prepainted Galvanized Rolled Steel Coil -CGLCC

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Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
100 m.t.
Supply Capability:
500000 m.t./month

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Product Description:

Description:

Prepainted Galvanized Steel usually refers to have substrateprocessed with surface processed and coated then(roller coated )or bonded  organic thin film and baked, and it is able to be processed tofinal prodevtion .

PrepaintedGalvanized Steel qualified with excellent decorative ,formability ,corrosionresistance ,coating adhesion ,can keep for a long time as well as maintainfresh color .For color coated steel sheet  can obtain good economicbenefit by steel belt wood ,efficient in construction and save energy ,preventpollution etc.Which is an ideal material;for manufacturing board.


Technical Data:

Yield Strength

(Mpa) 280-320

Tensile Strength

(Mpa) 340-390

Elongation

20%-30%

Reverse Impact

9J

T-bending

≥2T

Pencil Hardness

≥2H

Duration Of Salt Spray Test

500 H

Bending At 180 Degree

No crack, purling and fraction

Applications:

It can be widely used in transportation, light industry, civil usage and farming. It is also the perfect building material in construction for making steel roofing,insulation panel, corrugate sheet, facade wall,shutters,T-bar and home appliance.

 

Packaging & Delivery:

The packing of coils consists of anti-damp paper, PVC film, hardboard paper, steel box, strapped with steel strips, fitted with locks and edge protectors and guarantees the optimal condition of the delivered goods. Each coil can be additionally fitted with wooden/steel skids(eye to the side) or wooden pallets(eye to the sky).

 

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prepainted Galvanized Rolled Steel Coil -CGLCC

prepainted Galvanized Rolled Steel Coil -CGLCC



 

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Q:Physics! Steel pots and pans?
Yep I agree with Scamper. Copper pot would be toxic so lined with tin or stainless steel.
Q:Are scandium revolvers as durable as steel?
You know, I've kind of wondered about that too. Admittedly Scandium is a rather durable material, no contest there... but from the perspective of a machinist who has played with said Scandium in the past... it seems to *flake* on the blanchard grinders... hell, even fly cutting it acts kinda weird. I like steel because it's predictable, it has a fatigue point that is predictable... and when that fatigue point is met (limits of elastic modulus met by repetitive stress/strain exertions) it's fairly obvious. You get cracking, warping, and sometimes stretch marks... (yes, you can get *stretch marks* on steel). Scandium... I don't know. I don't know if it'll start cracking when it finally fatigues... or if it'll just let go all at once. Anyways, I don't think I'd worry too much about your revolver. It'll hold up I'm very sure (they've been around for years and people have put many, many rounds through them). Call me odd, but I'm a fan of steel. It's conventional, inexpensive (relatively speaking), and utterly durable.
Q:CONNECTING STAINLESS STEEL TUBE (SOLDER?)?
Soft Soldering All grades of stainless steel can be soldered with lead-tin soft solder. Leaded solders should not be used when the product being soldered is used for food processing, serving or transport. Soldered joints are relatively weak compared to the strength of the steel, so this method should not be used where the mechanical strength is dependent upon the soldered joint. Strength can be added if the edges are first lock-seamed, spot welded or riveted. In general, welding is always preferable to soldering. Recommended procedure for soldering: · 1. The steel surfaces must be clean and free of oxidation. · 2. A rough surface improves adherence of the solder, so roughening with grinding wheel, file or coarse abrasive paper is recommended. · 3. Use a phosphoric acid based flux. Hydrochloric acid based fluxes require neutralising after soldering as any remnant traces will be highly corrosive to the steel. Hydrochloric acid based fluxes are not recommended for soldering of stainless steels. · 4. Flux should be applied with a brush, to only the area being soldered. · 5. A large, hot iron is recommended. Use the same temperature as for carbon steel, but a longer time will be required because of stainless steel's low thermal conductivity. · 6. Any type of solder can be used, but at least 50% tin is recommended. Solder with 60-70% tin and 30-40% lead has a better colour match and greater strength.
Q:Nylon or Steel strings for guitar?
If your acoustic guitar is a steel-string (acoustic only means it's not electric) you can only put steel strings on it. Nylon strings would probably require modification of the nut and would sound terrible even then. A steel-string guitar is built and braced to work with steel strings and will not respond properly to the lighter tension of nylon strings. On the other hand, steel strings will destroy a guitar that is built for nylon in very short order. There are two things you can do here. If you have a steel-string guitar and are still using the strings that came on it, they are probably light gauge. You could try an extra-light set or even silk steel. Alternatively, you could have your guitar looked at by a guitar tech or other knowledgeable person and see if it needs a setup. The action (string height off the fretboard) on a properly adjusted steel-string guitar should actually be lower than on a classical guitar. Cheap guitars off the internet or from non-music stores are especially notorious for being poorly adjusted.
Q:Quality of a 440A steel blade?
440 steel is fine for most knives, but there are better quality steels out there for specialized uses. If you like the knife you have, don't worry about what other people say. If you like the new knife more, trade for it. Sometimes I question why people have to ask so many questions about what's better than what.
Q:Can you leave steel paintless?
There is another thing you can do to inhibit corrosion on bare metal surfaces. Use a good quality automotive wax. Apply it with diligence, and keep the bike in the garage when you're not using it so it stays dry. Touch up the wax job every now and then to maintain the protective finnish.
Q:Is mild steel environmentally friendly?
Steel just rusts, it doesn't produce any emissions just sitting there. They even make architectural steel called Corten to rust to a nice patina. If you consider how the steel was made in the first place, a great big NO! Steel making requires massive amounts of electricity plus it gives off some nasty fumes in the liquid state. Leather itself doesn't emit much of anything, but the dyes might. Again though, if you look at how it's made, tanning leather is right up there with steel mills and paper mills for pollution, some of the worst.
Q:Reloading and shooting steel.?
It would actually cost you more to reload steel.
Q:white gold engagement ring with stainless steel wedding band?
Stainless steel is not going to look like white gold. I have some stainless steel pieces from Tiffany (not rings, just earrings and necklaces) and I think they look like.. well, stainless steel. They need to be polished often, and they scratch easily. Thats one thing when youre talking about earrings that just dangle from your ears, but honestly for a ring you are wearing on your hand... I would not go the stainless steel route. I would invest in a better metal that is going to stand the test of time.
Q:How to temper steel? ?
Heat treating easy, HA! It is the most critical part of bladesmithing. Done wrong and all those hours of work go up in smoke (or a snap of the steel). You'll need a bucket of oil, preferably one that is deep enough to go in point first. If not you'll have to go in edge first, not recommended on a double edged blade, ok for single edge. You'll need to build a charcoal fire long enough for the blade. You will need to blow air under the fire to get it hot enough, the challenge is getting the heat even. You get the fire going and established, put the blade in turning it back and forth (if you keep turning it in the same direction when it heats up you could work a twist in it). When it starts turning red pull it out and touch it with a magnet, if the magnet sticks put it back. Keep heating and repeating until the magnet no longer sticks. Heat a little more, then quench rapidly point first. Don't let the blade lean to one side as warpage will occur. When it cools enough to touch, check with a file. If the doesn't file cut then you've properly hardened the steel and it's ready for temper. Now comes the really hard part. Grind the scale off carefully,preferably with a side grinder with a flap wheel. I've had hard wheel break freshly hardened blades. After cleaning you'll need to put it in an oven (preferred) or use a torch and carefully heat the blade. Watch the temper colors (oven temp 500-550F) or with the torch as the steel turns colors blue to purple for a double edged weapon. Any warpage that occurs needs to be worked out at temping temp.

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