Hot Dipped Galvanized Steel Coil for Mechanics Manufacuring

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Product Description:

Basic Info.

Model NO.:GT00818

Surface Treatment:Galvanized

Additional Info.

Packing:At buyer′s requirement



HS Code:72123000

Production Capacity:50,000 mt/year

Product Description

Commodity: Hot dipped galvanized steel coil

Size: Thickness: 0.20mm to 1.2mm; Width: 500mm to 820mm

Surface finish: Regular spangle; Small spangle

Surface treatment: Chromated passivation

Zinc coating: Z08, Z12, Z18

Packing: Mill's standard packing for exporting

Usage: used in the industries such as construction ,cold rolling forming and electro mechanics manufacturing, household electric appliance manufacturing and etc

Standard adopted: GB/T2518-1998;Also we supply such steel strips according to JIS,ASTM standard to meet users'requirements.

Steel grade: Q195,Q195L,SPCC(Other material require agreement )

Equivalent standard: JIS G3302 1998 or ASTM A653M/A924M 1998

Price Terms: FOB, CIF Term

Payment Terms: T/T, L/C at sight

Delivery: 15 days after receiving your valid L/C/down payment  

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Q:At what temperature would steel evaporate?
Steel is to broad. There are many types of steel with different melting/boiling points. Iron* has a boiling point of 5182 °F and a Heat of vaporization of 340 kJ·mol−1. iron is the main ingredient of steel, along with carbon and other various elements.
Q:mild steel properties?
Be *real cautious* using HCL round stainless. A lowering acid like HCL will wreck down the oxide layer on the stainless, and corrosion will proceed. So far as i do know, there is not any scale down level at which HCL will not attack the skin oxide, however at very low concentrations maybe somewhat rust/pitting/corrosion is not going to be a main issue. Oxidizing acids like nitric, and to a couple measure sulfuric, will passivate stainless under the right conditions. But on simple, mild steels, corrosion will proceed to form FeCl and FeSO4 corrosion merchandise. The corrosion will haven't any outcomes on tensile, hardness or affect until ample fabric has been eliminated via corrosion to make a measurable change. Hydrogen embrittlement is a likelihood if there's constant anxiety, and hydrogen is advanced in corrosion. Whether or not it is a challenge would rely on the drawback.
Q:Why not use stainless steel to make coins?
Stainless steel has been used by some countries to make coins, but it's not an ideal metal. When a coin is struck, a die comes down and strikes the blank with many tons of force (the blank is also sitting on top of another die--one has the image on the obverse (front) of the coin, while the other die has the image of the reverse of the coin). When the die strikes the blank, the force causes the metal in the blank to flow into the recesses of the die. The problem with stainless steel is that it doesn't want to flow into the die. To get an image, either the relief (how high the raised portion of the design will be) has to be very low, and the coin has to have a simple design, or they have to greatly increase the pressure of the strike. This slows the coining press down, and greatly shortens the life of the dies.
Q:hard ionized vs stainless steel cookware?
Hard anodized generally refers to aluminum that has had a specific surface treatment. The benefit of aluminum is that it's a better conductor of heat than stainless, so it will heat up faster, depending on thickness. It's also lighter than steel, if that matters to you. As far as stainless steel, it all depends on the quality of the steel and of the construction. Some pots and pans are made from cheap grades of stainless which can suffer from corrosion problems. Though this shouldn't affect the taste of the food, only the appearance of the pan. Companies making bargain products may also skimp on materials by making the metal thinner; this causes hot-spots when cooking, In the case of skillets, thinner materials are more likely to warp over time. Stainless steel is generally stronger and tougher than aluminum- less likely to dent. Thought again, strength also depends on thickness. A good quality stainless pan is hard to beat in terms of durability, these things can last several lifetimes. On the other hand so will a good quality aluminum one.
Q:Carbon Steel or Stainless Steel? ?
