Monocrystalline Silicon Solar Panel for water heater

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10000 watt
Supply Capability:
100000000 watt/month

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Item specifice:

Material: Monocrystalline Silicon Max. Power(W): 25 Number of Cells(pieces): 36
Size: 650×290×25mm

Product Description:

Solar Monocrystalline 125mm Panel Series(20W-25W)


Product Description

1.High efficiency crystalline silicon solar cell. Even if under the weak light, the solar module can produce maximum power output.

2.Tempered glass (toughened glass): Anti-reflecting coating and high transmission rate glass increase the power output and mechanical strength of solar module.

3. EVA and TPT: Using high quality EVA and TPT to prevent destroying and water.

4. AI frame: Without screw, rner connection. 6 holes on the frame can be installed easily.

5. Junction box: Multi function junction box with water proof.

6. Long lifetime: ≥25 years; Less power decrease.

7. Good performance of preventing from atrocious weather such as wind and hails.

8. Resisting moisture and etching effectively, not effected by geology.

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We have organized several common questions for our clients,may help you sincerely:

1.What price for each watt?

 It depends on the quantity, delivery date and payment terms,

2.How do you pack your products?

 We have rich experience on how to pack the panels to make sure the safety on shipment when it arrives at the destination.

 








 








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Q:Buying inverter for a solar panel?
I have an inverter that I use in my vehicle. It is rated for 400 amps this is it's maximum capacity. I can use it for less. It converts 2V DC to 20V AC. So Thais is all I need and may be your cheapest option. If your panels are producing a lot of amperage you may need a regulator to stop charging when your battery is fully charged.
Q:Anybody install solar panels themselves?
i have always been interested in it but the storage (batteries) and power grid tie in (to get paid for excess) technicalities made me shy away. since your getting it installed im sure labor is a huge part of that -OKorder has tons of the equipment. I think wind may be a good home renewable source depending on where you live (cheaper than solar if you got the wind and space) I would doubly check any goverment offerings - I know they used to and maybe still do offer sizable credits if you are within the bureacratic standards so make sure the installers work with you on that. good luck -its new - and going to be a hassle to get right but the world needs more like you. willing to pay more now for a better tommorow (and not just $ wise) you should come out ahead as interest rates and market provides little value on that cash and saving any equipment falure you sound good. does the price include the batteries for all your produce kwh's? panels and labor aside batteries are the next big one
Q:Infra-red solar panels?
Solar panels work when the metals from which they are made release electrons when hit by radiation. There is a threshold that, below a certain wavelength/frequency, they do not eject electrons. As frequency increases, more electricity flows. Radio and infrared are the least energetic electromagnetic waves.
Q:Help with solar panels?
Unless you're very rich, you won't be able to afford solar panels that can meet the average demand of a home. In the US, the average demand for a home is 920 kwh per month, which amounts to 3,833 Watt panels if you assume 8 hours of usable sunshine and don't take into account your location. At current installation rates that's easily a $9,65 project. If you assume a 25 year useful life, it amounts to a return of 3.3% per annum at 0 cents a kwh not counting the costs of repair, insurance, the inverter, any fees to the utility for net metering if any etc. You would be better off putting $9,65 into a mutual fund until better technology or government incentives came along, in some areas, the government subsidies can make it worth your while. Also, keep in mind that in many areas, the net metering arrangements only deducts the power you've generated from your bill so you would want to size the array to meet your base usage in order to get the most from your investments. So meeting your actual needs would result in a loss on the return as there will be months where your usage is less than your average. In theory, if you put $7,208.69 into a mutual fund expected to return 4.4% per annum then you could withdraw enough to pay each month's power bill for 25 years at $0.0 a kwh and therefore be self sufficient through financial means. You would get more mileage focusing on heating and hot water as heating and hot water is 75% of a home's energy use and can be addressed with lower cost technologies like passive solar and solar thermal panels. You have to put it into perspective, it's an investment and you want a return that's competitive with your investment opportunities.
Q:How effective are solar panels?
Well, the maximum amount of energy you can receive with 00 percent efficiency is kilowatt per square meter. This is the energy that hits the Earth's surface. The best commercially available panels are 20-30 percent efficient. Cutting edge technology has gotten this percentage up to 50 percent, but you can't buy these for your home. If you're curious about efficiency, check out a panel's dimensions, find the area in square meters, and use that along with its Watts (divide by 000 to get kilowatts) to get your answer.
Q:Silicon, Polychristaline, or Solar Panel?
Let me help you get an idea of what you are talking about as your notes seems a bit jumbled. Mostly when they refer to a silicon solar cell they mean that the silicon is one crystal of silicon. (very much like a diamond, but with atoms of silicon instead of carbon). A single perfect crystal of silicon can be grown that is very large at temperatures near the melting point of silicon or around 400C and then is sawed up to create electronics or solor cells. Polycrystalline :) solar cells are also made of silicon, but instead of a single crystal it is made of a jumble of small crystals that have different sizes and directions. So these types of solar cells can be made using a silicon gas (siline: SiH4) at much lower temperatures 600-700C. So these are less expensive to make, but because they are not perfect crystals a poly solar panel that is the same size as a crystalline solar panel will make less energy. I hope that helps.
Q:Solar Panel House?
Where can we get the solar panels? I think you will have to buy it on OKorder Solar Panels can be used to heat water and heaters. When you get the solar panels, they should be in the direction that the sun rises in your country. They should be allowed to come into direct contact with sunlight for most of the day in order for the solar panels to be used to its max.
Q:Reflectors or mirrors around the solar panels.......?
In the 70's when silicon was really expensive, they played with using fresnel lenses to focus the sunlight on small solar cells but these panels had to be on heliostats and aimed directly at the Sun. These days, with nano-technology, there's a renewed interest in the concept but the fundamental weakness is that there are diminishing returns, at some point, it's just less expensive to have more solar cells.
Q:Solar panel placement idea?
outside is going to be much better. You can't tell but glass is actully opaque to many ranges of 'light'. If you look at advertising for windows you may see claims to reduce sun fading of your carpet/ furniture. That is because the glass blocks UV. Solar panels get some of their energy from UV light. Also some windows are engineered to block IR to help insulate better when the house is cooler than the outside. Again, solar panels get some of their energy from light in the infrared range. And finally if you're charging batteries the 'off angle time' is still important. The amount of light absorbed is pretty closely related to the cosine of the angle that the sun is 'off' of the direct. so when the sun is 45 degrees off of perpendicular the panels still get cos45 =.707 or about 70% of the available energy. (In practice it's a little less than that because not as much energy gets to the panel to be absorbed as at midday). But anyway, you can figure two hours of morning or late afternoon sun will give you as much energy as hour of midday sun. So if the panel is inside, you miss out on that available energy.
Q:Solar Panel questions...?
The demand for residential solar power is growing rapidly. Traditionally, this has been very expensive, ranging between $0,000 and $$40,000 for an average home. Many states have rebates and other financial incentives for solar conversions, but the cost is still out of most people’s reach. What many people don’t realize is that you can save most of the up-front costs by building solar panels for your home yourself. With the many DIY solar kits available now, building a solar panel is simple enough for the average person to do. In fact, you can download your guide right now for under $50, make a trip to the hardware store and pick up your materials for under $200 and get started today.

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