good hot-dip galvanized/ aluzinc steel in CNBM

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Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
30 m.t.
Supply Capability:
5000000 m.t./month

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Product Description:

Description:

 

Standard:

AISI,ASTM,BS,DIN,GB,JIS

Grade:

SGCC,DX51D/DX52D/S250,280GD

Thickness:

0.12-4.0 mm

Place  of Origin:

China  (Mainland)

Brand  Name:

N/M

Model  Number:

ssp-226

Type:

Steel  Coil

Technique:

Cold  Rolled

Surface  Treatment:

galvanized/  Galvalume/zinc coatting

Application:

strong  anti-corrosion ability,cold bending molded manufacturablity

Special  Use:

High-strength  Steel Plate

Width:

600-1250 mm

Length:

in  coil

product:

g40  prime/secordary hot-dip galvanized cold rolled steel coil/sheet

 

 

Packaging  & Delivery

 

 

 

 

 

Packaging  Detail:

standard  export package,Other types of packing can be customized as per client's  requirement.

Delivery  Detail:

as  per client's requirements

Service:

1,on time delivery
2,high quality with competitive price
3,good service
4,long-term cooperation
5, rely on honors

 

We can ensure that stable quality standards are maintained, strictly meeting both market requirements and customers’ expectations. Our products enjoy an excellent reputation and have been exported to Europe, South-America, the Middle-East, Southeast-Asia, Africa and Russia etc.. We sincerely hope to establish good and long-term business relationship with your esteemed company.

 

