Excellent Cold Rolled Steel Coil / Sheet in China

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Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
50 m.t.
Supply Capability:
5000000 m.t./month

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Specification

The raw material of cold rolled steel coil/sheet is high quality hot rolled product, and after pickling, kinds of new technology and new process of global cold rolling production have been applied. Therefore the manufacturing, home appliance, automobile etc. Quality of the goods could be guaranteed. The finished product has a variety of excellent capabilities, such as continuous rolling, degreasing, annealing, skin pass, slitting and cut to length line etc. Along with it many rocessing capability and smooth, flat surface. It’s widely used in outdoor and interior decoration, furnishing

 

COLD ROLLED STEEL

Thicknenss

0.10mm-4.00mm

Width        

600mm-2000mm

Sheets  length  

1200-6000mm

Coil inner  diameter  

508-610mm

Surface  treatement

matt finish/bright  finish,oiling/dry, bright anneal/black anneal

Coil  weight    

3-5t

Package & Delivery

Package details: Standardseaworthy packing for international delivery.

Delivery: According to theexact quantity of your order.

 

Quality of the goods could be guaranteed. The finished product has a variety of excellent capabilities, such as continuous rolling, degreasing, annealing, skin pass, slitting and cut to length line etc. Along with it many rocessing capability and smooth, flat surface. It’s widely used in outdoor and interior decoration, furnishing

 

 

