Hot-dip Zinc Coating Steel Building Roof Walls --Good Visual Effect

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50 m.t.
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10000 m.t./month

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Hot-dip Zinc Coating Steel Building Roof Walls --Good Visual Effect

1.Structure Description

Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications. Production of cold formed corrugated sheets and profiles for roofing, cladding, decking, tiles, sandwich walls, rainwater protective systems, air conditioning duct .

 

2.Main Features 

• Excellent process capability

• Smooth and flat surface

• Workability, durability 

• Excellent anticorrosive property

• High strength

3.Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Images

Hot-dip Zinc Coating Steel Building Roof Walls --Good Visual Effect

Hot-dip Zinc Coating Steel Building Roof Walls --Good Visual Effect

 

 

 

4.Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Specification

Standard: ASTM, JIS,EN

Grade: CS, DX51D+Z,SGCC, SS 230~550,S220GD+Z~S550GD+Z, SGC340~SGC570

Thickness: 0.18mm~5mm

Width: max 2000mm

Coil weight:3-12 MT

Coil ID:508/610mm

  

5.FAQ:

We have organized several common questions for our clients,may help you sincerely: 

1.How to guarantee the quality of the products?

We have established the international advanced quality management system,every link from raw material to final product we have strict quality test;We resolutely put an end to unqualified products flowing into the market. 2. How long can we receive the product after purchase?

Usually within thirty working days after receiving buyer’s advance payment or LC. We will arrange the factory manufacturing as soon as possible. The cargo readiness usually takes 15-30 days, but the shipment will depend on the vessel situation.

 

 

 

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Q:Sandpaper versus Steel wool?
Steel wool and wax is for the final buff after the finish coat. Sanding will scratch the finish and should only be done before the finish coat. Steel wool and wax have been used as the final finish to remove rough areas and buff the finish for a long time.
Q:Ways to damage steel?
There are plenty of ways to damage/weaken steel... shear or tensile force, fatigue, temperature, corrosion, grinding, etc... there are even dozens of ways to do each of the things I just listed. But in the case you suggested, with the steel being very close to skin... a simple pair of bolt cutters would probably be the easiest.
Q:What type of welding rod to use welding cast steel?
Normal okorder.com/.. Mild steel and cast steel produces a very long stream of brilliant sparks, with some forking. CI produces much shorter, dull reddish sparks and the volume of sparks is much less. many highly branched or intermittent sparks will be seen.
Q:Wolf ammo/steel case ammo question?
I okorder.com/
Q:damascus steel knife making?
Here's what you need, the cable should be a minimum of 9/16 with large wires. You need some borax (20 mule team from the store). A good hot coal, coke, or gas forge. If the cable has fiber rope in the center it will need to be removed. Fuse the ends of the cable to keep them from coming apart. I use my welder and while I'm at it I weld a handle to make it easier. Heat it in the forge when the forge is properly heated, rotate it. Some people will burn the oil out, but I've found that the forge does that just fine. Rotate the cable while it's heating. When it begins the turn red pull it out and sprinkle the borax over it, don't hold back use a lot. It will begin to melt and bubble into the steel. Put the cable back in the forge, rotate and watch. This is the critical part. When the steel starts to turn from orange/yellow to almost yellow/white take it out and lightly (I use a 2lb hammer) begin hammering the cable into a square or rectangle. If you do it right you'll notice that it will begin to fight the hammer, that's when you know the weld it taking place. You'll have to repeat the process down the length of the cable. Once you have the billet made you can begin the process of shaping the edge and tang. Once you have it shaped, follow proper forge procedure then grind all the yuck off and finish shaping. Then harden and temper and finish it out. Good luck. I almost forgot a very important part. Befor you start hammering put the cable in a vice while at welding temp (if you are strong you can use a couple of plyers) and twist it tight. On the next heat hold the cable in your left and and lay it on the anvil. Concentrate on your light hammer blows being on your side of the cable. This forces the cable strands together. If you are using smaller cable like 9/16 you can double the cable up and weld two peices together, it is easier and makes for a prettier blade. Doing this you don't have to worry about twisting the cable and you can hit it much harder to start with.
Q:Is stainless steel good for a butterfly knife?
This isn't really a question for this section, but I'm still happy to help out since I'm a big cutlery nerd as well. One thing to look out for when buying a knife is a lack of specifics on what steel is being used. High Carbon Stainless Steel doesn't tell you what the steel is, just what it MIGHT be. Chances are it's something along the lines of 420HC or 440A, both of which are softer steels. They aren't the worst steels around, but they are very quick to dull. You'd be better off looking at the Balisongs of Benchmade. They'll cost more, but you'll know that you're getting something made with quality materials and that won't break on you. And if it does break for some odd reason, Benchmade's warranty and customer service are both fantastic. Although if a more questionable knife is okay with you as long as the price isn't too high, then at least 420HC and 440A aren't too brittle and will take a decent edge even though they'll dull quickly. As for whether stainless steel is good for a knife or not, that depends on the type of stainless steel and what you're going to use the knife for. Many stainless steels are more brittle than a carbon steel, so high carbon stainless steels are a bit more likely to rust but a little tougher as well. In a butterfly knife, a steel like that is a good way to go, although the steels used by Benchmade, as I mentioned, are of a much better quality.
Q:Steel used to be made in the \Bessemer Converter...?
Steel making today is a faster process as use Blast furnace which Coke Limestone Iron ore are fed into the top of the furnace. after these are fed in a exothermic happens and converts these ores into Iron. Iron is not strong enough to be used in thing this is formally known as pig iron. To convert Iron ore into steel it has to go to a process called the BOS Basic Oxygen Steel-making were oxygen is blown onto the iron ore for about 30 to 45 min and this then turns it into steel as all the impurities are taken out and this floats on top and known as slag and used for things such as road building. Once you have steel this is then pored into ladles and taken to the continuous caster and rolled into slabs, billets and bars and then cut off and rolled into a finished products and then taken to compniaes to be made into thins you see made out off metal such as skyscrapers. Hope this helps :o)
Q:Can you weld galvanized steel?
Welding Galvanized Pipe
Q:Is 1045 steel pretty good for a knife blade?
1045 Steel
Q:what is a better grade of steel?
SAE 440 is the best. Classified as high grade cutlery steel. There are various grades of 440: A, B, C, and F. 440 A is the most stain resistant while 440 C has the most carbon and can achieve the highest hardness (Best edge Retention). SAE 440 Chemistry: 16 - 18% Chromium, 0.60 - 1.2% Carbon, 0.75% Molybdenum. SAE 420 is pretty good. Classified as cutlery steel, it is a stain resistant grade but has less chromium and significantly less carbon than SAE 440. SAE 420 Chemistry: 12 - 14% Chromium, 0.15% Carbon (min), 0 Molybdenum Chromium is what makes the steel corrosion resistant. It also adds toughness. Molybdenum adds extra corrosion resistance and adds hardenability. So you can see by chemical components that 440 is highest quality although that also means more cost. 1045 and 1065 are low quality steels and you should probably never use them for a knife. The 1 indicates plain carbon steel with little other alloying elements. The last two digits indicate how much carbon is in the steel. 1045 has 0.45% carbon, mid-range hardenability. 1065 has 0.65% carbon, high hardenability. So if I had to choose I would choose 1065 over 1045 but the difference isn't that noticeable. Everything I said here assumes they have all had the optimum Quench and Temper heat-treatment for their chemistry grade.

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