color coated roofing sheet

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Product Description:

color coated roofing sheet

1) Quality Standard & Grade: JIS G3302, SGCC /  ASTM  653M  CQ/  EN10142 DX51D+Z

2) Thickness: 0.14mm-0.60mm Width: 914mm / 1000mm /  750-1250mm (BC)

3)  Thikness  tolerance: +/-0.02mm Width tolerance:+/0.02mm

4) Zinc coating : 60g/m2-180g/m2,Z60-Z180

5) color film thickness:20micro(doubled)

6) Surface Treatment: chromated , non oiled, skin passed

7) Packing: export standard packing,packed with moisture resistant paper and metal

wrapping,securely tied for export,on metal skids) Country of Origin :China

8)Applications:widely used for roofs, outer walls, cabinets

9)Delivery Time :30 days;Shipment: By bulk vessel or By container

10)payment  L/C  T/T



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Q:How to temper steel? ?
Heat treating easy, HA! It is the most critical part of bladesmithing. Done wrong and all those hours of work go up in smoke (or a snap of the steel). You'll need a bucket of oil, preferably one that is deep enough to go in point first. If not you'll have to go in edge first, not recommended on a double edged blade, ok for single edge. You'll need to build a charcoal fire long enough for the blade. You will need to blow air under the fire to get it hot enough, the challenge is getting the heat even. You get the fire going and established, put the blade in turning it back and forth (if you keep turning it in the same direction when it heats up you could work a twist in it). When it starts turning red pull it out and touch it with a magnet, if the magnet sticks put it back. Keep heating and repeating until the magnet no longer sticks. Heat a little more, then quench rapidly point first. Don't let the blade lean to one side as warpage will occur. When it cools enough to touch, check with a file. If the doesn't file cut then you've properly hardened the steel and it's ready for temper. Now comes the really hard part. Grind the scale off carefully,preferably with a side grinder with a flap wheel. I've had hard wheel break freshly hardened blades. After cleaning you'll need to put it in an oven (preferred) or use a torch and carefully heat the blade. Watch the temper colors (oven temp 500-550F) or with the torch as the steel turns colors blue to purple for a double edged weapon. Any warpage that occurs needs to be worked out at temping temp.
Q:Why not use stainless steel to make coins?
Stainless steel has been used by some countries to make coins, but it's not an ideal metal. When a coin is struck, a die comes down and strikes the blank with many tons of force (the blank is also sitting on top of another die--one has the image on the obverse (front) of the coin, while the other die has the image of the reverse of the coin). When the die strikes the blank, the force causes the metal in the blank to flow into the recesses of the die. The problem with stainless steel is that it doesn't want to flow into the die. To get an image, either the relief (how high the raised portion of the design will be) has to be very low, and the coin has to have a simple design, or they have to greatly increase the pressure of the strike. This slows the coining press down, and greatly shortens the life of the dies.
Q:Why is stainless steel rust proof?
Stainless steel is an alloy of iron and other metals, notably Chromium and vanadium. You do not see it with the naked eye but at the surface of any stainless steel (SS) there are iron atoms and chromium atoms that are exposed. However, the chromium reacts preferentially to form an oxide. In essence, think of chromium sacrificing itself for iron so that iron will not rust. What a nice guy huh! This is called passivation just like most responders said. However, more than that the chromium oxide forms a tight protective layer that forms a physical barrier preventing Oxygen or any oxidant to reach and attack the iron underneath it. Also, the chromium oxide formed is not FLAKY and porous, so it does not mar much of the surface as an iron oxide (rust) would. For science project, you may not make it too technical but you can make a reference or make an ANALOGY of rust prevention to high school or social situations as being there for your friend or classmate But in real life, when the odds are too great, that protection afforded by chromium may not be enough. Because eventually all steel exposed to very oxidizing atmospheres will rust. Just a little break in the surface is enough to start the process of rusting.
Q:Quick ... Does fire burn steel?
