Colored Coated Stainless Steel of Cold Rolled

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Loading Port:
Shanghai
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
25 m.t.
Supply Capability:
8000 m.t./month

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Product Description:

Colored Coated Stainless Steel:


Standard:

            AISI,ASTM,GB,JIS

Thickness:

              0.25-0.8MM

Technique:

             Cold Rolled

Surface Treatment:

Coated

Application:

         Roofing

Special Use:

         Silicon Steel

Width:

  800-1250MM

Color:

           Ral or according to sample

Packaging & Delivery

Packaging Detail:color steel coil STANDARD EXPORT SEAWORTHY PACKING
Delivery Detail:25 DAYS AFTER DOWN PAYMENT

Specifications

color steel coil
Prime Quality, Quick Delivery, Competitive Price

Prepainted Galvanized Steel Coil (PPGI/PPGL)

 

Base material:                             Hot dipped galvanized steel

Width:                                       available from 800MM to 1250MM

Width Tolerance:                         within 0.02MM

Thickness:                                 available from 0.18MM to 0.80MM

Thickness Tolerance:                   within 0.15MM

Performance:                              Smooth or Matte

Color:                                         according to RAL standard

Lacquer Coating thickness:           according to customer needs

Supply capacity:                          8,000 Metric Ton per month

Our products has good performance on combining force and anti-erosion. We offer fine quality products and best price for our international customers.


