cold rolled carbon steel coil with competetive price

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Loading Port:
Tianjin
Payment Terms:
TT OR LC
Min Order Qty:
500 m.t.
Supply Capability:
10000 m.t./month

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Product Description:

 

Quick Details

  • Standard: GB, JIS

  • Thickness: 0.5-2.0mm

  • Place of Origin: Hebei, China (Mainland)

  • Type: Steel Coil

  • Technique: Cold Rolled

  • Surface Treatment: Other

  • Application: Other

  • Steel Grade: ST12

 

Packaging & Delivery

Packaging Details:EXPORT packing
Delivery Detail:25 DAYS

Specifications

cold steel coil
thickness: 0.5-2.0mm
width: 1000-1250mm
Material: SPCC, ST 12, Q235, ST13,SPCD,ST16

cold steel coil
thickness: 0.5-2.0mm
width: 1000-1250mm
Material: SPCC, ST 12, Q235, ST13,SPCD,ST16

Specification:

0.5/0.6/0.8*1000*C

1.2/1.5/2.0*1250*C

1.2/1.5*1250*C

 0.7/0.8/1.0/1.2/2.5/3.0*1250*C

 

 

Specifications

Material: SS400
Thickness: 2.0-12mm
Length: 2438, 6000, 9000mm or as required.

SS400   11.5*1500   
SS400   11.5*2000   
SS400   2.0*1500    
SS400   2.3*1500    
SS400   2.5*1500    
SS400   2.5*1800    
SS400   2.75*1500   
SS400   3.0*1500    
SS400   3.5*1500    
SS400   3.75*1500   
SS400   4.0*1500    
SS400   4.3*1500    
SS400   4.5*1500    
SS400   4.7*1500    
SS400   4.75*1500   
SS400   5.5*1500    
SS400   5.7*1500    
SS400   5.75*1500   
SS400   5.8*1500    
SS400   7.3*1500    
SS400   7.5*1500    
SS400   7.75*1500   
SS400   7.75*2000   
SS400   9.3*1500    
SS400   9.75*1500   
SS400   9.75*2000   

 

 

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Q:For those metal experts out there, steel or stainless steel.?
Stainless okorder.com
Q:What type of steel is most bullet resistant?
any amount of steel, you can find a bullet or cannon big enough to go through it. The WWII battleships had 12 inches of steel, but a torpedo would still put a hole in that. Any bullet, on the other hand, and you can find a thick enough steel to stop it. It's just that the steel may be too heavy to be useful. .
Q:Does steel contain nickel?
*Most of the grades of stainless steel contains nickle except few grades of ferritic/Martensitic stainless steel. For example , SAE416 / SAE 420 does not contain Nickle. See Stainless steel designations table at following link:
Q:TRAGUS PIERCINg?!Stainless Steel?!?
It seems like less people are allergic to titanium than surgical grade steel.
Q:material of guns before steel?
The most common was bronze, which was the strongest material that could be cast, at least until the industrial revolution. Until that time, furnaces which could reach temperatures hot enough to melt steel did not exist. The only way to work with steel would have been forging, which means hammering it into shape while red-rot. Obviously, this is not a very practical method for making large thick-walled cannons (though it was done on occasion. Small arms such as pistols and muskets could be easily made of steel by hand forging.) The most practical way to make cannons was pouring molten bronze which melts at significantly lower temperature than steel. Cast iron was also used. Note that Cast Iron contains 3%-7% carbon, compared to steel which only contains between 2% to 0.2% carbon. Due to the excessive carbon content of cast iron, it's melting point is about 500 degrees lower than steel enabling it to be melted with pre-industrial furnaces. Unfortunately, cast iron is also brittle, unlike steel or bronze. This means that a defective or cracked casting could easily explode, sending iron shrapnel everywhere. (Also, maiming and killing the gun crew, an experienced gun crew was as valuable as the cannon itself!) For this reason. Cast iron cannon were usually considered a cheap, risky alternative to expensive but durable bronze.
Q:cleaning a steel pan?
they have drywall (mudding) sponges to sand mud when you fix walls in the house, they are grey, square, and do not scratch. They seem to work better than any scrubber ever. Make sure you use a degreaser dishsoap like dawn. Maybe try putting your heat lower in the pan and cooking things more slowly?
Q:What is the difference between a steel strip and a coil? The steel strip is flat steel, and the steel coil is made of steel.
Steel rolls are also called steel belts. There is no difference between them. They are not flat steel
Q:i want to see the atomic structure of carbon steel?
This is actually a quite complex question... The atomic arrangement in steels can be controlled over a pretty wide range of different structures. This is really the fundamental reason why steel is such a commonly used material. The different atomic structures produce different physical properties so metallurgists have developed many different processes to control the atomic structure to get the properties they want. One simple answer is that Fe is BCC, body centered cubic at room temperature at equilibrium conditions. When you heat Fe up, it transforms to FCC, face centered cubic. If you continue heating Fe, it goes back to BCC, then it melts. The addition of C makes these structures (and the transformation temperatures) different. Deviating from equilibrium conditions by, for example, cooling very quickly (quenching) creates different atomic structures (one of the most important is known as martensite). Depending on how much C is in the steel, you can also have two different atomic structures (two different phases) present in equilibirum, for example, pearlite which is a mix of alpha Fe (BCC) and iron carbide Fe3C (orthorombic crystal structure). So... you need to think a little more about exactly what you want a picture of. I hope this helps
Q:What is Damascus steel.?
Damascus or Wootz was a type of steel that appeared around 300BC It originated in India before spreading throughout Asia and the Middle East. It was considered a good steel, and for it's date of origin, exceptionally advanced for the level of technology in the ancient world. However the techniques to create the steel were lost forever after a decline in the swords manufacturing. The most popular theory is that the metal containing the required trace elements became less available over time due to unreliable trade routes. In the modern area, many scientists and metallurgists have studied the surviving blades, resulting in many discoveries such as evidence of carbon molecules fused in a crystalline structure. While the blades do provide some clues, it's only a small part of a much bigger picture as to the full process of the metal from raw to finished product. Now many have claimed to have recreated Damascus/Wootz steel, but none are recognised as being authentic. It has become a market ploy these days that draws people to purchasing the blades but all you are actually seeing is one of the many various forms of folded or patterned steel, which has varying degrees of quality, strength etc. We do know the steel was folded similar to the way the Japanese did in creation of old Katana, so often people will sell Damascus steel Katana that are nothing but folded steel swords like others. (Which is beautiful and traditional, but was a process designed to uniform impurities in the metal, something we no longer need to do with modern metals)
Q:Steel Building Structures?
Yes okorder.com/

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