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Q:Is stainless steel magnetic?
There are many types of stainless steel. Some are magnetic and some are non-magnetic. The magnetic properties of stainless steel are very dependent on the elements added into the alloy, and specifically the addition of nickel can change the structure from magnetic to non-magnetic. Poor heat treatment or high heat input welding of normal or high carbon austenitic stainless steels will cause sensitization, ie formation of chromium carbides. The formation of carbides not only reduces the corrosion resistance of the stainless steel but also tends to form martensite around the carbide. This martensite is magnetic and the more severe the sensitisation, the stronger are the magnetic properties. When nickel is added, for instance, the austenite structure of iron is stabilized. This crystal structure makes such steels non-magnetic and less brittle at low temperatures. Martensitic stainless steels are magnetic. *Wrought, austenitic stainless steels, such as 304 and 316, are generally regarded as non-magnetic in the annealed condition, ie they are not attracted significantly by a magnet. However, if they are cold worked they will be attracted to a permanent magnet. The change occurs because the cold work deformation induces a transformation of the microstructure from austenite to martensite. The effect is less marked in alloys with high concentrations of austenite stabilisers such as nickel, nitrogen and carbon. Once the martensite is formed, it may also become magnetised. *In contrast to the austenitic alloys, ferritic stainless steels such as 409 or 3Cr12/5Cr12 and martensitic stainless steels such as 420, are strongly attracted to a magnet even in the annealed state. The duplex and super-duplex stainless steels will also be strongly attracted because they contain about 50% ferrite in their microstructure. *
Q:What steel type Pokemon would be good against trainer red's lapras?
actually, steel isn't very good against water, so i would go with a water or electric type pokemon.
Q:Are there different types of steel that are used in construction of beach houses that withstand corrosion?
No, usually they are just coated or galvanized. To make a steel that is truly more corrosion resistant raises it's cost quite markedly, where as coatings are pretty cheap. Almost all structural steel is just A36 mild steel (like 0.1% carbon, 0.05% Mn, and not much else). There are higher grades of structural steel, and bridges are made with truly more corrosion resistant carbon steels, but for a house it's just not the case.
Q:Carbon Steel/ Stainless Steel knives?
There are different grades of Carbon Steel. A good grade is much harder than Stainless Steel and will stay sharp longer. It is also many times harder to get an edge on than Stainless Steel. I have had both and prefer the Stainless Steel because eventually the Carbon Blade does get dull, and you will wear out a Whet Stone trying to put the edge back on it. The Stainless Steel holds an edge an acceptable amount of time and is easier to sharpen when the time comes. Putting either knife through a can opener sharpener will ruin the edge and make it almost impossible to put another edge on the knife. Look closely and determine the angel of the bevel, then lay the knife bevel flat on a good whet stone and try to take a thin slice off of the stone. Turn the knife over and do the other side so you keep the edge centered on the blade. Keep turning the knife over and taking thin slices until it is sharp. Dress with a good quality sharpening steel.
Q:Nylon vs Steel Guitar?
Nylon is easy to use for beginners but steal sounds better.
Q:is magnetic steel hygenic to produce stainless steel utensils?
Magnetic steel rusts. That's why kitchenware is often made out of stainless. You can't turn magnetic steel into stainless, sorry. Metalurgy is a complicated subject, and is all about different alloys. It's far too involved to explain in a few paragraphs here, but no, they're not interchangeable in this case unless you want to produce kitchenware that rusts.
Q:are surgical stainless steel and surgical steel the same thing?
There are several different grades and specifications that are referred to collectively as surgical steel, or Surgical stainless steel Non-stainless steel is not used for piercings and sutures and the like, because of the obvious reason that it tends to rust. The most common grade referred to as surgical is 316L, which is also used for food handling equipment. 316L is tough and very durable and has outstanding corrosion resistance. But it is moderately expensive. Very cheap body jewelry may be made out of cheaper grades of stainless steel like 304 or even the dirt-cheap 409. 304 is less corrosion resistant than 316L ; Almost nothing good can be said of type 409, except that's it cheap. 409 is not technically known as surgical, but some manufacturers may claim it is, to increase their asking price and also to cause buyer confusion. Surgical tools, which are not meant to be implanted, are usually made of the well known 440C, which is extremely strong and excellent at holding and edge, but it is not very corrosion resistant and it is brittle. 440C is not usually considered surgical. It's also used to make kitchen knives.
Q:Why do we galvanise steel?
We galvanize steel to protect and prevent steel from rusting or corrosion. Rusting, for the most part is a layman's term that has been used exclusively to describe the chemical OXIDATION reaction of steel or iron with oxygen forming a reddish brown substance called rust. Zinc metal coating also oxidizes but does not form the reddish brown rust. Instead, it forms an oxide, just like the rust, which is iron oxide. The protection created by zinc is because it is more reactive to oxidizers, than steel or iron. Thus, the oxidizer will react with Zinc first before it will react with Iron, hence protecting iron. If the zinc is fully reacted then iron is next. BUT, the zinc oxide formed on the surface of the steel or iron is no longer reactive to oxygen and also creates a good physical barrier so that oxygen will not have chance to even have contact with the underlying steel. Isn't that neat! Here is chemistry at one of its useful best.
Q:Steel Arch Building.........!!?
i think a moment frame steel building with a parabolic arch from two corners with the top middle capstone looks pretty nice on four sides. on a plane view, the capstone forms a cross on roof top with a rectangular elevator shaft at middle and with several floors act as weight on the capstone. the four corners roof top floors have to have heavy columns reaching down to the foundation. then u draw a inverted V from the root of the arch to the capstone and filled the area between the arch and inverted V with trussed web members. this trussed arch can act as a wind bracing for the moment frame building. u have to investigate the proper angles for the trussed web members. if u set a vertical web member from the arch to the inverted V, that is at the largest gap and then build the truss web member from there. i would not only use one facade but double facade to increase the capacity of the building to resist vertical and lateral loads. however, the arch needs a tie beam to make sure the roots of the arch won't spread apart under compressive load and the load must be contain inside the arch. no one has build one like that yet.
Q:What grade of steel is best suited for use on ships. Specifically trawlers?
How big is your trawler going to be and what use, The ones you see off the Alaska Coast or a Gulf Coast Shrimper? My preference in today's economy would not make sense and that is Aluminum.....not steel at all, maybe even Fiberglass, but $$$$ talk so Steel is cheaper, but you need to know what you are doing. The designer of the hull should have specified the right /preferred grade. It today's world there are many more choices available. You use a mild steel, most often grade A or B, but some applications call for grade D. Check your blue prints and list of materials. Edit. Ok I understand. There are 2 ways to go. One is use a relatively cheep steel and use higher cost epoxy primers and paint, often requiring special surface preparation just before priming, or two, using a much higher cost steel with more chrome and nickel in it. Grades that begin with #3xxx These are weldable with rods that are available, and can be welded directly to mild steels. However these are 3X the cost. If your a Shrimper, I'm guessing gulf coast. I worked with several boat yards in the 70's installing spray urethane foam for insulating there holes. So I've been around lots of small yards from Florida to Texas. I'd call the nearest steel warehouse and ask what they would recommend. You might find what you want at a scrap yard. I've lucked out several times picking up 1/4 plate scrap$ and I'd bet the scrapyard guy would know just what you need. I know there are places to get what you need in Mobile and New Orleans. Good luck!

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