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Q:Why is steel denser than wood?
Steel is basically a mixture (not the compound) of iron and carbon. Iron, by itself is an element and so is carbon. The atoms of Iron are larger in size compared to carbon. All the atoms of all the elements, smaller or larger, are spherical. If naturally a solid, the atoms of all such elements have voids as their atoms are closely packed. You can imagine a basket of oranges; you could see that void or empty space (which I am speaking about) between four or more of the oranges put together. Now, when heated to more than about 1500 degrees celcius, Iron melts and atoms in molten form increase space between themselves. Raising the teperature to 1800 degree celcius, carbon is mixed with iron. At this stage it causes the spherical carbon atoms to fill in the spaces present amongst the spherical atoms of the iron. On cooling, already dense iron becomes denser because no space is left there between its atoms. This denser form of iron + carbon has become steel in which carbon is not more than 3 to 4% of the total volume. Wood is nothing but a fallen and dried tree's part. When green and alive, tree's stem and branches have pores in there texture, which are fillled with water and other biological fluids necessary for the life of the plant. When dried all the fluids, especially water gets evaporated. and the pore are empty now. The term Density, means mass divided by volume (kg / cubic meters). Iron + Carbon (the steel) so tightly packed and Iron having very high atomic weight is surely denser than wood with just carbon and a few other elements with no significant role to play in the mass calculation; particularly if their are empty pore spaces filled with air only. Imagine the mass (which common people mistakingly call the weight) in kilograms of a peice of steel with dimensions of 1 meter cube and imagine the same for the dried wood. What do you think---which one is denser?
Q:Questions about Steel. Please Help?
It's going to be made from a Shock Resisting Tool Steel ideally. Those steels average .50-.55 % carbon. They combine the ability to withstand repeated blows with excellent hardenability and toughness.
Q:STEEL STRINGS ON CLASSICAL GUITAR?
It would work out easier to just get a new guitar.
Q:What is INOX Steel?
Inox Steel
Q:Damascus steel knife?
Pattern welded /damascus is too expensive to use as an everyday knife, as it can cost more than silver. It's best kept as a collection piece. You'd be stupid to keep it in your pocket or use it everyday. that would be a waste of money. Knives you use everyday might be lost or stolen, or they may get rusted, worn, or dirty..... ruining their value. From that point of view the strength or edge-holding ability means very little. Specifically, the bushcraft knife is pattern welded steel. True damascus or Wootz steel is something you'll only find in museums and private collections. they stopped making it several hundred years ago. Despite what many people have claimed, Wootz damascus was inferior to modern tool steels in every respect. It was a brittle, dirty material. It's legendary status has more to do with myth and storytelling. The reason they stopped making was undoubtaby because more modern methods came along that produced a more consistent product, more quickly and easily. Old technologies tend to be abandoned for good reasons. With pattern welded steel, about a dozen strips of two different grades of steel have been stacked, welded together, the twisted and forged to create interesting patterns. This more of an artistic process and doesn't improve the properties of modern steels. Pattern welded steel is for the most part, inferior to a homogenous blade made of a single grade of steel. First of all, PW is a handmade product which means there will be faults and oxide inclusions incorporated into the steel. The welding process is not perfect. Secondly, in the hardening and tempering process you end up with a compromise between the properties of the two different grades of steel. You end up with a product that is not quite as good as either steel would have been individually. The blade may either be too brittle or too soft.
Q:Why should I use stainless steel cookware?
I can't understand why you're having difficulty. My pans are as good as the day they were bought.I would never return to non-stick after having my stainless steel pans! Non stick coatings come off in the food-yuk! What are you cooking in them? Are you trying to wash them in the dishwasher? That never works well. I always put water in mine if I've done a custard or stew, beans or things like that, for a little soak before washing by hand in hot soapy water. They really are great even when I have burnt something, because you can scrape the burn with a sharp implement and you do no damage at all to the pan. I highly recommend them.
Q:Best steel for a all purpose knife?
Do you want apples or oranges? It's that kind of question. Here's my opinion. For large blades (over 6) 5160 or L-6 done properly makes a nearly unbreakable knife. I once pulled my 65lb vice out of the work bench with an 8 L-6 blade. As carbon content goes up edge holding increases but at the cost of overall strength. For smaller blades I prefer O-1 and 52100, these steels have about twice the edge holding as 5160 but cannot pass the 90deg bend test without breaking. 1095 is a fine steel, I prefer to make damascus from it, but when I do make a blade I want to show a temper line as this steel will do it well. Then we get into high alloy, D-2 is about as balanced as they come and for a smaller blade is second to none save the CPM steels. The CPM steels are very expensive and like the homogonous steel come in many alloys. As far as a chipping edge, that's more an indication of improper heat treating than anything. Carbon steel has more strength and edge holding potential than stainless. D-2 has enough chromium to be somewhat stainless but not beyond the threshold that grain growth becomes an issue. One last thing, the grind is important. The popular hollow grind cuts easily but is weak at the edge because it is thin. A flat grind has more mass and done properly cuts as well as the hollow. The convex is the strongest and is best suited for chopping or a polished edge to push through the material.
Q:Question about steel studs.?
Ask a Carpenter friend where you can buy metal studs. There should be a large drywall supplier somewhere close to your area - they usually also stock metal studs and ceiling grid that sort of all goes together for contractors. You will have a choice of 20 or 25 gauge studs track. 25 gauge is pretty flimsy so I suggest using 20 gauge. Get a small box of tek screws to attach studs to track. Also get some self drilling drywall screws 1+5/8 for 5/8 thick gyp bd. or 1+1/4 for 1/2 gyp bd. I would also buy MR drywall (moisture resistant) for any work in a basement. Another tip : Buy some 1x4 composite trim boards to use for your bottom plate. Clean the slab good where you plates will go, then use some Liquid Nails hd and glue your plates down to the slab. That way you won't be drilling holes in the slab that could allow water to seep up through them. The composite trim will not wick moisture and it will keep your metal studs up off the floor should you ever have a water problem in the bathroom. Keep your drywall up off the floor about 1/2 by laying a scrap pc. of drywall against the plate before you hang the board. Allow enough room to line the perimeter of your door frame with 2x 4 vs. metal stud. It makes it easier installing the door and trim.
Q:Is m390 steel aka 20cv steel a tool steel?
Not all tool steels work well in knife blades, but some of them are very popular. D2, M2, M4 and many others.
Q:DUCTILE-TO-BRITTLE TRANSITION TEMPERATURE IN STEEL LOW CARBON?
Transition Temperature Of Steel

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