Trichromatic Fluorescent Powder with High Brightness in China

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Shanghai
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23 kg
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100000 kg/month

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Product Description:

Description of LED Fluorescent:

The degradation of electroluminescent devices depends on frequency of driving current, the luminance level, and temperature; moisture impairs phosphor(Fluorescent Powder) lifetime very noticeably as well.


Festures of LED Fluorescent:

Phosphor layers provide most of the light produced by fluorescent lamps, and are also used to improve the balance of light produced by metal halide lamps. Various neon signs use phosphor layers to produce different colors of light. Electroluminescent displays found, for example, in aircraft instrument panels, use a phosphor layer to produce glare-free illumination or as numeric and graphic display devices. White LED lamps consist of a blue or ultra-violet emitter with a phosphor coating that emits at longer wavelengths, giving a full spectrum of visible light.


Specifications of LED Fluorescent:

Appearance: Yellow crystalline powder

Chemical composition: Rare earth aluminate

Physical stability: waterproof and heatproof. No any changes under -50°C to 300°C in the air.

Chemical stability: under 200°C, brightness >90%; within 1000 hours after encapsulation, brightness decay

Safety: Conform to the RoHS {EU (Restriction of Hazardous Substances)} and all security standards. Non-poisonous, non- radioactivity and do no harm to human and environment.


Images of LED Fluorescent:

Trichromatic Fluorescent Powder with High Brightness in China

 

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We can send you the quotation within 24hours after your inquiry, including the shipping cost if you need.

2.What about payment term?

30% T/T deposit, balance against B/L copy.

Full T/T payment if quantity less than MOQ.

3. What’s your after-sales service?

One-year warranty, and 1% common accessories.

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Q:pigments.....please help?
Mineral Pigments: Lazurite (Lapis Lazuli), Vivianite (Blue Ochre), Riebeckite, Glauconite, Malachite, Jarosite, Limonite, Hematite, Goethite, Celadonite and Shungite Animal Pigments: Tyrian Purple, made from the mucus of a Murex snail Carmine, made from an insect in central and south America, called Cochinilla Natural indigo, made from plants of the genera Indigofera Rose madder, a pigment derived from the plant Rubia tinctorum Gamboge, I think is a dark type of mustard (seeds) Alizarin occurs in the root of the common madder (Rubia tinctorum) and in various parts of Indian madder (Rubia cordifolia). And regarding how they are produced, well each one has it´s own methods. You may want to search each of those names and you can find information for each one. Hope this helps, Bella
Q:what are the accessory pigments in plant photosynthesis?
Accessory Pigments In Photosynthesis
Q:Mac Eyeshadow vs. Mac Pigment... which is a better investment...???
MAC pigments. The color is just so rich and it lasts really long.
Q:What are the accessory pigments and what are their functions?
Accessory pigments are light-absorbing compounds, found in photosynthetic organisms, that work in conjuction with chlorophyll a. They include other forms of this pigment, such as chlorophyll b in green algal and higher plant antennae, while other algae may contain chlorophyll c or d. In addition, there are many non-chlorophyll accessory pigments, such as carotenoids or phycobiliproteins which also absorb light and transfer that light energy to photosystem chlorophylls. Some of these accessory pigments, particularly the carotenoids, also serve to absorb and dissipate excess light energy, or work as antioxidants.
Q:Which of these is NOT a major photosynthetic pigment in plants?
Chlorophylls are greenish pigments which contain a porphyrin ring. This is a stable ring-shaped molecule around which electrons are free to migrate. Because the electrons move freely, the ring has the potential to gain or lose electrons easily, and thus the potential to provide energized electrons to other molecules. This is the fundamental process by which chlorophyll captures the energy of sunlight. There are several kinds of chlorophyll, the most important being chlorophyll a. This is the molecule which makes photosynthesis possible, by passing its energized electrons on to molecules which will manufacture sugars. All plants, algae, and cyanobacteria which photosynthesize contain chlorophyll a. A second kind of chlorophyll is chlorophyll b, which occurs only in green algae and in the plants. A third form of chlorophyll which is common is (not surprisingly) called chlorophyll c, and is found only in the photosynthetic members of the Chromista as well as the dinoflagellates. The differences between the chlorophylls of these major groups was one of the first clues that they were not as closely related as previously thought. Carotenoids are usually red, orange, or yellow pigments, and include the familiar compound carotene, which gives carrots their color. These compounds are composed of two small six-carbon rings connected by a chain of carbon atoms. As a result, they do not dissolve in water, and must be attached to membranes within the cell. Carotenoids cannot transfer sunlight energy directly to the photosynthetic pathway, but must pass their absorbed energy to chlorophyll. For this reason, they are called accessory pigments. One very visible accessory pigment is fucoxanthin the brown pigment which colors kelps and other brown algae as well as the diatoms. From this I would say the answer is c.
Q:how exactly do pigments in a plant work?
Pigments such as chlorophyll that are green color the plant using raw materials.
Q:what is one reason why plants have accessory pigment molecules like chlorophyll b and carotenoids?
They have different absorption maxima to chlorophyll a and so these accessory pigments make light absorption more efficient by absorbing some wavelengths not absorbed by chlorophyll a and thus provide a greater input of light into the reaction centres.
Q:photosynthetic pigments?
Molecular structure... Chlorophylls are greenish pigments which contain a porphyrin ring. This is a stable ring-shaped molecule around which electrons are free to migrate. There are several kinds of chlorophyll, the most important being chlorophyll a. This is the molecule which makes photosynthesis possible, by passing its energized electrons on to molecules which will manufacture sugars. All plants, algae, and cyanobacteria which photosynthesize contain chlorophyll a. A second kind of chlorophyll is chlorophyll b, which occurs only in green algae and in the plants. A third form of chlorophyll which is common is (not surprisingly) called chlorophyll c, and is found only in the photosynthetic members of the Chromista as well as the dinoflagellates. The differences between the chlorophylls of these major groups was one of the first clues that they were not as closely related as previously thought. Carotenoids are usually red, orange, or yellow pigments, and include the familiar compound carotene, which gives carrots their color. These compounds are composed of two small six-carbon rings connected by a chain of carbon atoms. As a result, they do not dissolve in water, and must be attached to membranes within the cell. Carotenoids cannot transfer sunlight energy directly to the photosynthetic pathway, but must pass their absorbed energy to chlorophyll. For this reason, they are called accessory pigments. One very visible accessory pigment is fucoxanthin the brown pigment which colors kelps and other brown algae as well as the diatoms.
Q:does photosythesis requier pigment moulecuels?
Photosynthesis requires Chlorophyll, which is composed of a mixture of pigments like chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and xanthophyll. These pigments allow certain wavelengths of light to be used for photolysis, a required stage of the photosynthetic process.
Q:what looks good with mac melon pigment?
With the Melon pigment, I would recommend using warm, chocolate copper, bronze types of colors. It will provide a nice contrast to the melon while giving your eyes some added depth and definition. As far as brushes go, I like using the 252, large shader brush. This brush picks up pigment nicely and it has nice compressed/dense bristles so you can manipulate and lay the pigment down with greater ease. I like the #286 The dual fiber blending brush for pigments as well. It's made of natural fiber and synthetic fiber. This is a great brush because you really get 2 brushes in 1. With this 'blending' brush you can also use it for targeted color deposits and the synthetic fibers won't suck up what you just laid down and you will get a flawless, beautifully blended eyeshadow application.

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