Galvanized steel strip coil in SGCC hot-dipped

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China main port
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TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
25 m.t.
Supply Capability:
32634 m.t./month

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Item specifice:

Standard: AISI,GB,JIS Technique: Hot Rolled Shape: Round
Surface Treatment: Galvanized,Chromed Passivation Steel Grade: Q195,Q235,Q215B,HRB400,300 Series Certification: ISO
Thickness: 1.8-3 mm Width: max 2000mm Length: As customer's requirement
Net Weight: 3-12 MT Surface structure: zero spangle, regular spangle or minimum spangle

Product Description:

Hot-dip galvanized steel coils are available with a pure zinc coating through the hot-dip galvanizing process. It offers the economy, strength and formability of steel combined with the corrosion resistance of zinc. The hot-dip process is the process by which steel gets coated in layers of zinc to protect against rust. It is especially useful for countless outdoor and industrial applications. Production of cold formed corrugated sheets and profiles for roofing, cladding, decking, tiles, sandwich walls, rainwater protective systems, air conditioning duct as well as electrical appliances and engineering.

Standard  and Grade :

Hot-dip galvanized steel coils


ASTM A653M-06a

EN10327:2004/

10326:2004

JISG 3302-2010

AS-NZS 4534-2006

Commercial   quality

CS

DX51D+Z

SGCC

G1+Z

 

 

 

Structure   steel

SS GRADE   230

S220GD+Z

SGC340

G250+Z

SS GRADE   255

S250GD+Z

SGC400

G330+Z

SS GRADE   275

S280GD+Z

SGC440

G350+Z

SS GRADE   340

S320GD+Z

SGC490

G450+Z

SS   GRADE550

S350GD+Z

SGC570

G550+Z


S550GD+Z


G550+Z



Technology test results:

Processability

Yield strength

Tensile strength

Elongation %

180°cold-bending

Common   PV

-

270-500

-

d=0,intact,no zinc removal

Mechanical   interlocking JY

-

270-500

-

d=0,intact,no zinc removal

Structure   JG

>=240

>=370

>=18

d=0,intact,no zinc removal

Deep   drawn SC

-

270-380

>=30

d=0,intact,no zinc removal

EDDQ   SC

-

270-380

>=30

d=0,intact,no zinc removal

Galvanized steel strip coil in SGCC hot-dipped

Galvanized steel strip coil in SGCC hot-dipped

Galvanized steel strip coil in SGCC hot-dipped



FAQ

Q: How do you guarantee the quality of your product?

A: Every process will be checked by responsible QC which insures every product's quality.

 

Q: How much is your delivery time?

A: Normally within 30 days of receipt of LC original or prepayment, but mostly according to the specific requirements or the quantity

 

Q: I need sample, could you support?

A: We can supply you with the sample for free, but the delivery charges will be covered by our customers. For avoiding the misunderstanding, it is appreciated if you can provide the International Express Account for Freight Collect. Also you can have a visit to us, welcome to CNBM! 

 

Company Information


CNBM International Corporation (CNBM International) is the most important trading platform of CNBM Group Corporation, a state-owned company under the direct supervision of State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission of the State Council.


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