prepainted Galvanized Coils of Ppgi Coils

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Loading Port:
Shanghai
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
20 m.t.
Supply Capability:
30000 m.t./month

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Product Description:

Specifications:
1. Thickness: 0.12mm-1.3mm
2. Width: 600mm-1250mm
3. Length: According to client's demands
4. Top paint: 15 to 25 um (5 um + 12-20 um)
     Back paint: 7 +/- 2 um
5. Gloss: Normal or High gloss
6. Zinc coating: Z50-Z275G/psm
7. Inside Diameter: 508mm/610mm
8. Outside Diameter: 1000mm-1500mm
9. Coil weight: 3-8 tons
10. Payment: T/T, L/C, D/P, Paypal, Western Union
11. Trade Term: FOB, CFR, CIF
12. MOQ: 25 Mt
13. Package: Export standard package or as request
14. Shipment: By container
15. Standard: AISI, ASTM, BS, DIN, GB, JIS
16. Grade: JIS G3322, CGLCC, ASTM A755, CS-B

Name0.3mm Thickness PPGI Prepainted Galvanized Steel Coil
Resin constructure 
Technique of production
Double painting and double baking process
Productivity150,000Tons/year
Thickness0.12-1.3mm
Width600-1250mm
Coil Weight3-8 Tons
Inside Diameter508mm Or 610mm
Outside Diameter1000mm-1500mm
Zinc CoatingZ50-Z275G/psm
PaintingTop: 15 to 25 um (5 um + 12-20 um) back: 7 +/- 2 um 
StandardJIS G3322 CGLCC ASTM A755 CS-B
SurfSurface coating 
coloace coating type
PE, SMP, HDP, PVDF
Back side coatingcolorLight grey, white and so on 
Application PPGI is featured with light-weight, good looking and 
anticorrosion. It can be processed directly, mainly used for construction industry, 
home electronic apparatus industry, 
electronic apparatus industry, furniture industry and transportation

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Q:steel or vinyl siding?
Steel okorder.com and pick your colors from there. just choose a setting and clickdrag your colors
Q:the difference between mild steel and steel?
As the first answers suggest, the prolbem is that these terms are not specific, they are not scientifically or technically defined. This is like asking: what is the difference between a four door car and a sedan? There are hundreds of steel alloys ranging from Fe + a little C + very little else to alloy and tool steels with significant amounts of Cr, Ni, Si, and a number of other elements + C. And... for any given steel alloy, there are many different ways to heat treat it. A given piece of steel can be heat treated so hard and brittle that it could shatter like glass and then it could be heat treated to make it into a spring or heat treated to make it stretch like taffy. If you really want to understand steels, yes, there are lots of books on sword making (some written by people who actually understand steels) but... you need to study metallurgy. There are graduate level courses just on the metallurgy of steels. Of course to understand this course you need to understand a whole lot of fundamental metallurgy. All this stuff on steel makes perfect sense because, in terms of weight (tonage) produced, steel is, hands down, nothing else remotely comes close, the most important metal humans have.
Q:where can you buy steel from?
This okorder.com/... Most towns have a steel supply house/ business, check your yellow pages. Also check with local welding and machine shops. They can give you ideas and or their suppliers. They often have bits and pieces that you might buy, instead of ordering a full sheet of material. Wingman
Q:question about swords steel?
Steel grades generally tell you how much carbon is in the steel. The higher the number the more carbon. Aside from quality of manufacture, the better swords tend to be 1060 or more. Few quality swords are made from 1045. Which DOES NOtT hold an edge better (quite the reverse). Swords made of these different steels weigh about the same. That is, if you made two identical looking swords - one of 1095 the other of 1045, they would weigh the same. 1045 is only more commonly used because cheaper swords tend to be made from it. Edit: No real swords are made from stainless steel.
Q:Will painted steel rust?
Rust is the process of steel oxidizing when in contact with oxygen, this reaction can be much fast if certain components are present, such as wet air or water. However, if the paint completely isolates the steel from the environment, the encompassed steel will never rust as long as paint shields it. Aluminum corrodes but it does not rust. Rust refers only to iron and steel corrosion. Aluminum is actually very prone to corrosion. However, aluminum corrosion is aluminum oxide, a very hard material that actually protects the aluminum from further corrosion. Aluminum oxide corrosion also looks a lot more like aluminum, so it isn't as easy to notice as rusted iron.
Q:Steel shafted woods vs Graphite woods?
I'd be very surprised if there are any tour players still using steel shafts on their woods (I did actually see Tiger with a steel shaft on a driver during a clinic in 2002). Top end graphite shafts have gotten so much better there's just no reason for pros not to use them anymore. That being said, I use a 45 True Temper stiff steel shaft in my driver (Cobra X-speed, 9.5*). Graphite is longer than steel, but the distance I've lost is minimal (maybe 10 yards and I still put it out there 250+ consistently). The extra weight has actually helped me stay in control which has improved my overall driving considerably, and the very low torque in a steel shaft has paid off huge in accuracy. You're paying minimum $60 (or more) for a graphite shaft with a similar torque rating to any steel shaft. I hit easily twice as many fairways since the switch. I've even switched out my other fairway woods too, the feel and control are so much nicer. I've considered going with a 46 on the driver to try to regain some of the distance, and at $7 per shaft I can actually just go do that whenever I want. Don't get me wrong, if I were playing for money or flirting with par I'd invest in good quality graphite stuff no question, but it doesn't make sense to me right now. I'd recommend to anyone looking for more consistency out of their woods to take $20 to your golf shop and try it out. It's a lot cheaper than the alternatives.
Q:Magnet will not stick to stainless steel?
That's interesting that it caused deflection in the compass. A lot of stainless steels may be SLIGHTLY magnetic, because they have small amounts of ferrite or alpha-iron in them. Ferrite is one of the crystal phases of steel. It has a body-centered cubic (BCC) structure and it's responsible for the magnetism of ordinary steels. Adding certain elements like nickel, manganese, or molybdenum, changes the crystal structure of the steel to a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure, which is NOT magnetic. This crystal phase is known as Austenite or gamma-iron. However most iron alloys contain some impurities that may cause the steel to be not completely transformed into the FCC austenite phase, small areas remain as ferrite.
Q:Steel Price .........!!?
here okorder.com/
Q:Can I put phosphor bronze guitar strings on an acoustic guitar with steel strings?
That's what they're meant for!
Q:whats better? steel irons or graphite?
Graphite is a lot lighter and will allow you to generate more swing speed and probably greater distance. I hit my graphite clubs about one club longer than my steel shafts. But, my steel shafts are far more accurate. I find I hit a lot more greens in regulation using my steel shafted irons than I do with my graphites. Since accuracy is far more important than distance for most people, I choose the steel shafted irons most of the time. You will NEVER see a professional or a low handicapper using graphite irons for this reason.

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