If your talking about a folding pocket knife, I think that it's basically six one way and a half dozen the other. I actually do prefer stainless for my pocket knives. I don't want to oil a knife to the degree I feel carbon requires, only to then stick it my pocket to attract dirt to the knife and oil to my pants. I'm the exact opposite on sheath knives though. I like 1095 carbon steel, plain edge sheath knives. I'll thrash on them HARD, and I rarely have major edge problems. Of course, I require them to be coated with some kind of powder coat or the like, because they can rust, but I do try and keep them clean and dry when in the sheath, so they won't pit the uncoated edge. My reasons for this sheath knife preference is multi-fold. First, these knives are simply affordable. I don't spend $80 dollars on a outdoors sheath knife. I use the tool too hard to want to spend more. I don't like the more traditional stainless steels such as AUS-8, 420HC, and 440C (not to mention the HORRENDOUS 440A) because I feel that the all else being equal, a stainless blade will bend before a carbon blade will break. I also think that carbon holds an edge at least as well, if not better, than traditional stainless, and it's much easier to hone. I don't know much about these new laminates, other than the very hard, but not so tough. They seem to be POSSIBLY too brittle for my use. That, combined with the fact that they cost a FORTUNE, means that I just won't be considering them.
Q:Quality of Cold Steel Recon 1 (folding knife)?
I think that 440 stainless steel is pretty good. I like Gerber,Kershaw knives in 440 stainless steel. D2 steel is also as good or better than 440. I am not sure of Taiwan/China steel.
Q:Coating on Steel Wool?
It will be very effective if you remove the oil by appling protective polymer spin coating to the edge, top and underside of the wafer, which makes those surfaces impervious to most chemical etchants. To learn more about the spin coating theory you may check out the following source.
Q:how do you get broken steel?
There is no way to survive that bit, you always die. That's why you save just before you do that quest, leave, do EVERYTHING ELSE there is to do, and then when you're finally sick of the game do it. Anyway Broken Steel is a DLC pack for Fallout 3 that makes you survive that. It ups the level cap, continues the game, adds new missions and weapons and adds tougher monsters to fight. It's one of the best DLC for the game IMO. I'm not sure if it's released yet for the PS3 version, but it will be out soon if it isn't. Check the Playstation store from the PS3 main menu.
Q:Can you use steel strings on a classical guitar?
NO ! NO! NO! Do not put steel strings on a classical guitar!! The increased tension can actually damage the guitar by causing the top to warp and can eventually pull the bridge right off of the guitar! I have seen it happen more than once! Ignore the other post, they are wrong! Classical guitars are designed to use nylon strings only!
Q:what is a better grade of steel?
SAE 440 is the best. Classified as high grade cutlery steel. There are various grades of 440: A, B, C, and F. 440 A is the most stain resistant while 440 C has the most carbon and can achieve the highest hardness (Best edge Retention). SAE 440 Chemistry: 16 - 18% Chromium, 0.60 - 1.2% Carbon, 0.75% Molybdenum. SAE 420 is pretty good. Classified as cutlery steel, it is a stain resistant grade but has less chromium and significantly less carbon than SAE 440. SAE 420 Chemistry: 12 - 14% Chromium, 0.15% Carbon (min), 0 Molybdenum Chromium is what makes the steel corrosion resistant. It also adds toughness. Molybdenum adds extra corrosion resistance and adds hardenability. So you can see by chemical components that 440 is highest quality although that also means more cost. 1045 and 1065 are low quality steels and you should probably never use them for a knife. The 1 indicates plain carbon steel with little other alloying elements. The last two digits indicate how much carbon is in the steel. 1045 has 0.45% carbon, mid-range hardenability. 1065 has 0.65% carbon, high hardenability. So if I had to choose I would choose 1065 over 1045 but the difference isn't that noticeable. Everything I said here assumes they have all had the optimum Quench and Temper heat-treatment for their chemistry grade.

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