no, fire MIGHT cause steel to oxidize, depending on the alloy, but think of steel as a block of ice. Steel melts at 2800 degrees F and boils and evaporates at 5400 degrees. Some metals like magnesium can possibly catch fire but not steel
Q:How do you calculate density of the steel ball in grams per cubic centimeter?
To calculate the density of any object you will always use the formula: Density = Mass / Volume (P=M/V). You have recorded the known values of the mass and the diameter of the ball (sphere), so we have everything needed to calculate the Density. Mass is 66.80g, but we shall need to use another formula to calculate the volume of the sphere. The formula to use is 4/3 X Pi X radius cubed. However, first of all we need to turn your measurement of the diameter of the steel sphere into the radius of the steel sphere (So that it can be substituted in place of the “radius” in the above formula). Simply half the diameter to find the radius. So 2.51 cm divided by 2 is 1.255 cm. Now insert the radius 1.255cm into the above formula. It would be read like this: 4/3 X 3.14159… X 1.255 ¬cubed (OR 4/3 X 3.14159 X 1.255X1.255X1.255), = 8.2798. So, now we know that the sphere has a volume of 8.2798 cm cubed, we can use this number in place of the “V” in the density formula P=M/V, and we can also substitute in the Mass (66.80g). So now P=66.80 / 8.2798, which = 8.07g/cm cubed. Now we know that from your measurements, steel has a density of 8.07g/cm cubed! This is fairly close to the real life average density, which if I remember correctly is around 7.8 g/cm cubed. Just remember, though, that as steel is an alloy it’s density is not standard and varies due to carbon content etc. Anyway, I hope that helped you!
Q:Use of Steel in Jet Engines??
You could but you will have to run lower pressures and speed and thus lower power output. You should do some research the Me 262 the Nazi's built. I don;t know but I think they used steel. That's why the engine had to be serviced every few hours of flight.
Q:Is Steel a Pure Substance or a Mixture?
This Site Might Help You. RE: Is Steel a Pure Substance or a Mixture? No. Not Stainless steel, I mean STEEL. Not a specific type, but STEEL. Thanks. xo
Q:Soldering Steel Wire?
Soldering to steel is difficult. An electric iron may be enough depends on power. The steel must be clean. An abrasive like fine steel wool,fine sandpaper or even a rubber pencil eraser will work. Next an acid flux for the solder. Most electronic solder flux is not active enough for steel. Plumbers solder usually is. Plumbers solder is Lead free and has a slightly higher melting temp.
Q:Can fire resistant building materials burn hot enough to melt steel columns?
Gavin, the danger posed by steel columns and girders during a fire in a building, is not the danger of the steel melting but of the steel expanding and snapping the bolts that hold all of the steel together. Very high temperatures can be achieved in a building fire because the up-draft caused by the rising hot air, delivers a massive amount of oxygen to the burning carpet, paper and furniture. When a steel frame office tower burns, the heat expands the steel and snaps the bolts. This causes the building to fall-down and not necessarily, burn-down. I am too lazy to look-up the melting point of steel but it is not very high. That is one reason for the columns and girders in steel framed buildings, to be covered in asbestos (which is a fatally toxic material) or magnesium di-oxide.
Q:im getting a sword tommoro and i need to figure out the pros and con of stainless steel and carbon steel sword?
Well generally Stainless steel blades are machine made and are of a display quality.. so expect looks, but don't expect quality or functionality from one. From carbon steel, I'd say you'd be looking at swords for practitioners of a sword art, reenactment, and collector quality blades. Stainless Steel Pros: Good for short blades like kitchen knives, cheap, won't easily rust or corrode. Cons: Long blades like swords become increasingly brittle and can snap with light use, most lack actual tangs(part of the blade that keeps the blade in the handle.) and are just welded onto a wire that[if broken} will send the blade out like a missile when swung, these are cheap display quality only. Carbon Steel Pros: Are usually much stronger and of a higher quality than their stainless counterparts, are often handmade by professional sword-smiths, no two blades are alike, fully functional work of art. Cons: Requires responsible care and maintenance, will corrode and rust easier, can be much more expensive.

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