color coated steel coils

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Quick Details

  • Place of Origin:Shandong, China (Mainland)

  • Model Number:004

  • Material:Steel

  • zinc coating:40-180g/m2

Packaging & Delivery

Packaging Details:in sea worthy export packing
Delivery Detail:35days after getting l.c or t/t advance

Specifications

0.35mm color coated steel coils .materal : CGCC,DX51D
thickness:0.18-2.0mm
width:600mm-1250mm
capaclity : 5000mt per mont

prepainted steel coils  .materal : CGCC

thickness:0.18-2.0mm
width:600mm-1250mm
capaclity : 5000mt per month ,

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Q:What is the amount of Iron found in Steel?
pl. be specific about the type of steel: (Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon content between 0.02% and 1.7% by weight. Carbon is the most cost effective alloying material for iron, but many other alloying elements are also used.[1] Carbon and other elements act as a hardening agent, preventing dislocations in the iron atom crystal lattice from sliding past one another. Varying the amount of alloying elements and their distribution in the steel controls qualities such as the hardness, elasticity, ductility, and tensile strength of the resulting steel. Steel with increased carbon content can be made harder and stronger than iron, but is also more brittle. The maximum solubility of carbon in iron is 1.7% by weight, occurring at 1130° Celsius; higher concentrations of carbon or lower temperatures will produce cementite which will reduce the material's strength. Alloys with higher carbon content than this are known as cast iron because of their lower melting point.[1] Steel is also to be distinguished from wrought iron with little or no carbon, usually less than 0.035%. It is common today to talk about 'the iron and steel industry' as if it were a single thing; it is today, but historically they were separate products. Currently there are several classes of steels in which carbon is replaced with other alloying materials, and carbon, if present, is undesired. A more recent definition is that steels are iron-based alloys that can be plastically formed (pounded, rolled, etc.). Iron alloy phases : Austenite (γ-iron; hard) Bainite Martensite Cementite (iron carbide; Fe3C) Ferrite (α-iron; soft) Pearlite (88% ferrite, 12% cementite) Types of Steel : Plain-carbon steel (up to 2.1% carbon) Stainless steel (alloy with chromium) HSLA steel (high strength low alloy) Tool steel (very hard; heat-treated) Other Iron-based materials : Cast iron (2.1% carbon) Wrought iron (almost no carbon) Ductile iron)
Q:How much can the metal steel lift?
much too vague. Need the shape and thickness of the steel, where it is supported, and where the load is placed.
Q:Welding Stainless Steel?
Yes you can use regular welding rods for stainless steel. But you will not have the properties of the stainless. The weld joint will have a different color than the stainless if you grind/grain/finish the weld. It could also rust. The joint could be weaker. It is best to use a rod that comes as close to the base metal stainless as possible. (30 years welding - certified)
Q:how to tell if its stainless steel?
Stainless steel uses chromium in its mixture to thwart the affects of corrosion. General steel, or carbon steel, is generally almost completely iron and is used for far greater applications than stainless steel. Stainless steel is used mostly in kitchen appliances, utensils, etc... The best thing I can come up with is to find a way to measure the chromium content of the steel you are looking at. If it's around 3% chromium, it's probably standard steel. If it's somewhere between 10-15% chromium it's probably stainless steel (or even 4% plus). I can't tell you a fast and quick way to test the steel because from my research, it appears there are as many grades and allows of steel as there are uses for steel! There is one test I've seen for home testing surgical steel which is a higher grade stainless steel, that is to put scotch tape on one section of material then soak it in water for a 24 hour period, then let it air dry for 24 hours. You remove the tape and lightly polish the exposed areas to see if there was any discoloration or pitting on the exposed area. This test is mainly for surgical steel jewelry, however stainless steel is supposed to resist rusting more than standard steel, hence it might work for other steel types as well. You may have to read some of the other links below to get some other ideas on how you can test steel to see if it is stainless.
Q:Coating on Steel Wool?
spun steel fibers have a microscopic coating of oil to prevent them from rusting. Rusting steel wool wouldn't sell very well. I would think that removing this oil could be accomplished with any good degreaser, like brake cleaner or the like. However, I've never tried this before. In science class they perform experiments by removing the oil with vinegar. After wringing out the steel wool pad, it is wrapped around a thermometer and placed in a sealed jar. After a few minutes the temperature rises because of the chemical reaction that takes place when four atoms of iron react with three atoms of oxygen and create two atoms of iron oxide - RUST! You can unwittingly recreate this experiment by using steel wool in the process of removing one or more layers of finish from a piece of furniture Hope this helps
Q:Stretching Ears: Acrylic vs Steel?
Steel is much better because acrylic can't be sterilized. If you have the option, titanium is much better because steel can cause nickle allergies, which can get pretty irritating.
Q:I am getting a benchmade mpr (m390 steel) and am unsure if it is a good knife look at the chart below?
From what I understand m390 is a new steel (at least for benchmade) so there doesn't seem to be a consensus on how it performs. Looking at the table, it should be very corrosion resistant. I'd guess it could be classified as a stainless steel. Sorry I don't have more info for you. EDIT: here's a link from the steel manufacturer. I hope this info helps.
Q:How to sharpen a knife with the stone and the steel?
The site listed above gives you a great step by step procedure on how to do this yourself. A Sharpening Steel is used to sharpen the fine edge of a knife. Many knives only need this done to have a refined edge. Any fine edge of a knife can have minor burrs that occur with normal use. To sharpen this type of edge, merely run the knife at an approximate 7-8 degree angle, away from yourself on the Sharpening steel repeatedly (no more than about 8-10 times each side, alternating each side as you go). Give the knife a quick wash, to remove any unwanted detritus, and you are ready to go. If you want to resharpen an entire knife, use a wet stone. Remember some stones have a natural oil in it, some do not. If you are already using a stone with oil, continue to use it with Mineral Oil as the lubricant. If it is a dry stone, use warm water. You'll never be able to change a stone once you use oil. Make sure its as flat as you can. Wet it with warm water, or the mineral oil, rub the knife away from yourself (on the coarse side) at a 5 degree angle on both sides. Alternating sides approximately 20-30 times each. Flip the stone over (dry finer side), and at a 6 degree angle, rub the knife blade toward you on both sides approximately 10 times on each side. Using either your Sharpening steel, or 550-600 coarse emory paper, rub the knife away from you 5-7 alternating times on each side at about a 7-8 degree angle. Clean the knife well. You now have a VERY sharp knife that will require this entire treatment ony 2-4 times a year at most. Otherwise, keep using the sharpening steel. I GUARANTEE this works best.
Q:Steel Barns..........?
sure , steel barns are all over the place...the common brand of steel buildings around here are Butler Buildings...
Q:Can you put nylon strings on a guitar that came with steel strings?
Guitars okorder.com/

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