Color coated galvanized rolled steel Coils

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Shanghai
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TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
25 m.t.
Supply Capability:
30000 m.t./month

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Product Description

Brief Introduction
1. Prepainted Galvanized Steel Coil Coil is coated with organic layer, which provides higher anti-corrosion property and a longer lifespan than that of galvanized or galvalume steel sheets.
2. The base metals for Prepainted Galvanized Steel Coil is HDGI steel. The finish coats of Prepainted Galvanized Steel Coil can be classified into groups as follows: polyester, silicon modified polyesters, polyvinylidene fluoride, high-durability polyester, etc.
3. The production process has evolved from one-coating-and-one-baking to double-coating-and-double-baking, and even three-coating-and-three-baking.
4. The color of the Prepainted Galvanized Steel Coil has a very wide selection, like orange, cream-colored, dark sky blue, sea blue, bright red, brick red, ivory white, porcelain blue, etc.
5. The Prepainted Galvanized Steel Coil Coil can also be classified into groups by their surface textures, namely regular prepainted sheets, embossed sheets and printed sheets.
 

Specification
1. Thickness: 0.3-0.8mm
2. Width: 914-1250mm
3. Inner Diameter: 508mm
4. Weight of Steel Coil: 3-15MT
5. Available Dipped Layer: 50-150g/m2
6. Surface Texture: Normal Coated
7. Type of coating structure: 2/1 Coat the top surface of the steel sheet twice, coat the bottom surface once, and bake the sheet twice.
8. Front Side Paint Thickness: 15-25μm (bottom paint + top paint)
9. Back Side Paint Thickness: 5-10μm

 
Common performance of front coating
1. Thickness: 20μm
2. Pencil Hardness: 2H
3. 60° specular glossiness of coating: >60
4. 180°bend: 3T
5. Impact: 9J
6. Salt Fog Resistant: 500h
7. Color difference: <3ΔE

Application
1. Construction:   (Outside) workshop, agricultural warehouse, residential precast unit, corrugated roof, wall, rainwater drainage pipe, terrace, retailer booth, roller shutter door
(Inside) door, doorcase, light steel roof structure, folding screen, ceiling, elevator, stairway, vent gutter
2. Electrical appliance: refrigerator, washer, switch cabinet, instrument cabinet, air conditioning, micro-wave oven, bread maker
3. Furniture:  central heating slice, lampshade, chifforobe, desk, bed, locker, bookshelf
4. Carrying trade: exterior decoration of auto and train, clapboard, container, isolation lairage, isolation board
5. Others:     writing panel, garbage can, billboard, timekeeper, typewriter, instrument panel, weight sensor, photographic equipment

