with the steel wool. Maybe even weigh it down. Remember that any strands of steel wool touching that wire will melt as soon as the current starts, so you have to make sure that the wire will maintain contact somehow, the same way that your hand pushes the wire against it.
Q:is a 1962 steel penny worth anything?
I don't think they made steel pennies in 1962, did they?
Q:physics compression:Steel rod?
You need to calculate the stress on the rod and compare this with the mechanical properties of the steel. It would help if you were given more info. You will need to know something about the steel such as the yeild stress and E, the modulus of elasticity. The value of E is about the same for a wide range of steels. So long as the applied stress is below the yield stress, the strain is all elastic and is calculated from E. The real answer is that you can not answer this question since you do not know what the temperature is. Given the applied load, the change in length will be much different at room temperature than at 1500C.
steel that will not rust is called Stainless Steel. Exposure to oxygen causes rust. In stainless steel is heated and all the oxygen burnt out of it. I would go with a high grade (there are multiple grades) of stainless steel
Q:Probability of steel hardness?
Suppose that the hardness of steel is uniformly distributed, taking on values between 50 and 80 on the Rockwell B scale. That would be... f(x) = 1/(80 - 50), 50 ≤ x ≤ 80 . . . . . 0 elsewhere Consider this following problem.. Compute the probability that the hardness of a randomly selected steel specimen is less than 60. Here, we have... P(x 60) Oh! Know that the mean and the standard deviation of the uniform distribution function are... µ = (a + b)/2 σ = (a - b)²/12 You should get... µ = 65 σ = 75 Now... P(z (60 - 65)/75) = P(z -0.07) Hence, you should get around 0.462. Good luck!
Q:from where do steel plants in gary, pittsburgh, detroit and Birmingham get their raw materials?
I work for a pipe manufacturer in Birmingham, AL. We have multiple divisions including two specialized steel pipe divisions and a ductile iron pipe divisions. As far as the steel pipe divisions, they purchase skelp from suppliers. All of the steel that they purchase is of domestic manufacture, and is very expensive. As for the ductile iron division, we manufacture our own iron for the pipe. To get the iron that we need, we buy scrap in the form of cars, refrigerators, rejected pipe that we produce, etc. It is shredded in one part of the plant, and then melted and cast as a new product. This has become very problematic, scrap prices have skyrocketed in the US due to the large demand from countries such as China who gobble all of the material because they need great quantities of it. So, to answer your question, we get steel from recycling and then some raw iron ore. As to where we get the raw ore, I'm not 100% sure.
Q:Is stainless steel good for a butterfly knife?
This isn't really a question for this section, but I'm still happy to help out since I'm a big cutlery nerd as well. One thing to look out for when buying a knife is a lack of specifics on what steel is being used. High Carbon Stainless Steel doesn't tell you what the steel is, just what it MIGHT be. Chances are it's something along the lines of 420HC or 440A, both of which are softer steels. They aren't the worst steels around, but they are very quick to dull. You'd be better off looking at the Balisongs of Benchmade. They'll cost more, but you'll know that you're getting something made with quality materials and that won't break on you. And if it does break for some odd reason, Benchmade's warranty and customer service are both fantastic. Although if a more questionable knife is okay with you as long as the price isn't too high, then at least 420HC and 440A aren't too brittle and will take a decent edge even though they'll dull quickly. As for whether stainless steel is good for a knife or not, that depends on the type of stainless steel and what you're going to use the knife for. Many stainless steels are more brittle than a carbon steel, so high carbon stainless steels are a bit more likely to rust but a little tougher as well. In a butterfly knife, a steel like that is a good way to go, although the steels used by Benchmade, as I mentioned, are of a much better quality.
Q:Origin of the steel guitar in Country music?
As I don't know for sure I have a couple of really good guesses. I would say either Jerry Byrd of Ernest Tubb's Texas Troubadours or Don Helms of Hank Williams' Drifting Cowboys. I can tell you for sure that Bud Isaacs was the first player to use a pedal steel guitar on a hit recording: Slowly by Webb Pierce in 1953.
Q:What is extruded steel?
Extruded steel is only the steel being run through a die when it is heated, it usually reduces the size of the grain of the steel itself, enhancing toughness. Realistically though, in a handgun, it doesn't matter if the frame is cast or forged, both types will hold up to any amount of abuse, unless you use it as a sledgehammer, and are splitting stones with it, then the forged frame would win. 4140 is more than adequate for a slide/frame. Hell, even mild steel would be adequate as long as you don't mind some dings and scratches, and again, don't use it as a sledgehammer...
Q:If you combine stainless steel with gold, does that make stainless gold?
Stainless steel, I believe, was an actual trade name of a british cutlery company's knives, once the ability to create iron-chromium alloys was mastered. Stainless steel's main alloying agent that prevents it from rusting, is Chromium. The Chromium in the steel creates an protective layer (not unlike rust), which acts as a protectant for the rust-prone iron...keeping real rust away. I am no metallurgist, but I have not heard of gold being used as an alloying agent in common steels. I'm not even sure they would mix. Not all metals can be stirred together successfully. Even if gold could be used as an alloying agent for steel, it would need to be in such a small percentage, you would not end up with a metal that was gold in it would still look like steel of some sort. The funny part is, gold is already stainless, and does not tarnish or rust as it is.

1. Manufacturer Overview

Year Established
Annual Output Value
Main Markets
Company Certifications

2. Manufacturer Certificates

a) Certification Name  
Validity Period  

3. Manufacturer Capability

a)Trade Capacity  
Nearest Port
Export Percentage
No.of Employees in Trade Department
Language Spoken:
b)Factory Information  
Factory Size:
No. of Production Lines
Contract Manufacturing
Product Price Range