Hot dipped Galvanized Steel Coil 508mm

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Product Description:

Steel Grade & Standard: ASTM A653
Zinc Coating Mass:Z180  Spangle:Zero Spangle
Surface Treatment: non-chromate, oiled  
Coil ID:508mm  Coil Weight:6-10MT
Package Type:EYE TO SIDE
Thickness Tolerance:+/-0.02mm  Width Tolerance:+/-5mm
Zinc Coating Tolerance:-/+10g/m2

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Q:What is the best steel for making knives?
Without Plus few other useful resources. In the end, there's no one best steel, not even 5. It all depends on the knife design, use, edge thickness, what you cut, etc...
Q:Is stainless steel magnetic?
If the non magnetic one is has a brighter finish it may be that it is a ferritc stainless steel which depends only on high chromium content to keep it stainless,the duller one is likely to be the austenitic type which contains nickel as well as chromium and is usually non or only faintly magnetic and with a dull finish.Chromium rich stainless steels(ferritic and martensitic grades) are designed to be used for cutlery and strength application are always strongly magnetic (quite often permanent magnets).Stainless steels containing at least 18%chromium and 8+% of nickel are designed to be corrosion resistant and weldable,this type of steel(austenitic) is not ferromagnetic in the annealed state but the lower grades do become magnetic after cold work(hammering bending etc.The difference between magnetic grade or not rests in the crystal structure.In the austenitic types the structure is the same as that of gold and copper which is cubic close pack and,in steel,is a non magnetic form;but in low grades cold working can cause some breakdown of the austenite to the magnetic room temperature form of iron known as ferrite.Ferrite has the ordinary body centred body centred cubic form of iron which is magnetic.All of the stainless steels depend upon Chromium to form an anti-corrosion barrier at their surface;but this is only reliable in oxidising conditions(like the open air)They nearly all discolour and even rust if trapped in damp conditions where oxygen potential is low(as under wet plastic or underground ).
Q:what is brass and steel used for and why?
By instruments do you mean musical instruments? Brass is used for musical instruments because it's strong but very malleable. It's easy to hammer and roll into sheets, or form into tubes and complex shapes. It's easy to work with using hand tools. It's also very corrosion resistant and polishes very well. It has an attractive gold-like color. It also has some effect on sound, though the shape and design of an instrument is much more important to the sound than the material that's used. Apart from musical instruments, brass is used for items that need to be both durable, easy to manufacture, and resistant to the elements. For example plumbing items like valves and screw couplings.brass is a lot easier to cut with machine tools than steel. It's also traditionally used for hardware on doors and cabinets because of it's color, low friction properties, and corrosion resistance. Brass also is toxic to bacteria, and so brass doorknobs disinfect themselves after about 9 hours. Steel is very strong and very cheap. Steel is basically iron with a small amount of carbon added which makes it much stronger. Iron is the fourth most common element in the earth's crust, after oxygen, silicon, and aluminum. Brass being a mixture (an alloy) of copper and zinc, with other metals sometimes added. Copper and zinc are the 27'th and 26'th most common elements. Therefore, it make sense that brass is much more expensive than steel. Steel is used for too many things to be listed. The use of steel technology has impacts on almost every aspect of modern life. Nearly all of the man-made objects you touch on a regular basis were made using steel tools and steel machinery.
Q:STAINLESS Steel....?
Stainless Steel is named that because when compared to untreated steel it is virtually stainless. It is virtually stainless, and harbors very little germs and bacteria. That is why it has been the standard in the food industry for years.
Q:what type of steel is used to make rail tracks?
I don't know what the technical name is, but steel used in rail is higher in carbon content. There is a trade-off as the higher carbon content tends to make them more brittle, and those rails with the highest carbon content are used exclusively for tight curvature in heavy grade. It's amazing to watch the welders with this stuff. Torches take too long, so diamond saws are utilized for cutting. The stuff is more problematic in severe cold, too. Railroading in the mountains as I've always done, nighttime and its severe chill causes pull - aparts, due to the contraction of CWR (Continuous Welded Rail) as a result of the cold, at least two or three times a week. In an extended deep freeze, the problems are nightly. What is interesting to note is that the pull aparts tend to happen with equal frequency regardless of whether a part of tangent track or curve. Still, I'd rather have it under me. I know it caused some major problems on the SP in the '80s, but it was cheaper, imported steel that was the significant part of the problem, not so much the high carbon content. Once again, you can't beat US steel.
Q:what steel is best for a survival/utility knife?
INFI steel used by Busse Combat is probably one of the best steels around right now, but the price reflects that. The heat treat is a HUGE part of the toughness of a steel. A good heat treat can make a bad steel a good one, or a good one a great one. I personally prefer 1095. It's a good ole tool steel on the lower end of the price scale and it holds up well. I've always had good experiences with 1095.
Q:What is the level of dependability of 1055 carbon steel?
1055 Steel
Q:drilling through stainless steel shelving.?
I've had a similar experience attempting to drill heavy steel. Most stainless steel formulations are even harder than mild steel. First, you will need a much more powerful drill. A 9.6v cordless is just not going to do the job. You will want a large corded drill - I'd recommend a half-inch bit chuck. If possible, use a drill press - they typically house very powerful drills, and make holding and aligning the drill much easier. Second, you will need a very, very hard bit. Carbide-tipped is critical. Third, you will need a good deal of patience, depending on the thickness of the steel. Good luck.
Q:Which industries consume the most steel?
I'm guessing manufacturing
Q:Why should you heat thicker steel before welding?
For most mild steel, it is not necessary to preheat the steel, even in thick sections. Preheating, as well as maintaining interpass temperatures is sometime used when welding high-strength or high-performance steels. This reduces the likelihood of weld cracks. Mild steel is ductile enough that weld cracks aren't usually a problem. Preheating reduces the speed at which the weld cools and solidifies. in high-strength steels, this produces a more ductile microstructure in the weld and heat affected zone, thus reducing the possibility of hot and cold cracks. This also may improve some of the mechanical properties of the H.A.Z., such as impact toughness. The slower cooling rate allows more time for hydrogen to diffuse out of the weld, reducing the potential for hydrogen embrittlement. Hydrogen is produced when water vapor reacts with the steel at high temperatures, producing iron oxide and hydrogen gas. Some steels can be damaged by even relatively small amounts of hydrogen. Electrodes used in flux core arc welding and in shielded metal arc welding often contain fluxes which tend to absorb moisture from the air. Also, rust and mill scale contain water molecules which are chemically bound to the iron atoms. Note that hydrogen embrittlement is generally not an issue with mild steel, due to it's low carbon and alloy content. Preheating also reduces shrinkage stresses, due to the slower cooling rate. This is beneficial in parts which are heavily restrained, or where distortion is a particular concern.

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