Hot Dipped Galvanized Steel in Coil

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Hot Dip Galvanized Steel Coil
Steel Grade & Standard:JIS G3302 SGHC
Zinc Coating Mass:Z14
Spangle:Regular Spangle
Surface Treatment:CHROMATED & UNOILED
Thickness:3.7mm
Width:610mm
Coil ID:610mm
Coil Weight:4MTS MIN

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Q:What are the characteristics of hot-rolled steel coils and cold rolled steel coils? What loading and unloading tools should be used? What items should be paid attention to?
General handling steel rolls are used for driving. Forklift trucks are OK, but a larger fork truck, usually cold rolled, weighs less than 15T. The hot rolled coil is below 30T.
Q:Buoyancy question. Why does a steel nail sinks but a steel ship floats.?
surface area of the ship against the water is much greater than the nail.
Q:Heat treatment of mild steel? Process description macro-micro
Mild steel is a solution of carbon within iron, etc. When the steel is very hot the carbon is well distributed. As the steel is cooled iron crystals form excluding the carbon that will then collect at the boundaries (grain boundaries) between iron crystals. If cooling is rapid at any point in the cool down crystal growth will cease (affecting final grain size and the mix of carbon and iron at the grain boundaries). The ductility or hardness of the resulting steel will be determined by the grain sizes and makeup of the carbon/iron mix between grains. Ductile iron permits 'slabs' of iron to slip past each other within iron crystals and location of carbon atoms may help prevent slip resulting in hardness. Therefore, heat treatment usually consists of 'soaking' the steel at a temperature high enough to dissolve all the carbon uniformly then cooling it down slowly or rapidly to obtain optimum grain size and interstitial carbon between grains to obtain desired properties.
Q:knowledge of steel composition?
You have opened a can of worms. Specific types of steel vary not only by composition but by the way they were made, their physical properties and their morphology (microscopic structure). The composition you have given would fit for High Carbon Steel and Medium Carbon Steel. Go to the reference I've given, it allows you to put in 3 of the components of your alloy and then it gives you a list of possibilities. You can open each candidate individually and see the full composition. Hours of fun. :)
Q:silver soldering stainless steel?
the flux you need is powdered borax
Q:How to temper steel? ?
Heat treating easy, HA! It is the most critical part of bladesmithing. Done wrong and all those hours of work go up in smoke (or a snap of the steel). You'll need a bucket of oil, preferably one that is deep enough to go in point first. If not you'll have to go in edge first, not recommended on a double edged blade, ok for single edge. You'll need to build a charcoal fire long enough for the blade. You will need to blow air under the fire to get it hot enough, the challenge is getting the heat even. You get the fire going and established, put the blade in turning it back and forth (if you keep turning it in the same direction when it heats up you could work a twist in it). When it starts turning red pull it out and touch it with a magnet, if the magnet sticks put it back. Keep heating and repeating until the magnet no longer sticks. Heat a little more, then quench rapidly point first. Don't let the blade lean to one side as warpage will occur. When it cools enough to touch, check with a file. If the doesn't file cut then you've properly hardened the steel and it's ready for temper. Now comes the really hard part. Grind the scale off carefully,preferably with a side grinder with a flap wheel. I've had hard wheel break freshly hardened blades. After cleaning you'll need to put it in an oven (preferred) or use a torch and carefully heat the blade. Watch the temper colors (oven temp 500-550F) or with the torch as the steel turns colors blue to purple for a double edged weapon. Any warpage that occurs needs to be worked out at temping temp.
Q:STEEL STRINGS ON CLASSICAL GUITAR?
I will also strongly agree with Joshua, and Birdgirl. Besides after the cost of such reinforcements, would cost as much, or more than the cost of buying a new one. Besides if the guitar is a decent quality, the alterations made would destroy any value it has, as well as not guaranteeing that the guitar will even be fully functional, or hold together over a period of time. It could easily cost two hundred dollars to have done, and at that price, you could buy a decent one, that is made for steel strings. Also fo4rget mounting steel strings on the one you have, unless you want to destroy it.
Q:Why is stainless steel rust proof?
Rust Proof Metal
Q:i know stainless steel don't rust, does that go the same for just regular steel..?
Dear, Thank you, am also fine like you then dear yeah is the same.
Q:Why should you heat thicker steel before welding?
:you could attempt welding with whats pronounced as a filler rod. you could weld with the a million/8 rod interior the welder stinger and by conserving the a million/sixteen rod in the different hand, upload it as you weld.

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