Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil with Prime Quality

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Loading Port:
Shanghai
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
200 m.t.
Supply Capability:
10000 m.t./month

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1.Structure of Galvanized Steel Coil Description

Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications.

2.Main Features of the Galvanized Steel Coil

• Base material for countless outdoor and industrial applications

• High corrosion resistance

 High strength

 Good formability

• Rust- proof ability

• Good visual effect

3.Galvanized Steel Coil Images

Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil with Prime  Quality 

 

4.Galvanized Steel Coil Specification

Operate Standard: ASTM A653M-04/JIS G3302/DIN EN10143/GBT 2518-2008

Grade : SGCD,SGCH, Q195,DX51D

Zinc coating :40-180g( as required)

Width:914-1250mm(914mm, 1215mm,1250mm,1000mm the most common)

Coil id:508mm/610mm

Coil weight: 4-10 MT(as required)

Surface: regular/mini/zero spangle, chromated, skin pass, dry etc.

Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil with Prime  Quality

Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Coil with Prime  Quality

 

5.FAQ of Galvanized Steel Coil 

We have organized several common questions for our clients,may help you sincerely: 

1.How to guarantee the quality of the products?

We have established the international advanced quality management system,every link from raw material to final product we have strict quality test;We resolutely put an end to unqualified products flowing into the market. At the same time, we will provide necessary follow-up service assurance.

2. What is the minimum order quantity ?  

Our MOQ is 50mt for each size. And we will consider to give more discount if you make big order like 1000 tons and more. Further more, the more appropriate payment term your offer the better price we can provide. 

3.How long can we receive the product after purchase?

Usually within thirty working days after receiving buyers advance payment or LC. We will arrange the factory manufacturing as soon as possible. The cargo readiness usually takes 15-25 days, but the shipment will depend on the vessel situation.

 

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Q:What are the characteristics of hot-rolled steel coils and cold rolled steel coils? What loading and unloading tools should be used? What items should be paid attention to?
Steel is usually stable in performance. One thing is that the environment should be dry, not rain, because the damp environment is easy to rust. As long as it's in a dry room, it's basically no problem.
Q:Why is the American steel industry failing?
Q:What is the best steel to use for making a knife?
O-1 is an excellent steel. If you've never made a knife before find an old file and use it. My first knives weren't that good, it took a little practice to get the geometry right so be prepared to burn some steel. The advantage of a file is it is already hardened, unless you have a torch or forge that will be near imposable for you to do. The most important thing in knife making is the heat treating. The best steel wont perform like it's supposed to. If you decide to use a file grind your blade out, keep the steel cool; do not let it get any color in it (brown, blue, purple) as this destroys the temper. When your finished put the blade in the oven at 400 deg for an hour. It should have a good hardness for a knife then. As for me, I use old car springs(5160), saw blades(L-6) for many of my blades, Good luck.
Q:Damascus steel sword question?
There are many makers that use blue on there Damascus. My question, what the heck are you wanting to mess with the finish for? If you had a true Damascus blade made that that thing cost a fortune, and I don't mean under a grand either. Then there is the question of what it is made from, some steel combinations react well to the gun blue, others not so much. If it is a stainless blade it won't work at all and you shouldn't be using it either. I can tell you, my Damascus blades start at $100 for a small cable knife and go up from there. If you wanted a sword it would push 10 g's easy. None of my customers would mess with the finish, most would cry if it got scratched. If it's has a pretty pattern don't mess with it.
Q:Stainless Steel Used In Knifes?
If your talking about a folding pocket knife, I think that it's basically six one way and a half dozen the other. I actually do prefer stainless for my pocket knives. I don't want to oil a knife to the degree I feel carbon requires, only to then stick it my pocket to attract dirt to the knife and oil to my pants. I'm the exact opposite on sheath knives though. I like 1095 carbon steel, plain edge sheath knives. I'll thrash on them HARD, and I rarely have major edge problems. Of course, I require them to be coated with some kind of powder coat or the like, because they can rust, but I do try and keep them clean and dry when in the sheath, so they won't pit the uncoated edge. My reasons for this sheath knife preference is multi-fold. First, these knives are simply affordable. I don't spend $80 dollars on a outdoors sheath knife. I use the tool too hard to want to spend more. I don't like the more traditional stainless steels such as AUS-8, 420HC, and 440C (not to mention the HORRENDOUS 440A) because I feel that the all else being equal, a stainless blade will bend before a carbon blade will break. I also think that carbon holds an edge at least as well, if not better, than traditional stainless, and it's much easier to hone. I don't know much about these new laminates, other than the very hard, but not so tough. They seem to be POSSIBLY too brittle for my use. That, combined with the fact that they cost a FORTUNE, means that I just won't be considering them.
Q:What is purpose of providing steel in compression zone in Doubly reinforced beam ?
There are several reasons to add compression steel. Keep in mind, supported steel (meaning it can't buckle) resists compression as well. Compression steel helps reduce long term deflections. Concrete creeps under sustained loads. Steel lessens the compression, meaning less sustained compressive stress to cause creep deflection. It makes members more ductile. Since the steel takes some of the compressive stress, the compression block depth is reduced, increasing the strain in the tension steel at failure, resulting in more ductile behavior (the moment at first yield remains largely the same with compression steel added, but the increase in capacity after yield is significant). Compression steel insures that the tension steel yields before the concrete crushes, meaning it helps change the failure mode to tension controlled. It makes beams easier to construct. With bars in the top and bottom, you have longitudinal reinforcement in all 4 corners of the shear stirrups to keep them in place when pouring the concrete. Also, for continuous members, its often easier to run your negative moment steel the full length of the beam rather than trying to cut it off in the positive moment regions. Serviceability concerns. You're going to end up putting steel in that region anyway to for temperature and shrinkage.
Q:What is so special about Japanese steel?
After WWII, The United States in order to help the Japanese get back on their feet, sent over the equipment needed to make the newest types of foundries available at the time. While this was a big boon for the Japanese, this meant that most of our foundries were using the older technologies. Japanese Steel then had a bit of a edge on purity than ours did and when you have a purer steel, you have a better product. Since then, they've stayed at the top of the game when it comes to steel. Not only because of the equipment which we have caught up with them on and stay with them on, but because they also have a stronger tradition regarding steel. They have made quality steel blades that were decades ahead of what the West could produce. So you couple that quality of metallurgy with modern techniques we gave them, they took steel making and and ran with it to be one of the top steel producers in the world. Don't get me wrong. We in the US can make Steel as well as they can. But we have ranges of steel. You can get a steel tool that is as good as a Japanese offering (if not more so) but at the same time you can also get a steel tool that is well...Dollar Store crap that'll break if you look at it wrong. While their best may not be better than our best, their worst is often far better quality than our worst. Their lower end products are often our medium grade tools and blades.
Q:Melting steel????
more than 300° F
Q:What happened to the comic book STEEL??? not the movie!!!?
Was cancelled after the 25th issue or so....the movie probably killed the comic too!
Q:Sstainless steel sword?
i like how you asked this in the Card Games section.

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