Prepainted Galvanized Rolled Steel Coil -SGCC

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Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
30 m.t.
Supply Capability:
500000 m.t./month

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Product Description:

Description of Prepainted Galvanized Steel:

Prepainted Galvanized Steel usually refers to have substrateprocessed with surface processed and coated then(roller coated )or bonded  organic thin film and baked, and it is able to be processed tofinal prodevtion .

PrepaintedGalvanized Steel qualified with excellent decorative ,formability ,corrosionresistance ,coating adhesion ,can keep for a long time as well as maintainfresh color .For color coated steel sheet  can obtain good economicbenefit by steel belt wood ,efficient in construction and save energy ,preventpollution etc.Which is an ideal material;for manufacturing board.


Specifications Of Prepainted Galvanized Steel:

Thickness                 0.20-1.2mm (BMT)

Width                          600-1250mm

                                         Zinc Coating            100-275g/m2

                                         Color                          According to RAL color fan or as per request

                                         Internal Diameter      508mm or 610mm

                                         Coil Weight               3-6MT

                                         Quality                      Commercial and structural quality

                                          Paint                         Polyester paint for topside, epoxy for reverse

                                         Standard                  JIS G 3312, ASTM A755M, EN 10169

                                         Base Steel Grade   SGCC,SGCD,DX51D+Z,DX52D+Z;S200GD,S220GD,S280GD,S350GD,CS,FS,SS   


Applications OfPrepainted Galvanized Steel:

It can be widely used in transportation, light industry, civil usage and farming. It is also the perfect building material in construction for making steel roofing,insulation panel, corrugate sheet, facade wall,shutters,T-bar and home appliance.

 

Packaging & Delivery Of Prepainted Galvanized Steel:

The packing of coils consists of anti-damp paper, PVC film, hardboard paper, steel box, strapped with steel strips, fitted with locks and edge protectors and guarantees the optimal condition of the delivered goods. Each coil can be additionally fitted with wooden/steel skids(eye to the side) or wooden pallets(eye to the sky).

 


 