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Q:Is Steel crystalline in its makeup?
Steel is made of billions, trillions of very small crystals. This is true of most metals. In order to see the crystal structure of steel, you usually need to cut a sample of it, grind and polish the cut face smooth, then etch the steel with a mixture of nitric acid and alcohol. Without polishing and etching the crystals aren't visible- it just looks like smooth solid metal. Also, in most cases the crystals are small enough that you need a microscope to see them clearly after etching.
Q:Why low carbon steel have poor magnetic properties?
The composition of the steel is almost tertiary to many other considerations, except that there are certain elements and percentages of elements which tend to affect the crystaline structure in the steel. The most basic question is whether the crystaline arrangement of atoms in the steel is martensitic or austenitic, and many factors influence that. In general, martensitic structure is magnetic and austenitic structure doesn't respond much to magnetic fields, but there are varying degrees of martensitic and austenitic -- there is never a pure state. Read the articles at bottom.
Q:Where to buy silicon steel?
Electrical Steel Suppliers
Q:Best steel for a all purpose knife?
There is no right one answer, because the term all purpose knife covers a very broad spectrum. The same knife that would be good for wood carving will not be the same for food prep, and will not be the same for general utility purposes. I'll just give you my humble opinion. For fixed blade, hard use blades. Where you will be doing bush tasks like chopping, carving etc... 1095 carbon is generally the standard. Now, 1095 is a great steel, it isn't the BEST steel. There are other steels that can outperform it. But for the price and availability its hard to beat. For folders, I prefer a decent stainless, like aus 8. It holds a good edge, and will hold up to any tasks you need a folding knife to do. Contrary to what you will read on the internet, stainless steel is not all crap. Its just that cheap stainless is just that, cheap. Stainless steel is only as good as its tempering process, some companies such as boker do amazing things with the steel and make for an impressive blade. Just stay away from crap stainless. So to sum up. 1095 for fixed blades. aus 8 for folders. These are both common steels used by different companies. If you get caught up on finding the perfect steel, you may overlook more important aspects of the knife itself. Unless your fixed blade is mostly going to be a food processing, and skinning knife, then I would suggest a QUALITY stainless as well. Remember that all high carbon blades need to be kept oiled or they will start to rust very fast. Btw, I suggest anyone looking into knives to check out mora fixed blades. Incredibly cheap, sharp and durable. They are the rockstars of bushcraft.
Q:Can a bear bend steel?
depends how thick the steel is. Looking at it, I would say yes. Not the frame pieces, but just the walls of the pool.
Q:Carbon Steel or Stainless Steel? ?
Carbon steel will corrode much more easily than stainless steel, and stainless can be made stronger than carbon steel. Stainless steel is also usually heavier than carbon steel, which helps to control recoil when the gun is fired (recoil is not eliminated, only reduced). Stainless steel can also be polished to a mirror finish, so it doesn't have to be chrome-plated for that shine. Probably the biggest plus to using stainless over carbon steel, though, is the fact that it is far less prone to crystalization than carbon steel. When steel crystalizes, it becomes brittle, and can break at the worst possible times. Bad thing about stainless: It generally costs more. Aluminum is much lighter than any steel, size-for-size, and can be just as strong, if not stronger, than steel; I've worked with aluminum alloys that require special-made tooling. The difference, besides the weight issue, is that aluminum (even most alloys) will become softer when it is heated to a specific point -- which is why it is not used for the barrels of firearms using explosive powders as the propellent source. Because of the cost of the alloys which can withstand the heat generated in the barrel of a firearm, it is just less expensive to use a steel barrel. And for a fella that is so pro-gun, the previous answerer sure seems ignorant of 'em.
Q:Urine dulls too shiny stainless steel?
Stainless steel will rust under proper conditions. I live on a boat on salt water, trust me. If the urine works it won't be prone to rusting any more than before. It's not the shine that inhibits rusting with stainless steel, it the % of carbon in the steel, compared to regular steel. IF the urine works it's because it is acidic (a mild acid). Wash it with a small brush and some baking soda to neutralize the acid when your done. A much stronger acid would be swimming pool acid. (Muriatic acid) but be careful you might test a spot with a Q tip on the back. If you try Muriatic acid it would take seconds.Then wash in baking soda water to remove all acid.. SS
Q:What material is strongest? Human bone, steel, or concrete?
Steel is used to shape and reinforce concrete. Steel is also used in cutting bones in surgery and repairing bone through use of steel pins and braces. So, the answer is most definitely steel. In answer to your watch question, the volume of concrete was greater than that of your watch. The question of large volume vs. small volume is an easy one. Ten tons of human bone would easily reduce a 1 lb block of concrete to powder. Likewise, ten tons of concrete would snap a steel bar like a toothpick. Your watch had much less volume than the concrete you dropped it on. Furthermore, with enough force, your watch would have made a hole in the concrete, but its acceleration was not enough to counter the impacting force of the solid concrete reinforced by the soil and clay below it.
Q:Ideas for Fantasy Culture: Steel Making?
Well, steel is just modified iron, so you're going to have to start with acquiring the iron first. For that, you're most likely going to be using some sort of underground mining somewhere - either they do that themselves, or they purchase the iron elsewhere. Assuming you're not dealing with meteoric iron (which is possible, but pretty uncommon), or iron sands (not likely in a woodland area), then unless you're dealing with a rocky outcropping with iron veins out in the open, I'm pretty sure there needs to be somebody doing some digging. That said, it doesn't need to be a full raping of the land scenario. A couple of minor mines, some small-scale smelting operations, and somebody knowing the secret of making steel, and it could give you small amounts of steel without making an ecological disaster.
Q:Steel reinforced armor.?
I don't think that would work. First off, there's not enough carbon in steel - even very high carbon steels are only about 2% carbon. Second, the iron atoms in steel form a crystal lattice, in the shape of a cube, with another iron atom in the middle of the cube. Each cube is about 0.3 nm per side. Carbon atoms work their way into the crystals and displace the iron atoms. But a carbon nanotube is around 1 nanometer in diameter - that's 3 times as big as the iron lattice! So a nanotube wouldn't fit. One thing you might do, however, is make a composite - mix the materials together on a scale a little bigger than the atomic scale that the iron and carbon mix to make steel. Just like a carbon fiber bicycle frame or ski pole is strands of carbon (much bigger and not as strong as nanotubes) held together with epoxy, you could hold nanotube strands together with metal. Not sure it would be good for armor, but if you can figure out a way to do it, I'm sure someone will come up with a use for it!

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