hot-dip galvanized/ auzinc steel in good quality

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30 m.t.
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5000000 m.t./month

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Product Description:


1.Mateials:SGCC,DX51D /   DX52D /S250,280GD  

2.Size:width:600-1250mm(900mm,1215mm,1250mm,1000mm the most common)


    length:1000-6000mm,as your require

3.Zinc coating :60-180g( as required)

4.Coil id:508mm

5.Coil weight: 3-5MT(as required)

6. Surface:regular/mini/zero spangle, chromated, skin pass, dry etc.


 Applications of our Galvalume Coil: 

Galvalume Coil widely used for roofing products, It is also the ideal base material for Prepainted Steel Coil.

1.      roofing

2.      gutters

3.      unexposed automotive parts

4.      appliances

5.      furniture 

6.      outdoor cabinetry


Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications.

Production of cold formed corrugated sheets and profiles for roofing, cladding, decking, tiles, sandwich walls, rainwater protective systems, air conditioning duct as well as electrical appliances and engineering.


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Q:1. What has a higher bending strength: stainless steel 304 or chrome vanadium steel?
Type 304 stainless steel can be tempered to give tensile strength up to about 125,000 psi. There are many chrome vanadium alloys, and tempers, but they are generally very hard steels used for machine tools which are used to cut other steels. They generally are much stronger, and can be hardened up to tensile strengths of 250,000 psi and beyond. (Bending strength is proportional to tensile strength, but Cr-V steels are not usually used for beams or other structure members.) Cr-V steels are specialty alloys and will probably be a good bit more expensive per pound than common stainless alloys. For any steel, price depends on the form you are buying, i.e. plate, bar, or other shape, as well as the alloy and temper specified, and the quantity. You need to get prices from a supplier. You can find some online catalogs, but you usually have to call the vendor for price info.
Q:How are steel tape measures installed?
The spring piece is fixed on the shaft, the other end is connected with the measuring tape core, fixed tape shell with a shaft, the spring plate and a circle around the axis of the ruler core, wrapped after the ruler core extends from the outer end of the incision length of the shell, gently pull, the spring is tightened, the pull out the part from the incision and then removed around the shaft, then gently pull out, and then put the ruler core tied to the shaft, removed from the incision so repeatedly, until the spring to put all the ruler core recovery. Then a cotter pin on the central shaft installed on the lid, will tighten the screws.
Q:Is steel in spacecraft Ulysses?
Steel might have been used in some bolts sure. But.....are you under the impression that Ulysses was ever intended to crash into the Sun or something? You know it wasn't right? It was launched (in the 1980's) to study the Sun. But....uh.....not by crashing into it. Ulysses was even sent out to use Jupiter as a gravitational assist. We are closer to the Sun than Ulysses is..... Even if it did go crash into the Sun though there is absolutely no way that ANY material, natural or manmade, could survive intact all the way to the core of a star. It takes photons of LIGHT something like 100,000 years just to make it out from the core of the Sun to the surface because it is so dense. How do you propose a metal probe making it back the other way? Would it have worse effects than what? The effects, no matter what it was made out of, would be that as it got CLOSE to the Sun it would vaporize. No matter what it was made out of though it would have no affect whatsoever on the Sun. Every single element, without exception, that exists on the Earth and everywhere else in our solar system also exists in the Sun already, in far greater quantities. The planets and Sun all formed out of the same nebula at the same time. The Sun just got massive enough that fusion began and it became a star. There is already more iron in the Sun than there is everything on Earth. If you took every single atom of every element there is on the Earth it would still not add up to even a fraction of the total amount of iron in the Sun.
Q:is batman in man of steel?
No Batman will be in the next superman film think it's scheduled for next year
Q:Stainless steel or Carbon steel knives?
If your talking about a folding pocket knife, I think that it's basically six one way and a half dozen the other. I actually do prefer stainless for my pocket knives. I don't want to oil a knife to the degree I feel carbon requires, only to then stick it my pocket to attract dirt to the knife and oil to my pants. I'm the exact opposite on sheath knives though. I like 1095 carbon steel, plain edge sheath knives. I'll thrash on them HARD, and I rarely have major edge problems. Of course, I require them to be coated with some kind of powder coat or the like, because they can rust, but I do try and keep them clean and dry when in the sheath, so they won't pit the uncoated edge. My reasons for this sheath knife preference is multi-fold. First, these knives are simply affordable. I don't spend $80 dollars on a outdoors sheath knife. I use the tool too hard to want to spend more. I don't like the more traditional stainless steels such as AUS-8, 420HC, and 440C (not to mention the HORRENDOUS 440A) because I feel that the all else being equal, a stainless blade will bend before a carbon blade will break. I also think that carbon holds an edge at least as well, if not better, than traditional stainless, and it's much easier to hone. I don't know much about these new laminates, other than the very hard, but not so tough. They seem to be POSSIBLY too brittle for my use. That, combined with the fact that they cost a FORTUNE, means that I just won't be considering them.
Q:How can a spider's web be stronger than steel?
Lol I dont know where you heard that, there probably saying for small insects like for instence a small instect in a spider web is like us( humans ) in steel but no I could break through a web with my soft hair or finger, like not an ant because there extremely strong but like a flea
Q:Damascus steel knife?
Pattern welded /damascus is too expensive to use as an everyday knife, as it can cost more than silver. It's best kept as a collection piece. You'd be stupid to keep it in your pocket or use it everyday. that would be a waste of money. Knives you use everyday might be lost or stolen, or they may get rusted, worn, or dirty..... ruining their value. From that point of view the strength or edge-holding ability means very little. Specifically, the bushcraft knife is pattern welded steel. True damascus or Wootz steel is something you'll only find in museums and private collections. they stopped making it several hundred years ago. Despite what many people have claimed, Wootz damascus was inferior to modern tool steels in every respect. It was a brittle, dirty material. It's legendary status has more to do with myth and storytelling. The reason they stopped making was undoubtaby because more modern methods came along that produced a more consistent product, more quickly and easily. Old technologies tend to be abandoned for good reasons. With pattern welded steel, about a dozen strips of two different grades of steel have been stacked, welded together, the twisted and forged to create interesting patterns. This more of an artistic process and doesn't improve the properties of modern steels. Pattern welded steel is for the most part, inferior to a homogenous blade made of a single grade of steel. First of all, PW is a handmade product which means there will be faults and oxide inclusions incorporated into the steel. The welding process is not perfect. Secondly, in the hardening and tempering process you end up with a compromise between the properties of the two different grades of steel. You end up with a product that is not quite as good as either steel would have been individually. The blade may either be too brittle or too soft.
Q:Are solid steel or synthetic violin strings better?
Q:austenitic stainless steels?
Q:Stainless steel laminate?
There appliance paint 2. What you are referring to really is not laminate steel sheets, it's actually more along the lines of shelf liner paper looks like steel with sticky back film that you peel and stick. Place against product and begin to peel down slowly using squeegee or credit card to smooth out bubbles.Sheets can be purchased rangingin size on OKorder for $9.99 + dependent on size. Called stainless steel appliance film can buy a roll for $60.00 on OKorder (normally sells for $100.00) one roll will cover 3 average sized kitchen appliances. Hope this helps!

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