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Q:steel or graphite?
If its for your bf, i would buy steel. Most guys prefer steel because it is more accurate and it think every guy on the pga tour uses steel shafted irons. Steel also usually costs less, which helps. Neither one is better, its just a matter of personal preference.
Q:where is cold formed steel framing used?
It will vary from location to location. A possible way of telling is how the material is joined. If the material is riveted together it is likely cold rolled. If the material is welded then its probably normalized steel (possibly annealed but less likely). Cold rolling increases the yield strength of the material so less of it is needed. However, it also make the material more brittle. Welding creates defects in the region surrounding the weld and these are more likely to grow and cause failure in a cold rolled steel than a normalised or annealed steels. In addition the heat from the welding will change the microstructure that was deliberately introduced by the cold rolling process resulting in a localised drop in yield strength. Normalised and annealed steels are more ductile and tougher than Cold rolled steel but they have a lower yield strength. Because they are tough and ductile they are less sensitive to crakcs and defects so welding won't lead to as big a reduction in strength. Another possible consideration is the environment they are used in. Steels exhibit a transition temperature (actually more like a range) where they go from behaving like a ductile material to a brittle material. A well known example of what this can cause are the Liberty ships in WW2 (Supply vessels from the US to the UK). These were made by welding together sheets of cold rolled steel to form one continuous Hull. Unfortuantely the transiton temperature of the steel taht was sued was around 4 degrees while the Baltic Ocean is about 0 degrees. As a result small cracks would grow and then when the reached a critical size they would tear through the ship at the speed of sound in the metal (1500m/s) and these massive cargo ships would literally snap like twigs. So, if the steel is being used somewhere really cold its unlikely to be Cold rolled too.
Q:What oil to use on knife steel?
If the knife is stainless steel, then you don't have to worry about it rusting, unless you leave it sheathed in a wet sheath. Be sure you clean it off before folding it up or re- sheathing it. For carbon steel blades, almost any good household oil will work. 3 in 1, Rem oil, etc.
Q:Are desalination plants made of steel?
yes stainless steel pipes
Q:Science Question About Steel?
just like a melting point of ice and the boiling point of water, there are different points where something is converted into another form. such as icewatersteam. it's always the same thing and it's a physical change, but just in a different form. molten steel changes to solid steel at it's freezing point. or solid point. i'm not sure how you would word that. but it would not be melting or boiling point. hope that helped.
Q:Can you WELD STEEL to ALUMINUM? How much heavier/stronger is STEEL?
Note: the easiest way to join steel to aluminum is to drill holes and BOLT them together...... You cannot WELD steel to aluminum.(except using extreme methods like explosion welding......) For all intents and purposes they are dissimilar metals, meaning they will not bond to each other. Also, aluminum has a much lower melting point than steel. It is possible to join steel and aluminum by *Soldering,* using tin/zinc hard solder. This requires a special flux designed exclusively for soldering aluminum though. The heating process is also a bit delicate as you must avoid overheating the joint. I work as a welder and I've only soldered Al three or four times. Steel is easiest to weld by far. If you set the equipment correctly, a six year-old kid can make a good weld on steel. Aluminum requires special equipment and procedures to weld. It's not easy. The brittleness of aluminum depends on it's alloy content. Most of the aluminum that's used today is not pure, rather it's in the form of aluminum ALLOYS which contain either zinc, magnesium, silicon, or manganese. these elements increase the strength dramatically, but also make it much less ductile. Commercially pure (CP) aluminum is very ductile, but it's also rather weak. Pure aluminum is used to make aluminum foil, as it's so soft and ductile it can easily be rolled paper-thin. The best aluminum alloys can come near in strength to mild steel, but weigh less than half as much as steel. Note that steel itself is an alloy of iron and carbon, Carbon increases the strength of iron in the same way that zinc or magnesium increase aluminum's strength. Most of the commonly used aluminum alloys are somewhat more brittle than mild steel, but not greatly so.
Q:What is so special about Japanese steel?
After WWII, The United States in order to help the Japanese get back on their feet, sent over the equipment needed to make the newest types of foundries available at the time. While this was a big boon for the Japanese, this meant that most of our foundries were using the older technologies. Japanese Steel then had a bit of a edge on purity than ours did and when you have a purer steel, you have a better product. Since then, they've stayed at the top of the game when it comes to steel. Not only because of the equipment which we have caught up with them on and stay with them on, but because they also have a stronger tradition regarding steel. They have made quality steel blades that were decades ahead of what the West could produce. So you couple that quality of metallurgy with modern techniques we gave them, they took steel making and and ran with it to be one of the top steel producers in the world. Don't get me wrong. We in the US can make Steel as well as they can. But we have ranges of steel. You can get a steel tool that is as good as a Japanese offering (if not more so) but at the same time you can also get a steel tool that is well...Dollar Store crap that'll break if you look at it wrong. While their best may not be better than our best, their worst is often far better quality than our worst. Their lower end products are often our medium grade tools and blades.
Q:About types of stainless steel for knifes.?
I do engraving on knife blades (actually all kinds of metal but occasionally knife blades). Every company's blades are a little different. I get the idea that different companies have different compounds. All the materials are some compromise between hardness, toughness, corrosion resistance, machineability and other considerations. Stainless is generally not as good as a high-carbon steel, but high-carbon steel rusts and turns black. Stainless is much easier to keep clean.
Q:Cold steel katana?
Save your money and by a wooden boken. Train with a well balanced wooden one. It is how the great Japanese master started their training. Steel swords are good for display. and perhaps if you become relay good and want to feel the heft and practice cutting straw men and bamboo stalks than invest some money in the real deal for a few hundred $$ at the least.
Q:white gold engagement ring with stainless steel wedding band?
Stainless steel is not going to look like white gold. I have some stainless steel pieces from Tiffany (not rings, just earrings and necklaces) and I think they look like.. well, stainless steel. They need to be polished often, and they scratch easily. Thats one thing when youre talking about earrings that just dangle from your ears, but honestly for a ring you are wearing on your hand... I would not go the stainless steel route. I would invest in a better metal that is going to stand the test of time.

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