HOT-DIP GALVANIZED/ ALUZINC STEEL in China

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Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
50 m.t.
Supply Capability:
5000000 m.t./month

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Product Description:

THICKNESS:0.18mm-1.5mm

WIDTH:900mm-1250mm

COATING MASS:AZ30-AZ150

SPANGLE:Minimized Spangle,Zero Spangle

SURFACE TREATMENT:N0on or Chromated,Non or Oiled,Non or Anti Finger Print

COIL INNER DIAMETER:508mm/610mm

COIL WEIGHT:3mt-7m

 

Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications.

 

We can ensure that stable quality standards are maintained, strictly meeting both market requirements and customers’ expectations. Our products enjoy an excellent reputation and have been exported to Europe, South-America, the Middle-East, Southeast-Asia, Africa and Russia etc.. We sincerely hope to establish good and long-term business relationship with your esteemed company.


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Q:Should I buy steel toe boots or soft toe boots?
If I was you, I would get steel toe boots, because I got soft toe boots and at the toe part, it dented in, because I used them for riding dirtbikes, I wish I would of got steel toe boots, u should get steel toe because later on you might wish u would of got them:) hope this help
Q:what are some advantages of stainless steel?
I would go for stainless steel cookware. There are some advantages of stainless steel cookware that make it so popular. *Durable: stainless steel is tough and can last for years and decades. It is not prone to chipping, rusting or even staining. It won’t dent and scratch easily as well. It is basically indestructible kind of cookware. it can also handle extreme temperatures. *Hard and non-porous. *Appearance: it will remain looking brand new for a long time and this is not because of its high maintenance. *Flavor preservation: stainless steel cookware is made in such a manner that none of the metals in the alloy will be tasted in the food cooked and neither will any of the material come in the food. *Recyclable: in an event where the cookware does get damaged, it can be recycled or salvaged. *Safe: while using stainless steel cookware, you need not be worried about any kind of metal poisoning.
Q:Are there different types of steel that are used in construction of beach houses that withstand corrosion?
No, usually they are just coated or galvanized. To make a steel that is truly more corrosion resistant raises it's cost quite markedly, where as coatings are pretty cheap. Almost all structural steel is just A36 mild steel (like 0.1% carbon, 0.05% Mn, and not much else). There are higher grades of structural steel, and bridges are made with truly more corrosion resistant carbon steels, but for a house it's just not the case.
Q:Whats better chrome vanadium steel or carbon stainless steel?
You pay your money and take your choice. High carbon non-stainless steels are easier to sharpen and hold their cutting edge longer than stainless. Stainless steels generally are rust resistant, not rust-proof. However, there are more than 40 types of steels being used for knife-making. Probably the best in the stainless range are the American Hi-performance Stainless Steels. These are graded as; CPM440V, CPM420V, CPM10V, CPM3V and 154-CM. Incidentally, nearly all knife steels contain carbon in varying amounts. The only one that I am aware of that does not contain any carbon is Sandvic12C-27.
Q:Why is stainless steel rust proof?
Stainless steel is characterized by the presence of chromium. Chromium oxidizes like aluminium does, by passivation, that is, it forms a though oxide layer that sticks to the metal underneath and protects it. On the other hand, iron oxidizes by turning into rust, which is a brittle material that flakes off, exposing the metal under for more oxidation. Now, what happens when you have a metal that is made of both iron and chromium? Any iron on the surface will rust and flake off (at the atomic level, so do not expect to see much rusting) until the surface is a pure chromium layer (again, we are talking about a layer that is a few atoms thick) and that chromium will oxidize but stay put. Then rust then has no way of getting deeper, and the metal will remain clean.
Q:Components of Steel?
Steel is iron and carbon.
Q:Steel used to be made in the \Bessemer Converter...?
how we can prepared steel by using converter? ans it
Q:Stainless Steel lock?
any pair of larger bolt cutters would whack right thru that lock brother. use it, but put a backup lock on somewhere else too. thx for the pic!
Q:how carbon is being alloyed during steel making?
Steel is usually made in a two-step process. As you may know, carbon, in the form of coke, is added to the iron ore during the initial smelting process. This is the first step. The conversion of iron ore into raw iron is accomplished with a blast furnace. Carbon dissolves with the iron during the smelting process. The amount of carbon in the iron is generally not controlled at this point as this would be too difficult, the excess carbon is removed in the next step. The result is pig iron which is crude iron that has a very high carbon content, and a large amount of impurities. Pig iron is almost as brittle as glass, and it is useless in this form. In most modern steelmaking operations, molten pig iron is tapped from the blast furnace three or four times per day- it is not allowed to cool. The liquid pig iron is carried in ladles directly to a Basic Oxygen Furnace which converts the pig iron into steel. The basic oxygen converter uses a stream of pure oxygen to burn off the excess carbon. Impurities are also burned off, particularly phosphorus, silicon, and sulfur (which damage the steel's properties.) These elements all have a much higher affinity for oxygen than iron does, so the iron itself remains unchanged. Once the carbon content and the impurities are reduced to the desired level. The oxygen is shut off, and the iron has now become steel. At this point other alloying elements may be added, such as chromium, manganese, or molybdenum. These elements improve the steel's properties, but also add to it's price. If necessary, more carbon can be added as well if the carbon content has accidentally dropped too low. Finally, molten steel from the basic oxygen furnace is poured off. It can be cast into ingots, billets, or thin slabs.
Q:Why aren't bullets made of steel?
Okay one side note before going into the main issue. Steel is really really hard on rifle barrels. Okay, so the most common lead 9mm bullet weighs 124 grains. If all that was wanted was higher velocity, you could switch to a 115 grain bullet (which some people do), or even a 90 grain bullet if you are a reloader. (You see 90 grain bullets for 380 acp ammo, that same bullet could be reloaded onto a 9mm cartridge) But velocity alone doesn't give power. That's why a 115 grain 9mm bullet going at it's standard velocity does less damage than a 45 acp's 230 grain bullet going at it's standard velocity, because it weights twice as much and yet is going only a little bit slower But now go out to your front yard and grab a ping-pong ball and a rock about the same size. Throw them both as hard as you can. The ping-pong ball while lighter didn't go very far did it. See, the ratio of surface area to overall weight of ping-pong ball is very high, so air resistance works on it a LOT. And that is what makes lead so great for projectiles. It is dense so you have a very small surface area per unit of weight meaning that a steel bullet may beat lead in initial velocity but just 50 feet out the lead bullet would be going pretty much the same speed and at 100 yards out the steel would be dramatically slower. Note this is the same reason why 'secret sniper ice bullets' would never work even if you could get it to not melt...it's just too light. Ever hear of tanks and airplanes firing DU ammo? That stands for Depleted Uranium, it is something that is even more dense than lead which is why it makes an even better bullet than lead

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