Gavalume steel coil

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Packaging & Delivery

Packaging Detail:Standard export and seaworthy packing. (waterproof paper and metal sheet protection with fluted rings at inner and outer edges, 4 eye bands and 4 circumferential bands fasten the coil)
Delivery Detail:In 25 days after we got the advance payment or the formal LC

Specifications

GL Steel Coil
Thickness: 0.16-0.80mm;
Coils width: 700-1250mm
Coils weight: 3.0-8.0MT

GL / GALVALUME  STEEL COILS

With the professional produce line, we can manufacture the best quality GI as  below:

Thickness : 0.16mm-0.80mm
Width : 700mm-1250mm
Single weight : 3.0-8.0MT
Surface finished : Zero Spangle, Min Spangle, Normal Spangle, Big Spangle
Base Plate:AZ 60-180g/m2 AZinc-coating
Steel gardes : DX51D, SGCC, CGCC,ETC
Galvalume steel coil
Usage: Used in construction building material, profile, sandwich panel, corrugated sheet , roofing tile.
Mini. quantity : 25MT
Price       : FOB QINGDAO PORT  750-850USD/MT
Delivery time :15-25 days after we received your  advance money and Formal L/C
Payment terms : T/T or L/C
Supply ability : 40,000 MT per month


Special size and standard can be accepted.

Company introduce:

With more than 7 years' glorious history, 2 galvanized/Galvalume lines and 4 Prepainted Galvanized/Galvalume

Steel line, we produce hot dip galvanized/Galvalume steel coils more than 20,000 metric tons  per month and prepainted galvanized steel coils 40,000 metric tons of per month. We export quantity more than 40,000 tons per month totally.

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Q:What is the difference between LTCS and Carbon steel?
When exposed to elevated temperatures, quenched and tempered steels are more susceptible than normalized steels to permanent reduction in strength. This is especially true when exposure temperature begins to approach tempering temperature used when the parts were produced. In addition to losing strength, tempered steels also may experience reduced impact toughness after being exposed to long-term elevated temperatures. General belief is that this is the reason for LCC's reduced maximum allowable temperature limit of 345°C / 650°F in B16.34.
Q:Steel navel rings! what to do!?
When I worked at Spencer's the jewelry would usually said what grade/type of metal it was. As long as it says 316L surgical steel you should be ok. But like another person said, go to a professional piercer and buy jewelry there because you know that you're getting good quality. You get what you pay for!
Q:Which is stronger for cars, carbon fiber or steel?
Ok, your friend is wrong. Carbon fiber can outperform steel in many applications. It is lighter and stronger in tension. Compression, however, is not a property carbon fiber composites do well under. The strength of carbon fiber composites comes from the design, or layup, of the fibers. When the layers are properly orientated the composite can do very well. But, it can’t handle stress from any direction, only the directions it’s designed to be used in. Now, back to the car crash… A crash is a situation involving high amounts of crushing forces and shockwaves that would travel around the vehicle. If the impact itself didn’t crush the composite, the shock waves could cause hidden damage, such as delimitation, in areas that may not even be close to the impact area. As for it being easy to fix, well that is also dead wrong. Unlike steel, carbon fiber composites can’t be welded, straightened, or bent into place. Once a composite has sustained damage it usually needs to be replaced. Closing thoughts… Keep this in mind, it’s not the fibers themselves that are so weak, it’s the glue holding them together. As of today, the only way to make these strong light weight components is to glue them together. They do a good job doing what they are designed to do, but fail easily with impact and compression loading.
Q:British Steel Logo?
try OKorder.....really i think your local pawn shop should get an idea of the necklace.but if they don't have it ,go to OKorder.
Q:Can carbon steel be solution annealed?
No. Carbon steel has two different crystal structures, FCC and BCC , depending on the temperature. when you heat steel up and then quench it, it locks the crystal structure into the BCC form. this makes it hard. whereas precipitation hardened austentic stainlesses remain BCC regardless of the temp, so the hardness change is not a function of thermally induced strain. you can anneal carbon steel but the thermal profile is closer to the precipitation profile of PH stainlesses than it is to the Solution annealing profile.
Q:What specific metals are in steel?
steel is iron with a little bit of carbon mixed in. how much carbon determines the hardness of the steel. stainless steel is the same mostly, it has nickle and chromium added in to make it corrosion resistant.
Q:aluminum vs. steel?
You would think that is the case, right? Well, it isn't. Steel rims are necessarily made of very thin sheet. This sheet, when formed into a rim tends to dent very easily. On top of that, because the material is so thin it can and does flex- a lot. Aluminum rims on the other hand are formed by a process called extrusion... basically, a big block of material is shoved through a die (think PlayDoh shape maker) and then formed into rims. This forming process along with the stiffer nature of aluminum (in this instance) makes an aluminum rim far stronger and far lighter than a steel counterpart.
Q:Carbon Steel/ Stainless Steel knives?
If your talking about a folding pocket knife, I think that it's basically six one way and a half dozen the other. I actually do prefer stainless for my pocket knives. I don't want to oil a knife to the degree I feel carbon requires, only to then stick it my pocket to attract dirt to the knife and oil to my pants. I'm the exact opposite on sheath knives though. I like 1095 carbon steel, plain edge sheath knives. I'll thrash on them HARD, and I rarely have major edge problems. Of course, I require them to be coated with some kind of powder coat or the like, because they can rust, but I do try and keep them clean and dry when in the sheath, so they won't pit the uncoated edge. My reasons for this sheath knife preference is multi-fold. First, these knives are simply affordable. I don't spend $80 dollars on a outdoors sheath knife. I use the tool too hard to want to spend more. I don't like the more traditional stainless steels such as AUS-8, 420HC, and 440C (not to mention the HORRENDOUS 440A) because I feel that the all else being equal, a stainless blade will bend before a carbon blade will break. I also think that carbon holds an edge at least as well, if not better, than traditional stainless, and it's much easier to hone. I don't know much about these new laminates, other than the very hard, but not so tough. They seem to be POSSIBLY too brittle for my use. That, combined with the fact that they cost a FORTUNE, means that I just won't be considering them.
Q:Chemical equation for steel?
I hate to differ but I must. Steel is a mixture of iron and carbon but the carbon content ranges from a small fraction of a percent to no more than 2%. Stainless steel is an alloy of Iron and up to 15% or so of other metals but since there are several types and many varieties in each type it's hardly worth getting into. A good common hardenable high-carbon spring steel is AISI 1095. In this code the 95 refers to 0.95% carbon. When the carbon level goes up to 1.5% to 2% the steel is very brittle and black with the highest carbon steel being pretty much pig-iron.
Q:Chemical difference between steel & stainless steel?
steel is also an alloy - principally of iron and carbon. The reason ordinary steels rust is that the iron oxide is not tightly bound to the surface, revealing fresh metal to be oxidised. Stainless (like aluminium and titanium, both very reactive metals) forms a tough coat of oxide that protects the bulk.

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