Pre-painted Steel Plate JIS3312 CGCC for Indoor

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China main port
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TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
50 m.t.
Supply Capability:
5000 m.t./month

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Description

JIS G3312, CGCC, DX51D AZ PPGL Prepainted Color Steel Coils / Coil for buildings, vehicles

Main Feature

Stain Resistant/Self Cleaning Capability/High Thermal Resistance/Antistatic Capability/Sterilizing Capability/Finger-print Prevention

PE color coated steel products


Using the latest improvement of the polyester coating (Polyester, abbreviated PE) as the top layer (Topcoat) The double-sided two Tu two bake (2C2B) process production. Direct exposure to the general environment, the corrosion life of up to 7-8 years, but in an industrial environment or serious pollution of the sea area and its service life will be relatively lower.


Recommended use


Suitable for roofing, siding or garage, storage room and downspouts general light industrial, commercial, residential, suburban, rural and other buildings of the like.

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Pre-painted Steel Plate JIS3312 CGCC for Indoor

Pre-painted Steel Plate JIS3312 CGCC for Indoor




Specification

Base Material: HDGI,ALUZINC,CR

Grade: SGCC,DX51D,ASTMA653,EN10142,S350GD

Thickness: 0.2-0.8mm

Width: 600-1250mm

Zinc Coating:60-200g/m2

Paint: PE,PVDF,SMP,HDP

Coil ID: 508

Coil Weight: 3-6mt

JIS3312 CGCC 

FAQ of Package

SStandard export packing, 4 eye bands and 4 circumferential bands in steel, galvanized metal fluted rings on inner and outer edges, galvanized metal and waterproof paper wall protection disk, galvanized metal and waterproof paper around circumference and bore protection


Pre-painted Steel Plate JIS3312 CGCC for Indoor

Pre-painted Steel Plate JIS3312 CGCC for Indoor


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Q:what is brass and steel used for and why?
By instruments do you mean musical instruments? Brass is used for musical instruments because it's strong but very malleable. It's easy to hammer and roll into sheets, or form into tubes and complex shapes. It's easy to work with using hand tools. It's also very corrosion resistant and polishes very well. It has an attractive gold-like color. It also has some effect on sound, though the shape and design of an instrument is much more important to the sound than the material that's used. Apart from musical instruments, brass is used for items that need to be both durable, easy to manufacture, and resistant to the elements. For example plumbing items like valves and screw couplings.brass is a lot easier to cut with machine tools than steel. It's also traditionally used for hardware on doors and cabinets because of it's color, low friction properties, and corrosion resistance. Brass also is toxic to bacteria, and so brass doorknobs disinfect themselves after about 9 hours. Steel is very strong and very cheap. Steel is basically iron with a small amount of carbon added which makes it much stronger. Iron is the fourth most common element in the earth's crust, after oxygen, silicon, and aluminum. Brass being a mixture (an alloy) of copper and zinc, with other metals sometimes added. Copper and zinc are the 27'th and 26'th most common elements. Therefore, it make sense that brass is much more expensive than steel. Steel is used for too many things to be listed. The use of steel technology has impacts on almost every aspect of modern life. Nearly all of the man-made objects you touch on a regular basis were made using steel tools and steel machinery.
Q:Middle name for Steel?
Steel Remington Tompkins Steel Ryder Tompkins Steel Sargent Tompkins Steel Thor Tompkins
Q:i want to see the atomic structure of carbon steel?
This is actually a quite complex question... The atomic arrangement in steels can be controlled over a pretty wide range of different structures. This is really the fundamental reason why steel is such a commonly used material. The different atomic structures produce different physical properties so metallurgists have developed many different processes to control the atomic structure to get the properties they want. One simple answer is that Fe is BCC, body centered cubic at room temperature at equilibrium conditions. When you heat Fe up, it transforms to FCC, face centered cubic. If you continue heating Fe, it goes back to BCC, then it melts. The addition of C makes these structures (and the transformation temperatures) different. Deviating from equilibrium conditions by, for example, cooling very quickly (quenching) creates different atomic structures (one of the most important is known as martensite). Depending on how much C is in the steel, you can also have two different atomic structures (two different phases) present in equilibirum, for example, pearlite which is a mix of alpha Fe (BCC) and iron carbide Fe3C (orthorombic crystal structure). So... you need to think a little more about exactly what you want a picture of. I hope this helps
Q:Flat Steel Bar from Home Depot: What type of steel is this?
1018 mild steel. Not suitable for bladesmithing. If you can't heat treat find an old file, grind it out (keep it cool) and put in an oven 400F. Modern car/truck springs are 5160 med chrome steel, a good blade quality steel and forgiving on the anvil/heat treat.
Q:Does cold steel of kershaw make better knives?
Cold Steel uses an incredible quality of metal. If you want very durable go with that. The benefit to Kershaw is they make better folders. Fixed blade--go with Cold Steel. Folder, go with Kershaw. I get all my knives from the guys below, they have free shipping and really good prices.
Q:What is so special about Japanese steel?
After WWII, The United States in order to help the Japanese get back on their feet, sent over the equipment needed to make the newest types of foundries available at the time. While this was a big boon for the Japanese, this meant that most of our foundries were using the older technologies. Japanese Steel then had a bit of a edge on purity than ours did and when you have a purer steel, you have a better product. Since then, they've stayed at the top of the game when it comes to steel. Not only because of the equipment which we have caught up with them on and stay with them on, but because they also have a stronger tradition regarding steel. They have made quality steel blades that were decades ahead of what the West could produce. So you couple that quality of metallurgy with modern techniques we gave them, they took steel making and and ran with it to be one of the top steel producers in the world. Don't get me wrong. We in the US can make Steel as well as they can. But we have ranges of steel. You can get a steel tool that is as good as a Japanese offering (if not more so) but at the same time you can also get a steel tool that is well...Dollar Store crap that'll break if you look at it wrong. While their best may not be better than our best, their worst is often far better quality than our worst. Their lower end products are often our medium grade tools and blades.
Q:What are surgical steel earrings ?
Surgical steel is a grade of steel often used in medical appliances like tweezers, forceps, etc. It's generally non-reactive and considered very safe. It doesn't contain any special properties against infection--you still have to observe basic hygiene and clean your piercings properly--but most people can wear surgical steel earrings without a problem. However, if you have a contact allergy to base metals like nickel, surgical steel may cause redness or irritation because of the metals used in it. If cheap rings or necklaces make your skin break out in a rash you should NOT wear surgical steel.
Q:Steel vs nylon (elasticity/stress/strain)?
steel is NOT as flexible and much slipperier if you fall the nylon stretches to slow the victim but a steel cable would stop short and kill you
Q:Steel structures....!!?
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Q:Heat Resistant Chemical for Steel?
There is, but I don't know what it is made out of. It is probably some fireproof, foam material which acts like insulation. I doubt it is designed to resist abrasion however. Most things which adhere to metal surfaces are not flameproof, and those which do resist fire are not good insulators. For example, the ceramic coating of appliances like stoves and washing machines adhere very well and are fire resistant, but do not insulate. It was the failure of the steel insulation which caused the collapse of the world trade centers. The impact of the airplane tore away all the insulation on the supporting struts of the building and then the fire caused the steel to soften and break. Steel was once insulated by wrapping it in asbestos cloth and then applying plaster over this to form a shell. It did not actually adhere to the steel but it did insulate it, and was fireproof. However asbestos is a cancer hazard and a lot of old buildings are being stripped of their asbestos as a safety precaution. The asbestos can be replaced with fiberglass which is usually duct taped together.

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