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Q:stainless steel refrigerator that doesn't leave fingerprints?
Stainless Look vs Stainless in refrigerators usually refers to true Stainless Steel versus Satina. There's pluses and minuses both ways actually. With true Stainless, you have the exact match to the rest of the kitchen (because Satina is only used on refrigeration), but it is more prone to fingerprints, and is not magnetic. The Satina finish has a good look when not directly near a Stainless appliance, and does not show fingerprints and will accept magnets, but is not an exact match to stainless. My usual recommendation is that if you have a kitchen full of Stainless products, stick with the true Stainless Steel. If the refrigerator is more isolated, or is the only thing you want to have a Stainless look, you may want to consider Satina. If you put a lot of magnets on the refrigerator, I'd also recommend to go Satina. And since you don't want fingerprints, the Satina steel might come to your liking.
Q:is Titanium Stronger than steel?
Titanium has better high temperature strength than steel. Titanium doesn't resist shocks like steel can. It's more brittle. It's also far more difficult to weld. Titanium must be welded in an oxygenless environment. The average strength of steels that are made is under that of titanium. However, the strongest steel is stronger than the strongest titanium. Steel is the only viable building material. Titanium is too rare, expensive, and hard to handle for structures of great height. Hope this helps. Peace and Love.
Q:material of guns before steel?
The most common was bronze, which was the strongest material that could be cast, at least until the industrial revolution. Until that time, furnaces which could reach temperatures hot enough to melt steel did not exist. The only way to work with steel would have been forging, which means hammering it into shape while red-rot. Obviously, this is not a very practical method for making large thick-walled cannons (though it was done on occasion. Small arms such as pistols and muskets could be easily made of steel by hand forging.) The most practical way to make cannons was pouring molten bronze which melts at significantly lower temperature than steel. Cast iron was also used. Note that Cast Iron contains 3%-7% carbon, compared to steel which only contains between 2% to 0.2% carbon. Due to the excessive carbon content of cast iron, it's melting point is about 500 degrees lower than steel enabling it to be melted with pre-industrial furnaces. Unfortunately, cast iron is also brittle, unlike steel or bronze. This means that a defective or cracked casting could easily explode, sending iron shrapnel everywhere. (Also, maiming and killing the gun crew, an experienced gun crew was as valuable as the cannon itself!) For this reason. Cast iron cannon were usually considered a cheap, risky alternative to expensive but durable bronze.
Q:i want to see the atomic structure of carbon steel?
This is actually a quite complex question... The atomic arrangement in steels can be controlled over a pretty wide range of different structures. This is really the fundamental reason why steel is such a commonly used material. The different atomic structures produce different physical properties so metallurgists have developed many different processes to control the atomic structure to get the properties they want. One simple answer is that Fe is BCC, body centered cubic at room temperature at equilibrium conditions. When you heat Fe up, it transforms to FCC, face centered cubic. If you continue heating Fe, it goes back to BCC, then it melts. The addition of C makes these structures (and the transformation temperatures) different. Deviating from equilibrium conditions by, for example, cooling very quickly (quenching) creates different atomic structures (one of the most important is known as martensite). Depending on how much C is in the steel, you can also have two different atomic structures (two different phases) present in equilibirum, for example, pearlite which is a mix of alpha Fe (BCC) and iron carbide Fe3C (orthorombic crystal structure). So... you need to think a little more about exactly what you want a picture of. I hope this helps
Q:what is the similarity beetween ironn and steel?
1. Both victim of corrosion
Q:where did WTC steel go?
some of the steel was recycled into a warship. I am not sure at what you are trying to get at with the forensic analysis of the steel. There is no conspiracy involving the towers outside of planes crashing into them despite what a lunatic fringe want you to think.
Q:I am getting a benchmade mpr (m390 steel) and am unsure if it is a good knife look at the chart below?
From what I read M390 is relatively wear resistant, with very high stain resistance and good toughness. It is quite hard to qualify steel as better than other steel because it depends on many factors. E.g. for a small folder designed for delicate cutting D2 at high hardness would perform better, but if the environment is corrosive, like saltwater then M390 would be better. I'm not so sure about using stainless steels in large chopping style knives, but I've seen M390 used for them as well. Obviously hardness had to be lowered, which reduces edge holding ability, especially at low angles. Overall, it's a good steel, but if it will outperform S30V or D2 or 154Cm depends on heat treatment and blade geometry, knife designed use, etc.
Q:What is extruded steel?
Extruded steel is only the steel being run through a die when it is heated, it usually reduces the size of the grain of the steel itself, enhancing toughness. Realistically though, in a handgun, it doesn't matter if the frame is cast or forged, both types will hold up to any amount of abuse, unless you use it as a sledgehammer, and are splitting stones with it, then the forged frame would win. 4140 is more than adequate for a slide/frame. Hell, even mild steel would be adequate as long as you don't mind some dings and scratches, and again, don't use it as a sledgehammer...
Q:Steel Price .........!!?
depends what u want..
Q:types of stainless steel?
Types of stainless steel There are over 150 grades of stainless steel, of which fifteen are most common. The AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) defines the following grades among others: - 200 Series—austenitic iron-chromium-nickel-manganese alloys - 300 Series—austenitic iron-chromium-nickel alloys Type 301—highly ductile, for formed products. Also hardens rapidly during mechanical working. Type 303—free machining version of 304 via addition of sulfur Type 304—the most common; the classic 18/8 stainless steel Type 316—Alloy addition of molybdenum to prevent specific forms of corrosion - 400 Series—ferritic and martensitic alloys.

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